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Testicular Cancer - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 05 August 2022

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Multidisciplinary Etiologic Study of Familial Testicular Cancer

BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell tumor is the most common cancer in men aged 20 to 35 in men aged 20 to 35, with an increasing prevalence since the mid-twentieth century. A family history of TGCT is attributed to an elevated risk of the disease. OBJECTIVES: Ascertain new families with familial testicular germ cell tumors. Determine the underlying genetic code for susceptibility to TGCT in families, with one primary aim being to find, and then clone, the hereditary testicular cancer gene that has been mapped to chromosome Xq27. Individuals of both genders from a family with at least two cases of documented GCT in blood relatives, as well as at least one of the GCT cases in their families are willing to enroll in the research. Both males with a history of TGCT have a monozygotic twin brother. If vital informative family members lacking surviving spouses and children are unable to provide germ line DNA, minor children under the age of 12 will not be eligible for study participation. About 40 families are planning to visit the NIH Clinical Center, which is an estimated accrual of 75 and 100 new TGCT families over a 5-year period. Individuals and families will be invited to complete baseline questionnaires as well as questionnaires on fitness, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors that relate to being part of a high-risk family as well as gene mapping and cloning efforts. Tumor tissue can be obtained whenever possible.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00034424


Short-term Testosterone Replacement in Testicular Cancer Survivors to Treat Overweight and Improve Cardiometabolic Risk: A Pilot Study

Rationale: Testicular cancer survivors have an elevated risk of hypogonadism and cardiovascular disease. TC survivors with the metabolic syndrome have a higher body mass index pretreatment, a larger BMI rise during follow-up, and lower total testosterone levels than those without the metabolic syndrome. The aim: to investigate the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on fat mass and other metabolic syndrome features. Results of this pilot study will be used to design a multicenter random controlled study in a large group of TC patients, aged 18-55 years, at least 12 months after starting curative therapy with unilateral orchidectomy and platinum-based chemotherapy, and having a fasting total testosterone level of u226612 kg/m2. Patients will be randomized to testosterone gel or placebo gel once daily for 20 weeks, followed by 20 weeks of active Androgel therapy in all participants. Androgel compared to placebo was the change in fat mass as measured by Dual-Energy X-ray Absorption scan after 20 weeks of Androgel compared to placebo. The investigation will show whether testosterone replacement therapy as a short-term therapy has significant effects on obesity and fat metabolism, as well as reducing the incidence of the metabolic syndrome in this group of young men with good long-term cancer-related prognosis, but an elevated risk of CVD.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03339635

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions