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Protein - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 24 July 2022

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Lysinuric protein intolerance

The body's inability to digest and use particular protein building blocks, namely lysine, arginine, and ornithine, is a disorder that can be attributed to the body's inability to digest and use such protein building blocks, such as lysine, arginine, and ornithine. People with lysinuric protein intolerance have characteristics such as an enlarged liver and spleen, short stature, impaired immune function, and progressively brittle bones that are susceptible to fracture. In addition, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a lung disorder, can also develop. Since infants are weaned and receive larger amounts of protein from solid foods, signs and symptoms of lysinuric protein intolerance persist.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/lysinuric-protein-intolerance


Mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration

Mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration is a common metabolic disorder in the nervous system. As the disease progresses, affected individuals often experience other mobility difficulties, such as muscle cramping and involuntary muscle cramping. Many people with MPAN have a pattern of movement abnormalities identified as parkinsonism. Degeneration of the nerve cells that carry visual information from the eyes to the brain; difficulties with swallowing; and, in later stages of the condition, an inability to regulate the bowels or urine flow are among the problems that arise in people with MPAN.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mitochondrial-membrane-protein-associated-neurodegeneration


Protein C deficiency

Individuals with a mild protein C deficiency are at risk of a form of blood clot called a deep vein thrombosis. Although most people with mild protein C deficiency do not have abnormal blood clots never develop abnormal blood clots, certain conditions can raise the risk of their development. The risk of abnormal blood clotting can also be influenced by another genetic disorder of blood clotting in addition to protein C deficiency. Infants in severe cases of protein C deficiency, infants develop the purpura fulminans, a life-threatening blood clotting disorder that appears shortly after birth. The formation of blood clots in the tiny blood vessels around the body is characteristic of Purpura fulminans. These blood clots block normal blood circulation and can cause localized body tissue death. All available blood clotting proteins are used in widespread blood clotting procedures. Individuals who survive the newborn period may suffer from recurrent episodes of purpura fulminans.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/protein-c-deficiency


Protein S deficiency

Protein S deficiency is a form of blood clotting. Individuals with weak protein S deficiency are at risk of a clot called a deep vein thrombosis that occurs in the deep veins of the arms or legs. People with mild protein S deficiency may have an elevated risk of abnormal blood clots. Other causes may also increase the risk of abnormal blood clots in people with mild protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and other inherited disorders of blood clotting can also influence risk. However, some people with mild protein S deficiency do not have an abnormal blood clot. Infants in severe cases of protein S deficiency infants develop purpura fulminans, a life-threatening blood clotting disorder that occurs shortly after birth. The formation of blood clots inside small blood vessels throughout the body is characteristic of Purpura fulminans. These blood clots interfere with normal blood circulation and may lead to body tissue death. All available blood clotting proteins are used in widespread blood clotting procedures.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/protein-s-deficiency


Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency

Signs and symptoms of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency may appear in childhood or later in life. Signs and symptoms of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency that may begin in childhood include hypotonia, muscle pain, a loss of muscle tissue, and a loss of sensation in the extremities. Problems related to mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency can be triggered by fasting or viral infections. Reye syndrome is most common in those viral infections due to the use of aspirin.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mitochondrial-trifunctional-protein-deficiency


D-bifunctional protein deficiency

D-bifunctional protein deficiency syndrome is a disorder that causes the deficiency of nervous system functions in infants. D-bifunctional protein deficiency newborns have poor muscle tone and seizures. Deficiency children with D-bifunctional protein deficiency do not live past the age of 2. A small number of people with this disorder are marginally affected. Individuals with D-bifunctional protein deficiency may have a prominent forehead, widely spaced eyes, a longer nose, a longer nose, and a prominent roof of the mouth, as well as a prominent arch of the hard palate at the roof of the mouth. Affected infants may also have an abnormally wide space between the skull bones. D-bifunctional protein deficiency is often described as pseudo-Zellweger syndrome because these symptoms are similar to those of another disorder called Zellweger syndrome.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/d-bifunctional-protein-deficiency


Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration

People impacted by the outbreak of iron buildup in the brain that can be seen with medical imaging. For this reason, BPAN is categorized as a neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation disorder, although iron accumulation does not occur until late in the disease. Recurrent seizures have arisen in infant or early childhood for many people with BPAN. Affected individuals can also experience generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Short lapses in consciousness may cause staring spells or daydreaming, sudden episodes of weak muscle tone, involuntary muscle twitches, or more specific movements such as epileptic spasms are all examples that may occur in this disorder. Children with BPAN also have intellectual disabilities, delayed growth, including significant difficulties with vocabulary and producing speech, and a difficult time organizing movements. Ataxia can affect the ability to walk and fine motor skills such as using utensils. Affected individuals can have behavioral changes that are often similar to those of a disorder called Rett syndrome. Individuals with BPAN in late adolescence or early adulthood may experience a gradual decline in intellectual development that can lead to a severe loss of reasoning and reasoning skills. Dystonia is a condition characterized by voluntary muscle contractions that is not related to muscle contractions. The life of people with BPAN varies. Aspiration pneumonia is a form of a bacterial lung disease related to dementia or mobility impairments, such as falls or swallowing difficulties that can lead to a bacterial lung disease called aspiration pneumonia.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/beta-propeller-protein-associated-neurodegeneration

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions