Advanced searches left 3/3

Venous Thrombosis - Crossref

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 08 August 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Cerebral venous thrombosis in traumatic brain injury: a cause of secondary insults and added mortality

OBJECTIVE Cerebral thrombosis is increasingly prevalent in chronic brain injury, but its causes and effects on outcome remain uncertain. The authors' review explores the challenges and effects of CVT in TBI patients. METHODS IN a retrospective, case-control study of patients in the Oslo University Hospital trauma registry and radiology registry from 2008 to 2014, the authors found TBI patients with CVT and without CVT in a retrospective, case-control study. CVT and CT or MR venography outcomes were found by AIS98 or ICD-10 codes for CVT and CT or MR venography results, which was negative for CVT, while controls had no AIS-u201998 or ICD-10 code for CVT or ICD-10 code for CVT and CT or MR venography results, which were reported to be negative for CVT, although CVT and CT and MR venography, or MR venography results for CVT In a multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for the initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, Rotterdam CT results, and Injury Severity Score, there were cases of complications due to CVT. In a prespecified subgroup study, according to CVT's location and degree of exclusion from CVT, complications and mortality were also assessed. Comparing to 4% for no CVT, an association between CVT location and outbreak of complications resulted in unadjusted 30-day mortality of 50% for midline or bilateral CVT, and 8% for unilateral CVT, compared to 4% for no CVT. The adjusted results revealed a significantly higher mortality in the midline/bilateral CVT group than in the no-CVT group. CONCLUSIONS There are a high incidence of CVT-related disorders in TBI patients, contributing to secondary brain insults.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.4.jns20511


Cerebral deep venous thrombosis and COVID-19: case report

The authors discuss the case of a 54-year-old male diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 during a screening test. With mild right-sided thalamic and periventricular diffusion restriction, a MRI of the brain revealed bithalamic and gangliocapsular FLAIR signal abnormalities, as well as mild ventricular diffusion restriction. Given the onset of edema and apparent deep venous thrombosis involving the bilateral internal cerebral veins and Galen's veins, a CT venogram was obtained. The COVID-centric polymerase chain reaction test and bacterial cultures were negative, but CSF workup was negative for encephalitis. The emotional decline was attributed to bithalamic and gangliocapsular venous infarction secondary to deep venous thrombosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.5.jns201542


Mechanical thrombectomy and intravascular imaging for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a preclinical model

OBJECTIVE The majority of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis will be treated with anticoagulation therapy, but a portion of patients will be present in a comatose state or continue to worsen clinically despite early anticoagulation. In these situations, in addition to addressing the underlying thrombophilia, prompt thrombolysis may be helpful. And there are currently no preclinical endovascular thrombectomy models for CVST, with repurposed arterial thrombectomy methods failing in the cerebral venous sinus. METHODS Five male Yorkshire swine weighing 45 kg were used for five years in a row. Thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus was induced by a bovine thrombin injection administered by a microcatheter under distal balloon occlusion for 15 minutes. After one attempt in 3 of 4 swine requiring two attempts, one swine required two attempts, and the sinus recanalization by a second-generation stent retriever was fruitful. Despite complete angiographic recanalization, OCT imaging after thrombectomy revealed regions of persistent sinus luminal thrombus. Thrombosed bridging cortical veins were also discovered before draining into the sinus, as well as patent cortical veins. Given the specifics of venous sinus thrombosis, repurposed devices from arterial stroke may not perform as expected. Despite complete sinus recanalization on angiography, intact coronar thrombus and residual sinus thrombus, as seen on intravascular OCT, may be present, suggesting the source of the poor clinical result amid technical success. Direct chemical thrombolysis may be required to dissolve the remaining clot in the case of bridging cortical vein thrombus following successful sinus thrombus.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.6.jns201795


Decompressive craniectomy in hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis: clinicoradiological features and risk factors

OBJECTIVE Decompressive craniectomy is a life-saving procedure for serious hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis. The authors therefore set out to investigate the potential risk factors for this more severe subtype of CVT as well as provide more details regarding the benefits of DC in patients with hemorrhagic CVT. METHODS The clinical characteristics, radiological findings, and surgical outcomes of patients with severe hemorrhagic CVT who underwent DC therapy in the period from January 2005 to March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed, as well as the risk factors for this disease. The mean time from symptom onset to surgery was 3. 3 days, and 21 patients were enrolled in acute courses. The mean mass lesion volume on neuroimaging was 114. 7 ml on neuroimaging. Nine patients had bilateral lesions, and seven patients had deep CVT. CONCLUSIONS In patients with chronic hemorrhagic CVT, DC is an effective life-saving therapy with positive outcomes in patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.8.jns161112


De novo AVM formation following venous sinus thrombosis and prior AVM resection in adults: report of 2 cases

Individual case reports of de novo AVM formation in both pediatric and adult patients have challenged the orthodox dogma of a congenital origins. Here, the authors discuss 2 cases of de novo AVM formation in adult patients. Following a venous sinus thrombosis, an AVM is generated in the first case, and to the authors' knowledge, it is the first of its kind to be published in the literature. They also present a case in which an elderly patient with a ruptured AVM developed a second AVM in the contralateral hemisphere, 11 years later.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.9.jns161710


Postoperative cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the setting of surgery adjacent to the major dural venous sinuses

OBJECTIVE Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a common complication of surgical procedures near the major venous sinuses. Although the majority of CVSTs are symptomatic, acute sinus thromboses can have devastating consequences. METHODS A prospective review of 74 patients who underwent a retrosigmoid, translabyrinthine, or suboccipital treatment of posterior fossa tumors, as well as a supratentorial craniotomy for sagittal/falcine tumors was done. RESULTS Twenty-four out of 74 patients had postoperative MR venograms confirming CVST, and they were all symptomatic, with some of them being asymptomatic. In the thrombosis group, the rate of CSF leakage was much higher than in the nonthrombosis group. CONCLUSIONS This prospective analysis shows that postoperative CVST's radiographic incidence is higher than that previously reported in retrospective studies. Although no risk factors were found, there may be a correlation between postoperative CVST and CSF leaks.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.4.jns18308


Safety and effectiveness of early chemical deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after spinal cord injury: pilot prospective data

OBJECTIVE Spinal cord injuries affect approximately 17,000 people in the United States each year. In these patients, the average length of hospital stay is 11 days, with deep venous thrombosis rates as high as 65%. There is no agreement on the correct timing of chemical DVT prophylaxis for this critically wounded patient population. Methods and Clinical Data in SCIs is a prospective observational study conducted by the UCSF Brain and Spinal Injury Center's prospective observational research. Regression modeling did not find a correlation between DVT and/or PE and age, American Spinal Injury Association grade, sex, race, or having undergone a neurosurgical procedure. CONCLUSIONS A standardised strategy in which LMWH is given to patients with SCI within 24 hours of injury is cost-effective in preventing venous thromboembolism at the lower end of the estimated range, with zero incidence of adverse bleeding events.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.8.focus17437


Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a call for evidence-based management guidelines

OBJECTIVE POISESIS is uncommon complication of posterior fossa surgery. METHODS The authors completed a retrospective review of all vestibular schwannoma cases that had been treated with microsurgical resection at a single center from December 2011 to September 2017. At the last follow-up, however, all 7 patients had a revised Rankin scale score of 1 on the last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Postoperative CVST is uncommon complication, with an incidence of 6. 0% among 116 patients who had undergone vestibular schwannoma surgery at one hospital. In addition, the handling of postoperative CVST with anticoagulation therapy poses a significant challenge to neurosurgeons. Given the paucity of articles in the literature and the low incidence of CVST, additional studies are required to better understand the origins of thrombus formation and help develop evidence-based CVST management and prevention guidelines.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.4.focus18112


Cerebral venous thrombosis requiring invasive treatment for elevated intracranial pressure in women with combined hormonal contraceptive intake: risk factors, anatomical distribution, and clinical presentation

OBJECTIVE Women using combined hormonal birth control are generally not at risk of cerebral venous thrombosis. The aim of this research is to establish predictive factors for invasive or surgical ICP therapy as well as the potential challenges of nonsurgical approaches in this population. METHODS The authors conducted a two-center, retrospective chart review of 168 cases of CVT in women between 2000 and 2012. Patients with mild or a severe medical course were classified as having undergone a mild or extensive medical course, the latter group including all patients undergoing intensive or surgical ICP therapy and all patients with unfavorable outcome. Six patients needed invasive or surgical ICP therapy. Despite early surgical decompression, three patients developed refractory ICP > 30 mm Hg; 2 of them were treated with barbiturate coma and induced hypothermia, causing infectious, thromboembolic, and hemorrhagic dysfunction; two of them were treated with barbiturate coma and induced hypothermia, with documented infectious, thromboembolic, and hemorrhagic problems; and The transverse sinus thrombosis was less common in patients with unfavorable outcome, with similar distribution in patients requiring either surgical or surgical ICP therapy. CONCLUSIONS The need for invasive or surgical ICP therapy in women taking CHCs with CVT is partially predictable, according to the clinical and radiological findings on admission. Nonsurgical treatments for refractory ICP, such as barbiturate coma and induced hypothermia, are often associated with systemic infectious and hematological disorders and may exacerbate morbidity in this patient population.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.4.focus1891


Endovascular thrombolysis for pediatric cerebral sinus venous thrombosis with tissue plasminogen activator and abciximab

The authors explore the case of a pediatric patient with severe CSVT and who underwent successful recanalization with endovascular tissue plasminogen activator and abciximab. The authors also review the literature on the agents used and success in pediatric patients with CSVT after endovascular thrombolysis. Patients with hypercoagulable blood and in whom the treatment goal is to achieve rapid recanalization and long-term venous patency can be considered.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2013.9.peds13335

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions