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Tidal Marsh - Wiley Online Library

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Last Updated: 03 August 2022

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Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes in a Temperate Tidal Salt Marsh: Comparisons Between Plot and Ecosystem Measurements

Tidal wetlands are made up of several interdependent pathways where measurements of carbon exchange are often scale dependent. Common data collection strategies are intrinsically tied to various geographical and temporal scales, which may lead to inaccurate results for applications of carbon accounting, establishing functional relationships, and predicting future responses to climate change. When comparing measurements of CH4 emissions and CO2 exchange, we reached a good agreement, but this deal was mainly dependent on canopy phenology, with discrepancies mainly present during senescence and dormancy phenophases. CH4 and CO2 fluxes' environmental factors were mostly preserved across various measurement methods, but the number of drivers remained stable, but their individual strength decreased at the ecosystem scale. Comparing to eddy covariance measurements, empirical scaling models parameterized with chamber measurements overestimated annual net ecosystem exchange and gross primary production in comparison to eddy covariance results.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2022JG006943


Strong Dynamics in Tidal Marsh DOC Export in Response to Natural Cycles and Episodic Events From Continuous Monitoring

The role of tidal wetlands as hotspots for carbon and nutrient exchange with adjacent waters has been well documented, but substantial questions remain regarding the physical and biogeochemical controls on these fluxes, which have significant implications on coastal carbon cycling and budgets. This report reveals the variability in lateral wetland dissolved organic fluxes tidally, seasonally, and during extreme weather events for a coastal wetland in northwestern Chesapeake Bay, USA. Continuous flows from the wetland-u2010 draining tidal creek were estimated based on DOC measurements determined in situ with simultaneous water flow data. The study of tidal creek water quality measurements shows seasonal and tidal varying frequencies. Despite summer highs in tidal creek [DOC], monthly DOC fluxes were the highest in early fall due to higher water flows.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2022JG006863


Carbon sequestration in back‐barrier tidal marsh soils

Tidal marshes are wetlands with broad flat wetlands and some of the highest carbon levels of any ecosystem. Although the amount of carbon stored in these soils is undeniable, there are a few questions regarding the systems' carbon sequestration rates. We measured soil organic carbon sequestration rates in three back-u2010barrier tidal marshes in New England to see if a single sequestration value could be used for such marshes. These rates are three to four times higher than the average SOC sequestration rate in New England forests, and they are three to four times higher. The lowest elevation marshes' SOC sequestration rates were much higher than those of the higher elevation marsh. Our results show that there is a significant rise in carbon sequestration within marshes, and that a single sequestration rate is not representative of all marshes in similar situations.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/saj2.20437

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions