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Vitamin C - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 22 April 2022

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Vitamin C: Assessing Safety After Lung Transplant

The investigators will exclude patients from whom vitamin C's recommended dosing regiment exceeds 100 mg/kg/day, to this point. To determine whether parenterally administered ascorbic acid is safe in the lung transplant population, and the responsiveness of vitamin C levels to our proposed parenteral therapy Goals: To determine whether primary graft dysfunction reductions can improve patient outcomes after lung transplantation are reduces the risk and severity of PGD after lung transplantation can be reduced by reducing primary graft dysfunction short and intermediate-to-long term, AKI's Grade 2 AKI is an acute, unexplained hemoglobin.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04505878


Vitamin C Infusion for TReatment in Sepsis and Alcoholic Hepatitis

Alcoholic hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver as a result of alcohol intake. Patients with alcoholic hepatitis and sepsis have low bloodstream Vitamin C levels. Vitamin C has been shown to reduce inflammation and organ dysfunction in patients with severe infections. Vitamin C will not be effective in alcoholic hepatitis, according to the investigators. Vitamin C taken by mouth is not safe as a treatment for people with this condition, so participants will receive the Vitamin C intravenously.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03829683


Urinary Vitamin C Loss in Subjects With and Without Diabetes

Several studies have shown that diabetic patients have lower plasma vitamin C levels than non-diabetic patients. Although urinary vitamin C levels in diabetic patients was found to be up in two studies, they are impossible to interpret due to a lack of controlled vitamin C intake, inadequate sampling, a lack of control subjects, or methodological inconsistencies in vitamin C assay and sample processing. Low plasma vitamin C levels in diabetic patients may be due in part to inadequate renal deficiency of vitamin C in these patients but not in healthy controls.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00071526


Lessening Organ Dysfunction With VITamin C (LOVIT)

Vitamin C may be the first therapy to combat the dysregulated cascade of events that leads to sepsis. Vitamin C can be used worldwide and dramatically change outcomes in both high- and low-income settings alike, if proven effective. At 6 months, it was determined whether intravenous vitamin C reduces mortality and morbidity in sepsis, as well as other biochemical and biochemical assessments of organ dysfunction. To determine the amount of intake, clearance, and plasma concentration over a course of 96 hours of intravenous vitamin C 50 mg/kg of body every 6 hours or matching placebo. Patients will be randomly assigned vitamin C or placebo for 96 hours. On day 28, the clinical staff will record the mixture of death or persistent organ dysfunction. Adult general Canadian and international intensive care units will be included in the LOVIT Trial. Blood samples will be obtained around the 8th dose at time 0 and then after administration at times 1h, 2h, 4h, and 6h. In 3 of the 25 participating centers, the PK subpoena will be conducted with 100 participants. The LOVIT trial will provide a comprehensive analysis of vitamin C monotherapy's effect on patient-relevant outcomes in the context of increasing off-label use of vitamin C for sepsis and ongoing trials of vitamin C for sepsis as well as other clinical trials.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03680274


Effectiveness of Vitamin C Supplementation in Infants and Children Suffering of Nutritional Rickets

88 infants and children with nutritional deficiencies will be recruited from the out-patient clinic of Cairo University Children's Hospital, as part of the study's population. The following vitamin C supplements are included in the following: Age, sex, onset of manifestations, dietetic history, family history of similar illness, incidence of tetany or convulsion, development of fibrogen, motor reproduction, fractures, and signs of vitamin C deficiency will be explored. [6] by ELIZA, catalogue number E1499Hu Bioassay technology la laboratory England/China The patient will be divided 1:1 by computer randomization sequence into two groups according to a randomized sequence. According to the Recommended Daily Allowance, all patients will receive a therapeutic dose of vitamin D and oral elemental calcium. However, group A of the above-mentioned therapy will also receive oral vitamin C in addition to the above-mentioned treatment.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05310760


Famine From Feast: Linking Vitamin C, Red Blood Cell Fragility, and Diabetes

Vitamin C's function in diabetic red blood cells may be attributed to unexpected way to avoid microvascular disease in diabetes. Low vitamin C levels in diabetic subjects' RBCs may be able to be increased by using vitamin C supplements. Vitamin C in diabetic rats' RBCs will be determined as a result of glycemia, without vitamin C supplementation, and with vitamin C supplementation. Even with baseline vitamin C levels, the primary aim of the first hospitalization will be to determine the effect of hyperglycemia on vitamin C RBC physiology. Following the completion of arm 1's testing, participants in arm 2 will be given a prescription for vitamin C 500 mg twice a day. Given that vitamin C and vitamin E are both antioxidants, and that both vitamins seem to be linked to RBC rigidity, diabetic patients may also be given a prescription for 400 international units of vitamin E daily. Subjects will continue vitamin C and E supplementation for a minimum of 8 weeks, depending on RBC vitamin C and E concentrations. During various phases of arms 1 and 2, to determine any effect of vitamin E supplementation, plasma, and RBC vitamin E levels may be measured concurrently with vitamin C levels, as well as vitamin C levels. Dietary vitamin C supplements will be limited to between 30 and 35 mg per meal to avoid obscureing plasma vitamin C changes that may result from hyperglycemia.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02107976


Study on the Association Between Vitamin C Deficiency and Diarrhea in Children

The primary aim of this investigation is to determine the effects of vitamin C deficiency on diarrheal infections in children aged 2 to 5 years in countries with a high diarrheal prevalence. This issue will be addressed by comparing vitamin C levels in children with diarrhea, regardless of the infectious agent, to those in age- and sex-matched controls. We want to find out whether vitamin deficiencies may exist in children living in developing countries and determine the serum vitamin A, C, and E levels in children with diarrheal diseases.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05328037


Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effect of Vitamin C Supplementation in Autologous Stem Cell Transplantations

Rationale: Ascorbic acid, according to new studies, promotes T lymphocyte proliferation and maturation of T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Low amounts of AA were discovered in several patients' plasma following chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies, according to a pilot study. Objective: This research is designed to investigate the effects of vitamin C supplementation on immune health in patients of autologous stem cell transplantation. The purpose of the run-in phase of the investigation is to determine the effect of intravenous vitamin C supplementation on plasma levels of vitamin C in patients with autologous stem cell transplantation at day 14 in order to be sure that healthy AA plasma levels will be present in the intervention study. Primary endpoints: After stem cell transplantation, cellular transplantation will be AA plasma level on day 14 and the day of neutrophil recovery after stem cell transplantation.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03964688


Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of Ascorbic Acid in Healthy Human Subjects

Vitamin C is a key water soluble vitamin that is needed to maintain healthy skin. Our studies in Belfast were the first to demonstrate in healthy men and women how changes in a vitamin concentration in human plasma are a direct result of the amount consumed, which was shown in a broad range. We plan to achieve a prescorbutic vitamin C plasma concentration of approximately 5-10 micromolar in healthy human volunteers as a result of the present study. We will also determine whether vitamin C levels increase in gene expression and metabolic profiles. Vitamin C will be added to foods by outpatient patients. Vitamin C deficiency can be inpatients by feeding animals on a tightly restricted scorbutic diet. Plasma vitamin C levels will be measured several times a week. Subjects will be tested for plasma ascorbate concentrations and urine collection at a timed 48 hoursr urine sampler after each dose's steady state is reached.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00001309

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions