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South Carolina - Wiley Online Library

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Last Updated: 28 July 2022

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Mottled Duck introductions to South Carolina: The ugly, the bad, and the good?

Abstract Abstract: Translocations or other movements of wildlife often achieve their intended objectives, but unexpected consequences can arise and undermine locally adopted ecological ecosystems, restructure or dilute genetic stability of populations or subspecies of the species, or otherwise negatively influence a species's long-lived species's long-term survival. Two historical Mottled Duck populations persist and are endemic to Mexico and the West Coast of the United States and Florida, with two historical populations of Mottled Ducks endemic to both Mexico and the West Coast areas of the United States and Florida. According to new data, the Mottled Duck population in South Carolina is on the rise, with an increasing number of Mottled Ducks in South Carolina and possibly dispersing into Georgia.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.8850


Long‐term hydro‐meteorology and water quality data from low‐gradient catchments of varying scales on the Santee experimental Forest, South Carolina

Extreme precipitation events, tropical storms, earthquakes, drought, and increasing urbanization impacting vegetation, road infrastructure, water extraction, and other related ecosystem processes and functions are all impacting the forest landscape of the United States' southern Atlantic coastal plain. These data support numerous field and modelling studies, ranging from water and carbon budgets to hydrologic and biogeochemical reactions, to the effects of microtopography and extreme climate on coastal catchments that have survived since Hurricane Hugo. One of Hugo's most notable findings from the long-running data was a reversal of the pre-u2010Hugo flow pattern in the paired watersheds. Forest vegetation remained unchanged for ten years, with hurricane damage to older pine and larger hardwood stands delayed until complete forest regeneration.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hyp.14549

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions