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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome - Crossref

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Last Updated: 05 August 2022

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Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome, involving the brachial plexus along its course from the cervical spine to the axilla, is a entrapment neuropathy involving the brachial plexus. In the lower trunk territory, the clinical presentation includes cervical and upper extremity pain as well as neurologic signs and symptoms. Surgical intervention is often characterized by brachial plexus neurolysis and the removal of compression points by the supraclavicular approach.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190617127.003.0008


Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

As it travels from the exiting nerve roots to the axilla, neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is triggered by compression of the brachial plexus. Patients are still suffering as a result of diagnosis delay, and physicians are still suffering, as a result of the increasing use of healthcare services. Treatment options are widely available and can contribute to a dramatic improvement in the patient's quality of life. Increased knowledge of nTOS will eventually lead to its proper diagnosis and treatment.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190271787.003.0008


Long-term outcomes after surgical treatment of pediatric neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome

OBJECTIVE Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is unusual compression syndrome of the brachial plexus that causes pain, sensory changes, and motor weakness in the affected limb. Over a 6-year period, the authors reviewed the scientific evidence and findings in their series of pediatric patients with surgically treated nTOS. METHODS The METHODS cases of nTOS in patients aged 18 years or younger were obtained for analysis using a prospective database of peripheral nerve operations. RESULTS Twelve patients with 14 cases of nTOS surgically treated between April 2010 and December 2016 were identified, according to a review. Patients who had pain relief after surgery were found to be significantly younger and to have a shorter duration of preoperative symptoms than patients with worse outcomes. 1 patient developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously, 1 patient suffered a transient increase in pain that resolved spontaneously; 1 patient developed a minor infection that resolved spontaneously; and 1 patient fell at home, with temporary pain in the surgically treated extremity. CONCLUSION Pediatric nTOS suffers with disabling pain and is more often associated with bony anomalies than adult nTOS. Excellent pain relief is seen in younger patients who are scheduled for early surgical examination in carefully selected patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.7.peds17257


Percutaneous Thrombectomy in the Management of Early Rethrombosis in Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Two Case Reports

Paget/u2013Schroetter syndrome, or effort thrombosis, is a form of pulmonary thrombosis in the upper limb causing deep venous thrombosis. Case study Two cases of early rethrombosis are successfully treated with percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using two different methods are described. Even when thrombolysis therapy is prohibited, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices may provide a safe treatment option for patients with recurrent thrombosis following thoracic outlet surgery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-404520/v1


Two-surgeon approach to thoracic outlet syndrome: long-term outcome

After doing the preoperative examinations in conjunction with a neurologist, an orthopaedic surgeon and a vascular surgeon jointly conducted 30 surgeries for thoracic outlet syndrome in 27 patients. Except in one case where the infraclavicular route was used, Anterior scalenectomy was performed by the supraclavicular route, except in one instance where the infraclavicular route was used. A resection of cervical rib or band, or medial scalenectomy may be required.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/014107689909200507


Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: current diagnostic criteria and advances in MRI diagnostics

The brachial plexus is compressed as it travels from the thoracic outlet to the axilla, resulting in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. The authors explore the latest diagnostic criteria, provide update on the latest surgical findings, and provide case examples illustrating how MR neurography can help in diagnosing nTOS. The authors argue that improved high-resolution MRN and tractography are useful in determining nerve compression in patients with nTOS and can extend current diagnostic techniques for this disorder.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.6.focus15219


Thoracic Outlet Syndrome after Minimally Invasive Repair of Pectus Excavatum in a 15-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report

Abstract Nuss treatment has become the treatment of choice in pectus excavatum largely because of the excellent functional and cosmetic results. The patient recovered arm and hand function after 7 months. Abrupt structural changes of the thoracic cavity with prominent elevation of the upper chest arousing a TOS and should be recognized as one potential Nuss procedure complication. Conservative management can be a cost-effective alternative to bar removal, with promising results on functional recovery in early stages of compression.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-1748316


Bilateral Thoracic Outlet Syndrome from Anomalous 8th Cervical Vertebrae Ribs

A cervical rib can be found in the transverse process of the 7th cervical vertebra's transverse process, causing a cervical rib in 30 percent of the general population. Tos from a cervical rib arising from a supernumerary 8th cervical vertebra is the first case in the literature of neurogenic TOS from a cervical rib.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-1753541


Ultrasonography-Guided Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment for a Patient With Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Abstract: Patients with thoracic outlet syndrome can be treated with osteopathic manipulative therapy to eliminate pain and muse restriction of the pectoralis minor muscle, which may result in compression of the brachial plexus. PMM deformation and brachial plexus compression in a 32-year-old woman with thoracic outlet syndrome who was successfully treated with OMT was identified in the present study. The pectoral bowing ratio fell below the normal range in a second neuromuscular U. S. exam, which meant that PMM deformation had been resolved.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2011.111.9.543

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions