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Tidal Marsh - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 03 August 2022

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Stability of a Tidal Marsh Under Very High Flow Velocities and Implications for Nature-Based Flood Defense

However, a new review of historic coastal storms revealed smaller dike breach dimensions if there were no natural, high tidal marshes in front of the dikes. We lack concrete data on the stability of tidal marsh sediments and vegetation under high flow velocities as can occur when a dike behind a marsh breaches. In a flume, the stability of a tidal sediment bed and winter-state vegetation under high flow velocities was tested as a first approximation. During six experimental runs under high flow velocities up to 1. 75 ms-1 and water depth up to 0. 35 m for 2 hours, both sediment bed and vegetation responses were recorded over six experimental runs. The P. australis stems were severely affected by the water flow during the flow exposure, but the majority of all shoots recovered quickly after the flow had stopped.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2022.920480


Biogeomorphic modeling to assess the resilience of tidal-marsh restoration to sea level rise and sediment supply

The restored tidal marsh can keep up with realistic sea level rises and that its resilience is more sensitive to suspended sediments than to sea level rise. Restoration design options can also influence marsh stability, changing the rate and spatial patterns of biogeomorphic development, according to Wesley. We find that by varying the width of two dike breaches, which serve as tidal inlets, to the restored marsh, a greater difference in the width of the two inlets results in higher biogeomorphic diversity in restored habitats. Biogeomorphic modeling can aid in decision making in restoration planning in order to ensure tidal-marsh progress toward sustainable restoration goals, according to this report.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-10-531-2022


Detection of local-scale population declines through optimized tidal marsh bird monitoring design

A key concern for tidal marsh bird species of conservation concern is that finding population declines at local spatial scales within actionable time frames is a top priority. Using count results from 1176 spatially-independent salt marsh sampling stations around the northeastern United States, we investigated and compared the effectiveness of alternative monitoring programs for detecting local-scale population declines. When investigating methods that might influence ability to detect declines, we found that the power within sites was positively linked to species abundance. Hence, we recommend that salt marsh bird monitoring efforts in the northeastern United States include two visits to each site per year, include 15 or more sampling points per site, and monitor monitoring efforts every other year. This strategy will increase the sensitivity of field-level monitoring of tidal marsh birds, which may help with assessments of coastal wetland conservation and habitat management efforts.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2020.e01128


Microbial mechanism for enhanced methane emission in deep soil layer of Phragmites-introduced tidal marsh

Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms and the effects of P. australis' introduction to methane dynamics in the deep soil layer are still unclear. In Suncheon Bay, Republic of Korea, we obtained 1 m deep intact soil cores and gas samples from native Suaeda japonica and P. australis-vegetated temperate tidal salt marshes. In particular, reduced competitive inhibition of sulfate reducers and methanogens in the deep soil layer may have a large role in the increased methane emission as a result of P. australis. Potential methane production was also higher in deeper soil layers than the surface soil layer, which was much higher than the surface soil layer. Deep soil layer, such as P. australis, has a vital role in the methane dynamics of tidal salt marsh, which is introduced by deep root plants. We suggest that deep soil layer plays a vital role in the methane dynamics of tidal salt marsh.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.105251


RGB Indices and Canopy Height Modelling for Mapping Tidal Marsh Biomass from a Small Unmanned Aerial System

Both economic and ecological reasons, Coastal tidal marshes are vital ecosystems. The aim of this research was to establish the use of RGB-based vegetation indices for determining and monitoring tidal marsh vegetation biomass. On a quadcopter sUAS near vegetation peak growth, photographs were taken across tidal marsh study sites. At the study site's fertilized marsh plots, high biomass was predicted at the fertilized marsh plots. The suggested biomass model in low marsh does not do as well as the high marsh that is close to shore and ready for biomass sampling due to a lack of biomass samples in the inner estuary. To better understand the right conditions for S. alterniflora biomass estimation using sUAS as an on-demand, personal remote sensing device, more research in low marsh is needed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173406


Evaluating tidal marsh sustainability in the face of sea-level rise: a hybrid modeling approach applied to San Francisco Bay.

We used this model to San Francisco Bay, using best-available elevation data and estimates of sediment supply and organic matter accumulation developed for 15 Bay subregions. Model results were used spatially to analyze eight Bay-wide climate change scenarios, with sediment concentrations greater than 200 mg/L. The model forecast a change in the mix of intertidal habitats under various conditions, including a loss of high marsh and gains in low marsh and mudflats, despite a high-SLR scenario.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0027388


Macroinvertebrate Prey Availability and Fish Diet Selectivity in Relation to Environmental Variables in Natural and Restoring North San Francisco Bay Tidal Marsh Channels

Tidal marsh wetlands provide essential foraging habitat for a variety of estuarine fishes. In the San Francisco Estuary, little is known about the abundance and distribution of interior marsh macroinvertebrate populations. We describe seasonal, regional, and location variation in the presence and abundance of neuston and benthic macroinvertebrates that live in tidal marsh channels, as well as environmental conditions. Six marsh sites located in three river systems of the northern estuary's north estuary, including the Petaluma River and the west Delta, were sampled annually from October 2003 to June 2005. Our findings show that local-scale site impacts and marsh position within the estuary influence invertebrate community membership and abundance. When planning and designing tidal marsh restoration programs, particularly those targeted for food web support, we recommend that managers concentrate on the ability of restoring marshes to produce food subsidies for target species.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/129a7fde5b1441f492307137477fceb5


Vegetation Development in a Tidal Marsh Restoration Project during a Historic Drought: A Remote Sensing Approach

However, the influence of weather variability on restoration results is not well understood in Mediterranean ecosystems, drought years, wet years, and their subsequent effect on salinity levels. During California's historic drought, vegetation increased at a rate of 1,979 m2/year, 10. 4 times slower than the rate of 20,580 m2/year between 2009 and 2011, when the state was not in drought, but not in drought. Our findings reveal that adaptive monitoring efforts in variable climates should take into account the effects of weather on tidal wetland ecosystems, and that high-resolution remote sensing can be a useful method of determining these dynamics.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2017.00243


Modeling tidal marsh distribution with sea-level rise: evaluating the role of vegetation, sediment, and upland habitat in marsh resiliency.

We investigated marsh resiliency amid these uncertainties using the Marsh Equilibrium Model, a mechanistic, elevation-based soil cohort model, with a rich data set of plant growth and physical characteristics from locations around the estuarine salinity gradient. Wesimulated marsh accretion across vegetated elevations for 100 years, using the findings to high-resolution digital elevation maps to quantify potential shifts in marsh distributions for the first time. Marshhes in the United States changed to low marsh elevations with a century sea-level rise of 100 and 165 cm; mid- and high marsh elevations were only in former uplands. In comparison to more saline sites with lower growth, low salinity brackish marshes with abundant vegetation had slower elevation loss in comparison to older saline marshes with lower productivity. The importance of including vegetation responses to sea-level rise is shown by elevation estimates using the Marsh Equilibrium Model.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088760


Invasion Age and Invader Removal Alter Species Cover and Composition at the Suisun Tidal Marsh, California, USA

Plant species invasions are highly damaging species composition and ecosystem function in Wetland ecosystems. In the brackish tidal marshes of Suisun Marsh within the Estuary, perennial pepperweed was identified along a gradient of invasion age in this research. Residents plant cover increased during the 2-year study period, particularly in the densest and oldest areas of the perennial pepperweed colonies, though species richness did not change significantly.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/d3020235

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions