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Wildfire - Crossref

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Last Updated: 24 June 2022

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Coupling wildfire spread simulations and connectivity analysis for hazard assessment: a case study in Serra da Cabreira, Portugal

This report seeks to determine wildfire risk in northern Portugal by combining landscape-scale wildfire spread modeling and connectivity analysis to assist fuel planning. Wildfire hazard was determined by burn risk, fire size, conditional flame length, and fire potential index wildfire descriptors. To develop landscape networks and assess weather severity in landscape wildfire connectivity, Simulated fireline intensities were used. This paper contributes to future fuel treatment planning by incorporating wildfire connectivity in wildfire management planning of fire-prone Mediterranean landscapes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-107


An Executive Information System to Support Wildfire Disaster Declarations

Weather information is downloaded from multiple national weather data networks; large-fire data is manually entered. To process and archive daily weather files, A data-base management subsystem uses custom and commercial software packages. For every country's climate division, the decision support subsystem determines the likelihood of a big wild land fire for every climate division.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1287/inte.20.6.53


Ecological and genomic responses of soil microbiomes to high-severity wildfire: linking community assembly to functional potential

Abstract explains: Growing wildfire fire severity, which is widespread in the western United States, can have deleterious effects on plant growth and significant impacts on nitrogen cycling rates. Soil microbes are essential in these elemental cycles, and knowing the effect of increasing fire severity on soil microbial populations is crucial. Here, we investigate the long-term effects of high-severity fires on the soil microbiome. We find that high-severity wildfires result in a multi-decadal restoration of the soil microbiome mediated by soil chemistry, soil chemistry, and microbial assembly processes. Our results show a distinct taxonomic and functional successional pattern of increasing selection in post-fire soil microbial populations. Both changes in microbiome composition, specifically improved C metabolism and enhanced N cycling performance, were closely related to rates of potential decomposition and inorganic N availability, respectively.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-022-01232-9


Improving WRF-Fire Wildfire Simulation Accuracy Using SAR and Time Series of Satellite-Based Vegetation Indices

In the WRF-Fire fuel settings, we've updated the chaparral and timber standard woody fuel classes. To estimate the fuel load, we used the ESA global above-ground biomass based on SAR data, and the Landsat normalized difference vegetation index trends of woody vegetation to determine the fuel moisture content. In Israel, we investigated two wildfires using three different fuel models: the original 13 Anderson Fire Behavior fuel model, the original 13 Anderson Fire Behavior fuel model, and two upgraded fuel models including AGB alone, as well as AGB and dryness. The improved fuel model enhanced the simulation results dramatically, i. e. , the Jaccard similarity coefficient increased by 283% on average.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14122941


Links between soil moisture and InSAR data on a temperate raised peatland subjected to a wildfire

Synthetic Aperture Radar's Interferometry may be able to contribute to cost-effective regional or global monitoring of peatlands degradation and restoration. We examine the correlation between InSAR coherence, ground displacements, and in-situ soil moisture measurements for a temperate raised bog at Ballynafagh, Ireland, from 2017-2021. Ground displacements from Sentinel-1 C-band radar data show long-term degradation of the intact and Active Raised Bog. We show that InSAR coherence is directly related to the change in soil moisture, with major changes causing coherence decrease or disappearance. Within 60-70 percent of the intact bog area, the wildfire destroyed a 10-20 cm thick mossy layer of mossy vegetation. We therefore conclude that C-band radar waves attenuate in the active vegetation layer but penetrate through it into the top 10 to 10 percent of the underlying peat.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.31223/x50h0k


Tracing sediment sources after wildfire using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

The Nechako River Basin, which is located in central British Columbia, Canada, is a 52,000-square-kilometre regulated basin that has been greatly affected by large-scale landscape changes. Many of the burned area was completely denuded of vegetation in 2018, and the severity of the fires burned 3,682 km2 within the basin. The NRB is vital for chinook and sockeye salmon, as well as the Nechako White Sturgeon and, as a result of increased erosion as a result of increased erosion after the aforementioned landscape changes and exacerbated by wildfire, may have deleterious effects on fish health and populations. This research was conducted to find sediment sources in the Nechako River and its tributaries that were most affected by the 2018 fires by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are produced during organic material combustion. In addition, this study intends to determine the usefulness of PAHs as a novel tracer for future source apportionment studies.   Soil sampling was carried out in fall 2018, immediately post-fire at five sites that were sparked and five others that were unburned, as well as five others that were not. Samples at the unburned sites included the topsoil and subsoil, while burning sites featured the burned organic layer, exploded topsoil layer, and the subsoil layer, according to the burnet site. The main source of sediment, according to the Nechako River mainstem, was unburned, and more specifically, bank material.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/icg2022-509


Long-term effects of wildfire on rock weathering and soil stoniness in the Mediterranean landscapes 

Soil filtration, thermal property degradation, erosion, and productivity are all dependent on rock fragments in soil and the soil surface, including water repellency, soil fracture, erosion, and productivity. This research sought two goals: to monitor and analyze the disintegrated flakes' spatio-temporal distribution ten years after the fire, as well as testing the hypothesis that fires contribute to increased soil stoniness by physical and chemical flake erosion. Although earlier studies showed that increasing rock fragment coverage is often associated with fine particle removal, our findings showed a significant rise in rock fragments due to fire-induced exfoliation of rock surfaces, contributing to long-term changes in soil characteristics. When determining the effects of rock fragments on hydrological and geomorphological processes or post-fire soil rehabilitation, we therefore recommend that the size, shape, and spatial distribution of rock fragments be considered.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/icg2022-169


Estimating WUI exposure probability to a nearby wildfire

Abstract Background: Estimating the risk of wildfire burning the wildland urban interface can assist managers in making decisions to minimize WUI property destruction. We start by designing fire and WUI interaction zones and fire spread funnels between recorded fire fronts and WUI blocks. Conclusions The focal investigation we conducted based on fire spread funnels and random forest models can be used to determine WUI fire risk exposure probabilities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-1728437/v1


Climate-Driven Changes in High-Intensity Wildfire on Orbital Timescales in Eurasia since 320 ka

However, the lack of high-resolution records of long wildfires has limited our knowledge of wildfire distribution, long-term trends of wildfires, and the reasons for the changes in wildfire on orbital timescales. According to our results, continuing fire on a continental scale over the last 320 ka has been higher during glacial periods than during interglacial periods. The rise in wildfire frequency during glacial periods is attributed to less precipitation. Changing patterns of wildfire incidence between marine isotope stages 2 and 6 in the Northern Hemisphere can be attributed to varying configurations of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheet between glacial periods. The precession of the Earth's orbit pace wildfire development suggests a regularity of 23 ka of our wildfire records.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2113/2022/7562666

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions