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Schwannoma - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 18 September 2022

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Long-term growth patterns of vestibular schwannomas after stereotactic radiotherapy: delayed re-growth

Purpose The long-term outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannomas after stereotactic radiosurgery who experience delayed tumour regrowth were unknown. We included patients with VS and delayed regrowth as a first reaction to SRS and delayed regrowth by analyzing a database of 735 patients with VS and 159 patients with SRS as sole therapy. In each case, we documented the post-SRS clinical study, pre- and post-SRS VS size as per MRI in pre-determined time periods, response to care, growth rate, and final outcome. Conclusions We found six patients with positive initial response but VS regrowth at a faster rate than pre-SRS, although pre-SRS patients had a longer survival duration. Despite this unusual VS pattern following SRS, VS do not increase again; despite this unusual occurrence, patients must be made aware of the potential of this unusual VS behaviour following SRS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-022-07281-2


Cochlear implant in vestibular schwannomas: long-term outcomes and critical analysis of indications

Purpose: To describe our hospital experience in cochlear transplantation following vestibular schwannoma resection, and to compare the audiological results of sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 2 versus sub-cohorts of patients, as well as preoperative contralateral hearing. Methods Seventeen patients who had undergone VS resection and cochlear implant were reviewed retrospectively. The positive prognostic factor for CI's success on open-set discrimination was a good preoperative contralateral hearing status. Conclusions The good contralateral hearing adversely influences the CI process and should be considered when selecting patients with sporadic or NF2-associated VS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-021-07243-0


The study of predictive factors for the evolution of vestibular schwannomas

Purpose The primary aim of the study was to determine whether textural heterogeneity of vestibular schwannomas on MRI at diagnosis was predictive of their radiological evolution. Patient results are divided into two groups, one group representing 39 "stable patients" and the other containing the remaining 39 "protestive patients"" have been divided into two groups. Hearing loss of 2 years was identified as a prognostic factor for tumor progression with a dramatic trend — among the clinical or radiological signs of concern. Conclusions This report did not find an association between texture analysis and vestibular schwannomas growth.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-022-07651-w


A mechanistic mathematical model of initiation and malignant transformation in sporadic vestibular schwannoma

Background The vestibular schwannoma is a rare, benign tumor of the eighth cranial nerve, often involving mutations of the gene NF2 gene. Previously developed mathematical models of schwannoma incidence have not attempted to account for changes in particular genes, and researchers were unable to distinguish between nonsense mutations and loss of heterozygosity. Schwann cells have been analyzed for the base-pair mutation rate. 10u221210 for example, and the rate of LOH = 2. 03 u00d4 10 yr has been found in new estimates for the base-pair mutation rate u = 4. 48 u2312/yr.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01955-8


Laparoscopic partial cystectomy through extraperitoneal space for primary bladder schwannoma

Background Schwannomas can occur in the body where nerve sheaths are present. Genitourinary schwannomas are extremely unusual, especially primary bladder schwannomas. Case study A 39-year-old man had no change in symptoms as a result of frequent urination and urgency for one month after prostatitis therapy for 2 weeks. A mass in the left side wall of the bladder that had no boundaries and protruded outward from the bladder was shown by ultrasound and computed tomography. Conclusions Bladder schwannomas are medically uncommon benign bladder lesions with no definite clinical signs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40001-022-00796-8


Middle fossa approach for a facial nerve schwannoma: how I do it

Background The facial nerve schwannomas can extend to the middle fossa or the cerebellopontine position through the labyrinthine and cisternal segments of the facial nerve. The middle fossa approach and its extensions provide a flexible way to cope with a large number of lesions present in the middle and posterior cranial fossa junction, which is why the middle fossa approach and its extensions are recommended.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00701-022-05199-6


Combined endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid and sublabial transmaxillary approaches for a large infratemporal fossa trigeminal schwannoma

In recent years, the endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid tactic has been touted as a viable treatment for TSs in the infratemporal haze. Methods We'll explore the EETPA's steps as well as the sublabial transmaxillary technique used for the surgical removal of a massive mandibular schwannoma of the ITF.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00701-022-05327-2


The “Deep Subarcuate Fossa” sign and three types of anomalous subarcuate loops encountered during vestibular schwannoma removal

The aim of this research was to identify three specific SLs that occurred during VS removal and to identify the u201d sign and its importance in the diagnosis and treatment of an osseous-penetrating SL. Methods We prospectively followed 963 patients with newly diagnosed VS who underwent surgical intervention by the senior author from 2012 to 2021, finding 16 patients with unusually high SL. The SF in 7 patients with a type III anomalous SL ranged from 2. 3 to 7. 0 mm, which was significantly higher than in 845 patients without an osseous-penetrating SL. The presence of a type III anomalous SL can be predicted by the depth of the AICA in the bone and guide the flogging of the bone around the vessel loop, according to the u201d sign.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00701-022-05288-6


Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of hypoglossal schwannoma: a multi-institutional retrospective study

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a minimally invasive technique that may lead to long-term tumor monitoring for patients with HS, particularly those who are allergic or unable for surgery. After SRS performed for both newly diagnosed and residual tumors after incomplete resection, this research evaluates the results. Tumor control was achieved in 11 patients, according to a median imaging follow-up of 37 months. At the 6-month follow-up in one patient, Tumor enlargement that was surgically treated with surgical resection was noted. In nine patients, a median clinical follow-up of 30. 5 months, stability, or enhancement of all pre-SRS signs and symptoms was observed. In one patient and tongue atrophy in two patients, the New-onset trapezius weakness was noted. Following subcutaneous resection and at HS recurrence, SRS may be a useful alternative to surgery for patients with HS or as an adjuvant therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00701-022-05187-w


Extracranial Schwannomas of the Head and Neck: A Literature Review and Audit of Diagnosed Cases Over a Period of Eight Years

Schwannoma is a benign, slow-growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumor that arises from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Schwannomas may cause similar head and neck disorders, such as infection, tumor, or metastasis. Extracranial schwannomas are unusual; in this review, we review a collection of 22 cases of schwannomas that occur in the head and neck area over a period of eight years. Four cases of schwannomas occurred in the tongue and lower lip, three in the buccal mucosa, parapharyngeal space, and eyebrow, and one each in the upper lip, lateral canthus of the eye, submandibular gland, and ear. Schwannomas can be seen in a variety of locations throughout the head and neck.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12105-022-01415-y

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions