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Vitamin C - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 22 April 2022

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African iron overload

An African iron overload is a condition that requires absorption of too much iron from the diet. A diet high in iron gives African iron overload, according to a diet high in iron. In African iron overload, excess iron accumulates primarily in reticuloendothelial cells, which are specifically found in specialized immune cells. Iron deposits in liver cells also accumulates later in the course of the disease. This pattern contrasts that found in a hereditary hemochromatosis disorder, in which the excess iron accumulates mainly in the hepatocytes. When too much iron is absorbed, the resulting iron overload can eventually damage tissues and organs. Chronic liver disease can be characterized by iron overload in the liver. Cirrhosis can raise the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma, a form of liver cancer. Iron deficiency in immune cells may affect their ability to fight infections. An elevated risk of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis is attributed to African iron overload, as well as tuberculosis. Vitamin C deficiency diseases such as scurvy are also linked to a faster-than-normal breakdown of vitamin C in the body, so affected individuals are at a greater risk of vitamin C deficiency disorders such as scurvy. People with African iron overload may have a modestly low number of red blood cells, owing to the iron that builds in the liver, bone marrow, and spleen is less suitable for making red blood cells. Ferritin stores and releases iron in cells, while cells produce more ferritin as a result of elevated amounts of iron.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/african-iron-overload


Tyrosinemia

Tyrosinemia is a genetic disorder characterized by disruptions in the multistep process that breaks down the amino acid tyrosine, the building block of most proteins. Because of inadequate food intake, infants are unlikely to gain weight and grow at the expected rate due to poor diet tolerance because high-protein foods contribute to diarrhea and vomiting. Tyrosinemia type I can cause liver and kidney disease, softening and weakening of the bones, and an elevated risk of liver cancer. Children with tyrosinemia type untreated children with tyrosinemia type Idael Inability children with tyrosinemia of tyrosinemia type I often do not live past the age of 10. Tyrosinemia type II can influence the eyes, skin, and mental growth. About 55% of people with tyrosinemia type II have some degree of intellectual impairment. Tyrosinemia type III, which is the rarest of the three species, is the rarest of the three forms.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/tyrosinemia

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions