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Tidal Marsh - PubMed

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Last Updated: 03 August 2022

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A Conterminous USA-Scale Map of Relative Tidal Marsh Elevation.

Tidal wetlands provide myriad ecosystem services from local to global scales. Supporting a third hypothesis, propagated confusion in Z*MHW increased from north to south as light detection and ranging errors had an outsized effect under narrowing tidal amplitudes. Both median Z*MHW and Z*MHW variability are difficult to determine because several potential causal factors are linked to latitude, but future studies may look at the causes of median Z*MHW and Z*MHW variability, respectively. More than the tidal amplitude, as a result of decreasing the usefulness of using Z*MHW as a flood gauge to microtidal wetlands was noted by watersheds along the Gulf Coast. Future studies may focus on validating and improving these physical map products and using them for synoptic analysis of tidal wetland carbon dynamics and sea-level vulnerability analyses.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-021-01027-9


Sizes of crab burrows regulate water-salt transport of tidal marsh wetlands.

This research seeks to investigate the influence of crab burrows on soil water and salt transport as well as understanding crab burrows' ecological significance in coastal wetlands from the perspective of ecohydrological processes. Consequently, the findings revealed that the number of crab burrow diameters in different areas of the coastal wetland is highly variable, with greater burrow diameters in areas less than 5 meters from the tidal creek and sea-land distances. Large-diameter burrows are more suitable for salt transport due to their preferential water conductivity to the underlying soil vertically and maintain good soil retention capacity. In addition, burrows' positive effects on the water-salt environment of coastal wetland sediments may also provide new coastal wetland restoration concepts.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2022.105691


Accelerated sea-level rise is suppressing CO2 stimulation of tidal marsh productivity: A 33-year study.

Elevated CO2 increased shoot production relative to ambient CO2 for the first two decades for the first two decades, but increased CO2 production from 2005 to 2019 was suspended. Although elevated CO2 elevation as a result of tidal wetland's economic growth can mitigate RSLR's negative impacts on coastal wetland health, coastal wetland resilience will decline in the long run as RSLR's rates increase.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abn0054

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions