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Prostate Cancer - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 24 April 2022

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UK Genetic Prostate Cancer Study: Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Studies

The University of The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Sutton, has broken the report into two parts: The investigation is divided into two parts: The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Sutton; The study will be available to every patient attending the prostate clinics at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Sutton. Several of The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust PrCa tumor samples also have consent under a condition in the operation consent form in use at the time that the 'information removed can be used for research purposes. ' Those patients who are still living and have previously participated in the research from 1992 to present, as well as those who have not completed the questionnaire process, will be invited to participate in this portion of the study. This is the same as the Study at The Royal Marsden, except that the research is presented verbally and then if the patient is curious, their information is given to the study office by confidential fax, and the university gives the patient an information sheet and consent form. One of the two groups is currently the UKGPCS, but it is also available in fourth-degree related pairs where one is a young age or PrCa in first-degree related pairs, where one is a total of three or more relatives with PrCa at any age. This will be carried out by the Medical Research Information Service, using data held by the NHS Information Centre and the NHS Central Register. As part of the medical care and clinical follow-up study on prostate cancer patients, medical and clinical follow-up data is also collected on a regular basis, including disease characteristics and treatment outcomes. To try to identify genetic markers of disease genes, we'll use the genetic results with these clinical studies.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01737242


Active Surveillance in Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

You have an early stage of prostate cancer that can be treated with surgery or radiation in a timely manner. Low-stage low-volume prostate cancer is an investigational approach to combat low-volume small volume prostate cancer. While on active surveillance, you will have no cure for the prostate cancer. However, you will continue to perform Prostate Specific Antigen examinations, physical examination, and other procedures to determine when the cancer is becoming a greater risk, which may require you to start treatment. If you sign up to this research, you will not have standard prostate cancer treatment. At the start of the trial and every six months to monitor your cancer, blood will be drawn for PSA tests. At the beginning of the investigation, the prostate will be biopsyled. At your first repeat biopsy at Year 1, additional prostate biopsies will be performed as a doctor believes it is necessary. Every 6 months to see if your doctor can detect any prostate nodules, your doctor will have digital rectal examination every 6 months to see if your doctor can detect any prostate nodules. Every 12 months to see if your doctor can find any abnormalities in the prostate, you will have transrectal ultrasonography. If an exam or test findings reveal that your disease is getting worse, you will be able to have surgery to remove the cancer. While you're on research, if an exam or test findings show that your disease is getting worse, you will have the opportunity to have surgery to remove the cancer. A 12-month follow-up: Every 12 months, the researchers will review your medical files, or you will be called or emailed and asked how you are doing.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00490763


68Ga-PSMA-11 PET in Patients With Prostate Cancer

Patients will be given a single dose of 68Ga-PSMA-11 and a PET/CT or PET/MRI imaging study. PET/MRI can be used as a PET/CT or an MRI scan as PET/MRI. Using a modern digital GE PET/CT scanner or a modern digital PET/MRI scanner, the 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT can be purchased. Men with pathologically established prostate cancer, high risk of cancer at diagnosis, evidence of biochemical recurrence, or a common metastatic disease are all expected to begin and change systemic therapy regimens. Patients will be injected with 100 MBq-300 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA-11 through this catheter.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05197257


Collection of Blood From Patients With Prostate Cancer

All patients seen in the NCI prostate cancer clinic are eligible, according to Eligibility: - All patients seen in the NCI prostate cancer clinic are eligible. In the GMB Clinic, NCI, patients with a previous diagnosis of prostate cancer will be analyzed. After the patient signs the protocol consent form, blood samples will be collected. Both white blood cells and Genomic DNA will be extracted from these samples and used for genotyping and assembly of individual cell lines. The genetic variation will be correlated with prostate cancer prognosis and prognostic indicators.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00923221


18F-DCFPyL PET/CT in High Risk and Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Background The second most common cause of cancer death in American men is prostate cancer. The possibility of PET, a first-generation PET agent targeting PSMA, in patients with advanced local disease and biochemically recurrent prostate cancer, was shown by increased blood pool activity, but it was hindered by excessive blood pool activity. This antibody-binding to PSMA is high in affinity, but F-DCFPyL, a second generation PSMA PET agent, clears quickly from the blood pool, providing a new method for diagnosing high risk cancers and determining recurrent disease. Primary Objective - To determine the ability of F-DCFPyL to accurately diagnose high-risk primary prostate cancer and detect areas of recurrent prostate cancer. An additional 18F-DCFPyL PET/CT scan within 1 month of the first study will be performed within 1 month of unilateral salivary gland cannulation and an infusion of unlabeled DCFPyL into the cannulated gland. Patients from cohort 2 who have a positive 18F-DCFPyL PET/CT scan at any time may also have a one-time 18F-FDG PET/CT within 30 days of the positive 18F-DCFPyL PET/CT.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03181867


Care of the Prostate Cancer Patient and Prospective Procurement of Prostate Cancer Tissue

About 1 in every six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Urologic Oncology Branch investigators have been investigating the genetic causes of urologic cancers since 1982. The identification of the genes for kidney cancer has resulted in the approval of a number of new drugs for patients with advanced disease by the FDA. In the same vein, we intend to investigate prostate cancer's genetics in order to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Object: Collect blood, urine, saliva, prostatic signals, and benign and malignant tissue from patients with known or suspected prostate cancer will be used to investigate the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer progression and, eventually, identifying novel therapeutic targets. Tissue engineering technique in which normal and malignant prostate cancer tissues can be obtained at the time of clinically indicated diagnostic and/or therapeutic intervention.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02594202


Natural History Study of Men at High Genetic Risk for Prostate Cancer

Background: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. Prostate cancer has a large inherited predisposition and certain genetic variants that are attributed to an elevated risk of prostate cancer. An emerging trend in prostate cancer screening is to identify populations at risk of developing prostate cancer based on their genetic predisposition. Objective: To track the natural history of men with identified germline mutations or likely pathogenic variants of genes that put them at risk for prostate cancer. DNA mismatch repair genes associated with Lynch syndrome, HOXB13, ATM, NBN, TP53, CHEK2, PALB2, RAD51D, BRIP1, or FANC are all associated with Lynch syndrome.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03805919


Biomarkers of Sulforaphane/Broccoli Sprout Extract in Prostate Cancer

Following randomization, participants will begin with four study tablets in the morning for breakfast and four tablets in the evening for dinner. SFN will be distributed in the form of eight BroccoMax® tablets in the morning. Examine Day 28 – 3 days Physical examination including height and weight measurements will be performed in SST-tiger tubes for determination of SFN and its metabolite levels and biomarker analyses. In liquid nitrogen, a portion of the prostate tumor following surgical resection will be fresh frozen. After pathological evaluation is complete, tumor blocks or slides will be requested by the clinical research coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh's Health Sciences Tissue Bank for biomarker analyses. Post-Treatment Follow-Up All participants in the study will have a regular follow-up whether determined by their treating urologist and/or medical oncologist.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03665922


International Registry for Men With Advanced Prostate Cancer (IRONMAN)

We want to establish the International Registry to Optimize Outcomes in Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer as a prospective, international cohort of minimum 5,000 men with advanced cancer, including men with mHSPC and M1/M1 CRPC. This cohort study will aid in a better understanding of advanced prostate cancer care and treatment across countries, academia, and community-based practices. This registry will help identify the treatment sequences or combinations that maximize overall survival and PROMs for men with mHSPC and M1-M1 CRPC as a result. As such, it will help identify the treatment sequences or combinations that optimize overall survival and PROMs for men with mHSPC and M0/M1 CRPC. Existing tumor tissue can be used to compare described blood based studies when feasible. This cohort research will provide the academic community with a unique biorepository to find biomarkers of treatment response and resistance.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03151629


Phase II Trial of Radium-223 in Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Background: Androgen deprivation therapy and surveillance are two treatment options for prostate cancer patients with biochemical change after localized therapy without either definitive radiation or surgery. Radium-223 has shown the ability to promote survival in men with symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with a manageable toxicity profile, particularly in patients that have not received docetaxel. Radium-223 may be a safe alternative for patients with BRPC that is not associated with significant disability, but it may have a long-term effect due to its potential impact on the immune system and/or the bone microenvironment. Emerging PET imaging studies will most likely find evidence of micrometastatic disease, often in the bones, among biochemically recurrent prostate cancer patients, although these patients will not have a common health care model that can be backed by prospective results. Radium-223 has shown the ability to aid men with symptomatic prostate cancer by increasing survival in men with osteogenic prostate cancer, but it's unclear what the effect is on patients with micrometastatic or PET positive prostate cancer in their bones is. Preclinical results have shown that radium-223 can influence the immune system. Objective: To determine clinically significant changes in immune cell populations in participants with biochemically active or 18F NaF PET scan positive prostate cancer treated with radium-223 is a complex process. Bolton, Minnesota: Positive prostate cancer treated with radium-223 Eligibility: Objective: To determine statistically significant changes in immune cell counts in comparison to baseline in participants with biochemically recurrent or 18F NaF PET scan positive prostate cancer treated with radium-223 Eligibility: Bone radium-223 Eligibility, a alterations in alterations in compared to reactive or 18F NaF Tc e a Tc in patients with Tc-293 Tc ado a e Scan e -393 Tc adenotologically diagnosed otologically diagnosed adeno adotologically og NaF PET scan positive prostate cancer treated with scan and Tc adenotologically adeno hetologically chemo.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04206319

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions