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Sleep Paralysis - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 18 April 2022

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Sleep Paralysis and psychopathology

In this research, orthopaedic patients and patients with multiple somatic complaints as examples of people living through difficult life experiences, a test of the likelihood that it may be influenced by stressful life circumstances is presented. Objectives: The study's objectives were to determine the prevalence of sleep paralysis in samples of orthopaedic patients and patients with multiple somatic complaints in samples and determine if these rates were significantly higher than those in healthy people. This investigation also sought to determine if there was evidence of psychopathology among orthopaedic patients, and if so, to determine if there was a significant difference in the degree of psychopathology between the orthopaedic patients and patients with multiple somatic complaints. Conclusions: Isolated sleep paralysis was detected in 28 percent of the healthy patients, 44% of orthopaedic patients, and 56% of patients with multiple somatic complaints.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v15i4.185


Sleep Paralysis: Historical, Psychological, and Medical Perspectives by Brian A. Sharpless and Karl Doghramji

Sleep paralysis is an interculturally occurring phenomenon with a psychophysiological and neurophysiological basis, which has many and varied culture-specific interpretations. Despite its relatively high prevalence—the prevalence rate is usually estimated at about 8% but with varying degrees of nationality and subgroup varies widely, and is therefore uncertain—this phenomenon that is normally related to sleep disorders receives little attention in sleep medicine. Typical SP features include: temporary muscle atonia in conjunction with conscious knowledge, the sensation of pressure on the chest, and the presence of visual or auditory hallucinations, often followed by feelings of suffocation and extreme anxiety. In his Foreword, Charles F. Reynolds aptly stated it in his Foreword that it is remarkable that humanistic and cultural aspects are also considered so that a "magnificent blend of humanistic and scientific medicine" is emerging.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/7ce779720410488f98c646a004726963


What do we know about sleep paralysis?

Introduction: Sleep deficiency is a common disease that is present in a wide variety of cultures around the world. The disorder's clinical appearance can be very diverse. With the illness, there is always a feeling of stuttering in the body as a result of impaired consciousness. However, most theories describing this phenomenon are based on the assumption that it results from a lack of REM sleep and wakefulness in a dysfunctional network.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2478/cpp-2018-0014


Two Cases of Narcoleptic Patients with Sleep Paralysis as a Chief Complaint

While a subject is fully awake, sleep paralysis is considered as a dissociated state in which rapid eye movement muscle atonia appears. Sleep paralysis in narcolepsy patients is estimated to be 20-to-45%. Since working with patients with sleep paralysis, clinicians must carefully investigate the presence or absence of narcoleptic signs when treating patients with sleep paralysis, and physicians should perform multiple sleep latency tests to establish the diagnosis of narcolepsy if necessary.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.17241/smr.2018.00311


Lucid Dreaming, Nightmares, and Sleep Paralysis: Associations With Reality Testing Deficits and Paranormal Experience/Belief

This paper, which focuses on lucid dreaming, insomnia testing, and paranormal experiences/beliefs. Objects: This paper investigated relationships between dissociated dreams related to rapid eye movement sleep, reality testing, and paranormal beliefs/beliefs. focusing on lucid dreaming. Sleep and paranormal results were not significant, with positive correlations between sleep and paranormal results being low. Paranormal results that are correlated more closely to sleep indices are somewhat related to sleep indices. Paranormal experience was correlated with clear dreams, terrors, and sleep paralysis, whereas normal belief related only to nightmares and sleep paralysis. The Auditory and Visual Hallucinations sub-factor of the IPO-RT demonstrated the strongest positive results with sleep studies. Auditory and Visual Hallucinations had significant positive results related to REM sleep, according to 3-Dual sleep simulation results, while normal experience did not. Findings revealed that self-generated, cost-effective cognitive-processes played a significant role in conscious control and recognition of lucid dreaming and associated dissociative sleep states.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00471


Sleep paralysis in Brazilian folklore and other cultures: a brief review

Sleep paralysis is primarily during awakening and is a dissociative state. Most people experience SP rarely, but typically when sleeping in a supine position; however, SP is classified as a disorder when recurrent and/or related to emotional distress. A female demon attacks during dreams and causes paralysis in N. . . . ian culture. The report on alien abductions, which occurs as a result of inability to move during awakenings linked to visual hallucinations of aliens, is a modern adaptation of SP. In addition, SP is a good example of how a particular biological phenomenon can be understood and shaped by various cultural contexts. Pisadeira's crone with long fingers who lurks on rooftops at night and tramples on the chest of those who sleep on a full stomach with the stomach. We first discuss the SP's neuropsychological and then introduce the Pisadeira's folk tale.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01294


How to make the ghosts in my bedroom disappear? Focused-attention meditation combined with muscle relaxation (MR therapy)—a direct treatment intervention for sleep paralysis

Sleep paralysis is a typical condition of compulsory immobility that occurs at sleep onset or abandon. I propose for the first time a form of specialized inward-attention meditation combined with muscle relaxation as a direct threat to be deployed during the assault to be able to improve and possibly eliminate it. The intervention leads to a shift in attention from unpleasant external and internal signals to a more pleasant internal object. The procedure may also reduce the initial anxiety and arousal that occur when one is astonished. In addition, I present a novel Panic-Hallucination Model of Sleep Paralysis, describing how an alarming cycle of anxiety and panic-like autonomic arousal leads to a positive feedback loop that perpetuates the threat, fuels terror-like autonomic anxiety, and contributes to future SP episodes. Several cases are shown to show the advisability of MR therapy for SP.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00028


Meditation-Relaxation (MR Therapy) for Sleep Paralysis: A Pilot Study in Patients With Narcolepsy

Sleep paralysis is a disorder in which a person is paralyzed on awakening or falling asleep. SP afflicts 20% of individuals, and it is also one of the most common signs of narcolepsy. During SP, the sleeper may experience hallucinations. SP is unsurprisingly linked with heightened anxiety around the world. We wanted to determine, with a small-scale pilot study, the safety of MR therapy for SP in patients with narcolepsy. Ten patients with narcolepsy and SP were enrolled in the study. SP medication therapy, which was used for eight weeks, resulted in a dramatic decrease in the number of days SP occurred; and the number of SP episodes in the last month of the study; unlike the control intervention. Although the study was conducted in patients with narcolepsy, we cautiously suggest that the findings may extend to people with isolated SP.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2020.00922


Prevalence and Clinical Picture of Sleep Paralysis in a Polish Student Sample

Sleep desynchrony in the architecture of rapid eye movement sleep caused temporary insomnia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SP among Polish students in Lublin using self-reported online polls, the prevalence of SP-related somatic and psychopathologic signs, and the causes potentially contributing to symptoms in people with SP. SP in the Polish student population was marginally higher than the average prevalence in other student groups, according to our estimates. The number of SP episodes related to sleep duration and supine position during sleep.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103529

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions