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Rheumatoid Arthritis - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 22 June 2022

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Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of disorders involving joint inflammation that first appear before the age of 16. In one or two joints, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis causes inflammation. Individuals with systemic arthritis may also have a skin rash or enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, or spleen. The occurrence of arthritis in four or fewer joints in the first 6 months of the disease is identified by Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Individuals with oligoarthritis are at an elevated risk of developing inflammation of the eye. The Rheumatoid factor positiv polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis causes inflammation in five or more joints within the first six months of the disease. Individuals with this disease also have a positive blood test for proteins known as rheumatoid factors. This type of arthritis closely mimics rheumatoid arthritis as seen in adults. Rheumatoid factor negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis is also characterized by arthritis in five or more joints within the first six months of the disease. Psoriatic juvenile idiopathic arthritis has arthritis that often occurs in conjunction with a skin disorder called psoriasis. Psoriasis is a condition that is characterized by patches of red, irritated skin that are often obscured by flaky white scales. Some affected individuals experience psoriasis before arthritis, while others experience arthritis first. Enthesitis-related arthritis may also cause inflammation in areas of the body other than the joints. Undifferentiated arthritis is the most common form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/juvenile-idiopathic-arthritis


Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that causes persistent chronic inflammation, primarily impacting the joints. Joints are usually affected in a symmetrical fashion; for example, if joints in the hand are affected, both hands tend to be involved. People with rheumatoid arthritis frequently complain that their joint pain and stiffness is the most severe when getting out of bed in the morning or after a long rest. Rheumatoid arthritis may also cause inflammation of other organs and organs, such as the eyes, lungs, and blood vessels. In mid- to late adulthood, rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms usually appear in mid- to late adulthood. Many affected individuals have episodes of gastrointestinal symptoms followed by periods without having any symptoms for the remainder of their lives. In severe cases, patients with chronic health problems relating to the disease have suffered with persistent health problems for many years.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/rheumatoid-arthritis


Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia

Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPP) is a joint disorder that progresses with age. Permanently bent fingers, increased finger and knee joints, and a reduced amount of space between the bones at the hip and knee joints are all typical signs and symptoms that develop with time. Hip pain is a common problem in adolescence. People with PPRD are of normal length at birth, but by adulthood, they are usually shorter than their peers. Normally affected adults also have abnormal calcium deposits around the elbow, knee, and hip joints, as well as spine-limited mobility in all joints, including spine joints. PPRD is often mistaken for another joint disorder that affects young people referred to as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. However, the joint problems in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are related to inflammation, while those in PPRD are not.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/progressive-pseudorheumatoid-dysplasia


Sjögren syndrome

Sju00f6gren syndrome is a condition that has two main features: dry eyes and a dry mouth. Sju00f6gren syndrome is categorized as an autoimmune disease, one of a large group of conditions that arise when the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. Dry eyes may lead to itching, burning, a feeling of sand in the eyes, blurry vision, or the avoidance of bright or fluorescent lighting. A dry mouth can be chalky or full of cotton, and affected people may have trouble speaking, tasting food, or swallowing. People with Sj00f6gren syndrome are at a higher risk of tooth decay and infections in the mouth because saliva protects the teeth and the tissues of the oral cavity. Sju00f6gren syndrome, dry eyes, and dry mouth are the primary symptoms of the condition, but general health and life expectancy are largely unaffected. Disorders involving connective tissue inflammation are also known as rheumatic disorders. A small number of people with Sj-u00f6gren syndrome develop lymphoma, a blood-related cancer that results in tumor formation in the lymph nodes but can spread to other organs. Many people who are first diagnosed with another rheumatic disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, are also affected by Sj's dry eye and dry mouth. After the onset of Sju00f6gren syndrome, other autoimmune disorders can also develop. Around half of all people with Sju00f6gren syndrome have another autoimmune disorder.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/sjogren-syndrome


Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

Individuals with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have microthrombocytopenia, which is a decrease in the number and number of blood cells involved in clotting clotting. Microthrombocytopenia can also lead to tiny areas of bleeding under the skin's surface, resulting in purpura-like purpura, or sporiae-sized rashes made up of tiny red dots called petechiae. In addition, abnormal or nonfunctional immune system cells known as white blood cells are also associated with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. People with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have an elevated risk of many immune and inflammatory disorders as a result of changes in white blood cells. In people with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, the risk of contracting such diseases as cancer of the immune system cells is also elevated. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is often thought to be a member of a disease spectrum with two other conditions: X-linked thrombocytopenia and severe congenital neutropenia.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/wiskott-aldrich-syndrome

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions