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Smoking Cessation - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 26 July 2022

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Smartphone Application for Smoking Cessation (Quit with US): A Randomized Controlled Trial among Young Adult Light Smokers in Thailand

This research was conducted to determine the popularity of a smartphone application named Quit with young adult smokers in the United States. By simple randomization procedure, a total of 273 people were assigned to the Quit without either the intervention group or the control group, instead of the control group. In addition, the intervention group's participants were encouraged to use Quit with the United States. The primary abstinence result was the exhaled CO concentration level, which showed 7-day point prevalence abstinence. According to the Heaviness of Smoking Index score, daily smokers, who were most identified as daily smokers, consumed u226410 cigarettes a day, and reported a low level of nicotine dependence. Participants in the Quitt with U. S. intervention group reported a significantly higher smoking absorption rate than those in the control group, according to intention-to-treat studies. In conclusion, Quit with U. S. improved smoking cessation rates among young adult light smokers who consume u2264 10 cigarettes per day.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148265


Evolution of a Systematic Approach to Smoking Cessation in Ontario’s Regional Cancer Centres

A person's prognosis, treatment success, and safety can be greatly enhanced by smoking cessation after a cancer diagnosis, as well as quality of life. Cancer Care Ontario introduced a Framework for Smoking Cessation in 2012, which will be expanded to new ambulatory cancer patients at the province's 14 Regional Cancer Centres. Both indicators are routinely monitored as part of Ontario Health's system-wide performance management program, which has been identified as a key factor in RCC change. RCCs that were able to maintain a high level of smoking cessation services during the pandemic have valuable lessons to teach, including how to effectively leverage virtual care. The COVID-19 system recovery process will be paramount. Patients must still receive the highest quality cancer care, so that they receive the maximum health benefits from their treatments.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29070365


Effectiveness of the national German quitline for smoking cessation: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

Abstract Background: Despite the decline in cigarette use in the German adult population over the past two decades, tobacco use is still prevalent in the German adult population, accounting for 125,000 deaths annually and raising major social costs, with a large number of social issues. Evidence-based tobacco cessation techniques are crucial to a national tobacco control initiative, and can help reduce the prevalence of tobacco use. The present research investigates the success of the national German Smokers Quitline, which offers cessation assistance to smokers. During an intervention period of about six weeks, participants will receive up to six proactive phone calls during the intervention period. The integrated treatment will incorporate elements of motivational interviewing and those of the cognitive behavioral approach to treating drug use. After three and a month, smoking cessation rates in the telephone counseling condition will be higher than in the control condition relative to the control group.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-13742-4


A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Comprehensive Smoking-Cessation Interventions Based on the Community and Hospital Collaboration

Background: The use of smoking cessation clinics is particularly poor in China, with the prevalence of cigarette smoking in China high. Multicomponent smoking cessation programs that involve community and hospital cooperation have the ability to raise the smoking cessation rate. MethodsWe conducted a smoking cessation trial in 19 community health service centers in Beijing, China, but the cost-effectiveness of this intervention scheme is unknown. The cigarette cessation rate in the CI group was 30. 0% in the CI group and 22. 2 percent in the PI group after six months of follow-up. Both the PI group and the CI group's intervention tactics were found to be cost-effective, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $ 535. 62/QALY and $366. 19/QALY, respectively. The CI scheme, which was based in hospitals and communities in China, was always the most cost-effective intervention, according to a probabilistic sensitivity study, and it was always the most cost-effective intervention. Conclusion: The CI program, based in hospital and community, is more cost-effective than PI alone.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2022.853438


Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk and smoking cessation changes induced by CHRNA5-A3 and CHRNB3-A6 variation in a Chinese male population

Most studies in the field of CHRNA5-A3 and CHRNB3-A6 have only focused on lung cancer risk; however, the links between persistent obstructive pulmonary disease risk and smoking cessation are less understood, particularly in the Chinese male population. DNA extraction and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping were applied to 823 male patients with COPD and 435 smoking male healthy control controls in this research. p 0. 001; rs4950 AG genotypes were highly associated with increased rates of successful smoking cessation in comparison to the TT genotype [adjusted odds ratio = 0. 56 percent CI = 0. 60-0. 76]; pp 0. 001; 0. 05= 0. 001. We discovered that CHRNA5-A3 and CHRNB3-A6 were both strongly linked to successful smoking cessation in COPD patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2478/bjmg-2019-0018


Service user perceptions of smoking cessation in residential substance use treatment.

Preval of nicotine use among adults in substance misuse therapy is much higher than that of the wider population, but no studies is available, and residential therapy services have been largely ignored as a potential setting for cessation efforts. Participants were asked about their smoking habits, factors relating to smoking and smoking cessation, and the connection between smoking and substance use. Conclusions This report shows that service users' residential treatment facilities are appropriate settings for implementing smoking cessation. To satisfy adult customers who smoke and are recovering from heroin use, further study and collaboration from treatment agencies is required to properly integrate substance misuse and smoking cessation services.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0270045


Implementing a smoking cessation intervention for people experiencing homelessness: Participants' preferences, feedback, and satisfaction with the 'power to quit' program.

Background: Smoking rates in communities experiencing homelessness are three times higher than those in the general population. It's often difficult to find smoke cessation products for people who are homeless. The patch and counseling were the top-ranked intervention component, with 54. 3 percent reporting that the program was extremely helpful; 56. 3 percent said that calling phone calls or emails were the most useful for appointment reminders. The high rate of satisfaction among African American participants may be due in part to racial concordance among participants, research workers, and the community advisory board. Including staff that have a shared lived experience with participants in a smoking cessation study can raise the participant satisfaction in those studies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268653


National Cancer Institute Smoking Cessation at Lung Examination Trials Brief Report: Baseline Characteristics and Comparison With the U.S. General Population of Lung Cancer Screening–Eligible Patients

Introduction: The National Cancer Institute Smoking Cessation at Lung Examination Collaboration in Lung Examination Collaboration has eight clinical trials examining smoke cessation treatments in lung cancer screening. In three national representative polls in the United States, this study compared pooled participant baseline demographic and smoking characteristics of seven SCALE trials to LCS-eligible smokers. Methods: Baseline variables from 3614 smokers who were participating in SCALE trials as of September 2020 were compared to pooled data from the Tobacco Use Supplement, National Health Interview Survey, and Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health using the U. S. Preventive Services Task Force 2013 and 2021 LCS eligibility criteria, which were compared to the U. S. Preventive Services Task Force 2013 and 2021 LCS eligibility criteria. Results: SCALE participants have similar average age as the U. S. LCS (u2013eligible smokers) based on the 2013 guidelines, but they are 2. 8 years older using the 2021 standards. Participants in SCALE's average of 17. 9 cigarettes per day, compared to 22. 4 using the 2013 criteria and 19. 6 using the 2021 criteria.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtocrr.2022.100352


Association between family or peer views towards tobacco use and past 30-day smoking cessation among adults with mental health problems

Adults with mental health problems have a greater risk of cigarette smoking. We looked at the link between family or peer attitudes toward nicotine use, as well as the end of 30-day cessation among adult with mental health problems who smoke. We used nationally representative results from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study to determine this relationship. To determine mental health, we used the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs Short Screener questionnaire. Compared to participants with negative or positive attitudes toward nicotine use and the previous 30-day smoking cessation, logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in the relationship between family and peer opinions on tobacco use and the recent 30-day smoking cessation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2022.101886


The Effect of Fear of COVID-19 on Smoking Cessation

Aim: We wanted to explore the connection between COVID-19 and smoking cessation success. It was conducted prospectively, and we included people who applied to the smoking cessation outpatient clinic between 01 October 2020 and September 2020 who agreed to participate in the study. Participants were called in the 1st month and 3rd months from the smoking cessation day to enquire if they stopped smoking. The Fear of COVID-19 Scale's mean score was calculated as 18. 77 percentu00b16. 45. In the 3rd month, the success rate of smoking cessation was 55%. Smoking cessation success was found to be no correlation between the Fear of COVID-19 Scale's score and the success of smoking cessation. Conclusion: Although we are unable to relate it to COVID-19 alone, we believe that thepandemic contributes to the success of early smoking cessation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.33880/ejfm.2022110202

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions