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Trace Gas - Crossref

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Last Updated: 09 August 2022

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Variability of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), methanethiol and other trace gases in context of microbial communities from the temperate Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean

We measured DMS and MeSH together with the trace gases carbon monoxide, isoprene, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile in North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean surface waters, with a transect from 57. 2 to 80. 9 N in high spatial resolution in the present study. DMS was the only polar component with higher average in polar than in Atlantic waters, owing to DMS originating from sea ice. Vertical profiles of eight sea-ice stations north of 80°B0 N in the diatom-dominated marginal ice zone showed a strong correlation between DMS and chlorophyll. MeSH's contribution to the sulphur budget was on average 20% higher than previously observed in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, indicating that MeSH is a significant source of sulphur possibly emitted to the atmosphere. Moreover, the relationship between isoprene and chlorophyll with Alcanivorax revealed a strong association with isoprene-producing phytoplankton.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2022-150


Fourier transform and grating-based spectroscopy with a mid-infrared supercontinuum source for trace gas detection in fruit quality monitoring

The spectrometer covers the SC source's spectral bandwidth and provides the highest spectral resolution of 1 GHz in 6 seconds. We use the instrument to analyze fruit-produced volatiles under various atmospheric conditions and compare the results with a previously developed scanning grating-based spectrometer.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1364/oe.418072


Light-induced off-axis cavity-enhanced thermoelastic spectroscopy in the near-infrared for trace gas sensing

The developed OA-CETES sensor, which was tested on a H2O line at 7306. 75 cm -1, attained a minimum detection rate of 8. 7 parts per million for a 300 ms integration time and a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 4. 12 u2129 cm -1 WHz -1/2. The realization of the planned OA-CETES method with compact QTF and long-effective path cavity provides a class of optical sensors with low cost, high sensitivity, and promise for long-distance and multi-point sensing.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1364/oe.430745


Tunable dual-comb spectrometer for mid-infrared trace gas analysis from 3 to 4.7 µm

Dual-frequency comb spectroscopy has emerged as a novel method for analyzing broad spectra with high precision, producing a particularly useful tool for sensitive multi-component gas analysis. Concentration measurements of 5 ppm methane at 3. 9 m, 100 ppm carbon monoxide, and a mixture of 15 ppm carbon monoxide and 5% carbon dioxide at 4. 5 u00b5m are shown with a noise-equivalent absorption coefficient of 6. 4 x 10 Hz u22121/2.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1364/oe.428709


Soil–Atmosphere Exchange of Trace Gases in the Colorado Shortgrass Steppe

Soils can be important sources of greenhouse gases, contributing up to two thirds of atmospheric N2O and more than a quarter of atmospheric CH4. Both CH4 and N2O in the atmosphere can be affected by recent advances in land management and cultivation, which can increase N2O production and/or decrease CH4 uptake, could be contributing to the observed rises of both CH4 and N2O in the atmosphere. Though the absolute number of trace gases released from soils' atmosphere are low, these gases are extremely effective at absorbing infrared radiation. Of the gases exchanged between the soil and atmosphere, the most common reactive ones are oxides of N. Native and N-fertilized soils also contribute to NOx, but large quantities of NOx are also added to the atmosphere. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide play a complex role in atmospheric chemistry.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780195135824.003.0018


Effects of Ocean Acidification on the Marine Source of Atmospherically Active Trace Gases

Organohalogens can influence the atmosphere's oxidizing capacity by interacting with ozone, stratospheric ozone, and global radiative forcing. Both direct and indirect effects of aerosols on climate can be caused by the production of new particles and cloud condensation nuclei in the clean marine atmosphere. As a result of global events, marine trace gases are considered a vital component of the earth's climate system, and shifts in the net production rate and subsequent sea-to-air flux could have a major effect on globally important processes. The oceans are a major source of sulphur, an essential component of all life, and marine emissions of the gas DMS are a primary route in the global biogeochemical cycle. The ability of phytoplankton to produce DMSP varies among species, with prymnesiophytes considered to be the most widespread.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199591091.003.0016


The Impact of Inorganic Trace Gases on Ozone in the Atmosphere

These are followed by a discussion of inorganic halogen cycles that influence the marine boundary layer's ozone chemistry and concluding with a detailed review of Cl atoms and Br atom reactions with VOC species. The reactions leading to the oxidation of inorganic as well as organic sulfur compounds are lengthy, and a brief examination of the effects of sulfur species oxidation in the troposphere and stratosphere are also given. The exchanges of carbon between various u201d variables, including the atmosphere, land, the surface ocean, the intermediate and deep ocean, and the fossil fuel reservoir notwithstanding, are controlled by the processes that produce the global carbon cycle.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190233020.003.0010

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions