Advanced searches left 3/3

Weight Loss - MedlinePlus Genetics

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 25 April 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Perry syndrome

Perry syndrome is a progressive brain disease that is characterized by four key features: a pattern of mobility abnormalities such as parkinsonism, psychopharmaatric changes, body loss, and abnormally slow breathing. Depression, general lack of interest and enthusiasm, isolation from family and family, and suicidal thoughts are all typical psychiatric changes that accompany people with Perry syndrome. Earlier in the disease, many affected individuals experience significant, unexplained weight loss early in the disease. People with Perry syndrome have been suffering for about five years after signs and symptoms first appeared.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/perry-syndrome


Chronic myeloid leukemia

Normal bone marrow has red blood cells that protect the body against infection, white blood cells that shield the body against infection, and platelets that are involved in blood clotting. The bone marrow produces too many white blood cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. However, as the disease progresses, immature white blood cells called myeloblasts build in the blood and bone marrow. The overgrowth of myeloblasts hinders other blood cells' formation, resulting in a shortage of red blood cells and platelets. When a blood test is done for another reason, approximately half of people with chronic myeloid leukemia do not have any signs and symptoms and are diagnosed. The number of mature white blood cells in the chronic phase has risen, while myeloblasts account for less than 10% of blood cells. Myeloblasts account for 30 percent or more of blood or bone marrow cells in a blast blast.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/chronic-myeloid-leukemia


Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic disease that causes inflammation in connective tissues, such as cartilage and blood vessels' linings, which give strength and flexibility to structures throughout the body. SLE is one of a large group of illnesses classified as autoimmune disorders that arise when the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. Extreme exhaustion, a vague sense of discomfort or illness, sweat, loss of appetite, and weight loss may have first appeared as extreme exhaustiness. Joint pain, often affecting both joints of the body, as well as muscle pain and weakness are common problems among those affected people. SLE has skin problems that are common. Other skin problems that may occur in SLE include calcium deposits under the skin, impaired blood vessels in the skin, and tiny red spots called petechiae. In addition to hair loss and open sores in the moist lining of the mouth, nose, or, more commonly, the genitals, affected people. Around a quarter of people with SLE have kidney disease. Heart problems may also arise in SLE, including inflammation of the sac-like membrane around the heart and abnormalities of the heart valves, which regulate blood flow in the heart. Heart disease caused by fatty buildup in the blood vessels, which is extremely common in the general population, is even more prevalent in people with SLE. People with SLE have episodes in which the illness becomes worse and then get better, while other times when it gets better.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/systemic-lupus-erythematosus


Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

In most cases, the signs and symptoms of APECED began in childhood or adolescence. CMC is usually the first of three APECED's three main characteristics to become apparent in people with this disorder. Infections of the tube that transports food from the mouth to the stomach are also common, although skin and nails are less affected. Parathyroid hormone production is reduced as a result of damage to the parathyroid glands. In a third significant feature of APECED, adrenal gland insufficiency, damage to the tiny hormone-producing glands on top of each kidney's findings. Type 1 diabetes is a result of impaired production of the hormone insulin; a shortage of growth hormone leading to short stature; conditions affecting the internal reproductive organs that may lead to inability to reproduce children; and thyroid gland dysfunction, which can cause numerous signs including weight gain and fatigue. People with APECED may have additional signs and symptoms related to a variety of other unusual signs and symptoms. Other signs that appear in people with APECED include stomach irritation, liver inflammation, swollenness, skin inflammation, and dry eyes, hair loss, skin pigment fading, elevated blood pressure, or a small or absent spleen.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy


Primary sclerosing cholangitis

Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a disorder that affects the bile ducts. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a result of inflammation in the bile ducts that results in scarring and narrowing of the ducts. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is usually diagnosed around age 40, and for unknown reasons, it affects both males and women twice as often as women. Embestation, pain in the abdomen, and extreme itchiness are all typical signs and symptoms of primary sclerosing cholangitis. As the disease progresses, patients may experience yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes, as well as an increased spleen. Eventually, the buildup of bile damages the liver cells, causing chronic liver disease and liver disease. Vitamin D, a fat-soluble vitamin that helps absorb calcium and helps bones harden, and a lack of this vitamin can cause bone thinning in people with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is often associated with another disorder, inflammatory bowel disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the intestines that causes open sores in the intestines and abdominal pain. About 75% of people with primary sclerosing cholangitis have inflammatory bowel disease, the most common form of the condition known as ulcerative colitis. In addition, people with primary sclerosing cholangitis are more likely to have an autoimmune disorder such as type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, or thyroid disease than people without the condition. People with primary sclerosing cholangitis are also at risk of experiencing cancer, particularly of the bile ducts.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/primary-sclerosing-cholangitis


Chronic granulomatous disease

Individuals with chronic granulomatous disease may have recurring bacterial and fungal infections. People with this condition may also have spots of inflammation in certain tissues that could result in tissue damage. Chronic granulomatous disease is the most common disorder in childhood, although some people do not experience symptoms until later in life. At least one serious bacterial or fungal infection outbreak in every 3 to four years is typical among people with chronic granulomatous disease. Individuals with persistent granulomatous disease may experience mulch pneumonitis, which causes fever and shortness of breath after exposure to decaying organic materials such as mulch, hay, or dead leaves. People with chronic granulomatous disease and the numerous fungi involved in their decomposition can develop fungal infections in their lungs. The skin, liver, and lymph nodes are all common areas of infection in people with persistent granulomatous disease. In patients with chronic granulomatous disease, inflammation can occur in several areas of the body. In addition to the stomach, colon, and rectum, as well as the throat, and skin, there are other common areas of inflammation in people with chronic granulomatous disease. Inflammation in the stomach can prevent food from traveling through the intestines, resulting in an inability to digest food. People with persistent granulomatous disease also have autoimmune disorders that arise when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/chronic-granulomatous-disease


21-hydroxylase deficiency

The deficiency of 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a hereditary disease that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands secretly produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones, in people with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Males and females with either classic or 21-hydroxylase deficiency tend to have an early growth spurt, but their final adult height is usually shorter than those in their families. Females can also experience heavy body hair growth, male pattern baldness, and irregular menstruation. Approximately 75% of people with classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency have the salt-wasting form. Individuals with the basic virilizing process do not suffer salt loss. Males generally have normal genitalia, but the testes can be small. Females with the non-classic name of 21-hydroxylase deficiency have normal female genitalia. Males of the non-classic species may have early beard development and small testes. Some people with this type of 21-hydroxylase deficiency have no signs of displaying symptoms of the disorder.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/21-hydroxylase-deficiency


Juvenile polyposis syndrome

Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a condition marked by numerous noncancerous growths, termed juvenile polyps. Polyps begin before age 20 for those with juvenile polyposis syndrome; however, in the condition's name, "juvenile" refers to the organs that make up the polyp, not the age of the affected individual. If a person has any one of the following: more than five juvenile polyps of the colon or rectum; juvenile polyps in other regions of the gastrointestinal tract; or any number of juvenile polyps and one or two family members are affected. Single juvenile polyps are relatively common in adolescents and are not indicative of juvenile polyposis syndrome. Based on the signs and symptoms of the condition, three specific forms of juvenile polyposis syndrome have been described. Polyps that appear throughout the gastrointestinal tract during infancy are characteristic of juvenile polyposis of infancy. paraphrasedoutput polyps first appeared in childhood and are common among youth polyposis and juvenile polyposis coli. Most juvenile polyps are harmless, but there is a chance that polyps can become cancerous. People with juvenile polyposis syndrome have a ten to a risk of developing a cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, according to it. Colorectal cancer is the most common form of cancer found in people with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/juvenile-polyposis-syndrome


Ulcerative colitis

Urgent pain and cramping along with frequent diarrhea are often associated with blood, pus, or mucus in the stool, and are often associated with ulcerative colitis. In some affected individuals, chronic inflammation and ulcerated intestinal tissue can result in a red blood cell shortage. Toxic megacolon is a rare complication of ulcerative colitis that can be life-threatening. Ulcerative colitis has also raised the risk of colon cancer, particularly in people whose entire colon is flamed and in people who have suffered ulcerative colitis for 8 or more years. Ulcerative colitis is the most common cause of inflammatory bowel disease. Unlike ulcerative colitis, which affects only the inside of the large intestine, Crohn disease can cause inflammation in any part of the digestive system, and the inflammation extends into the intestinal tissue.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/ulcerative-colitis

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions