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Postpartum Depression - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 26 April 2022

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The Relationship Between Neonatal Surgery, Postpartum Depression, and Infant Clinical Course

Objective Postpartum depression affects 10–15% of women in the general population, and studies indicate an increased risk among infants with severe health problems. This report investigates the prevalence of PPD in mothers of surgical patients in the neonatal intensive care unit's neonatal intensive care unit, as well as the patient's clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. This group was previously reported as such as infants with congenital heart disease, however infants with congenital heart disease were eligible except for infants with congenital heart disease. According to a statistical review, there was no significant connection between neonatal surgery and elevated EPDS. Conclusions Mothers of surgical patients are not significantly more likely to be screen positive for post-partum depression than those of other NICU mothers. Both surgical and non-surgical NICU patients' parents are at risk, and routine testing for PPD in mothers of both surgical and non-surgical NICU patients is highly recommended.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-021-03353-7


A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial for Reducing Postpartum Depression in Low-Income Minority Women at Community-Based Women’s Health Clinics

Objective In southern Israel, an intervention that gave tailored clinic staff education on postpartum depression, as well as education and social assistance aimed at lowering PPD among low-income Bedouin women. Methods We conducted a non-randomized controlled trial at two women's health clinics. EPDS change was estimated by the EPDS change, and EPDS changes were compared in a control clinic vs. an intervention clinic. Results The intervention group saw a larger decrease in dichotomous EPDS 10 between times 1 and 2 than the control group at times 1 and 2 than the control group. Both groups' intervention and control were shown that high PPD awareness significantly contributed to positive EPDS change in the intervention group, as well as strong social protection against negative EPDS change in both groups, including intervention and control. Following staff education, an intervention focusing on improving PPD knowledge and social assistance was attributed to reduced EPDS and positive EPDS improvement following the intervention.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-022-03434-1


Family history of psychiatric disorders as a risk factor for maternal postpartum depression: a systematic review protocol

Background Postpartum depression is the most common postpartum psychiatric disorder, affecting 11–15% of new mothers, and early detection and treatment are critical due to adverse outcomes. A risk factor for developing psychiatric episodes outside of the postpartum period is family history of psychiatric disorders, but there is no evidence connecting familial risk and PPD. Hence, the primary aim of this systematic review is to summarize the current literature on the correlation between family history of psychiatric disorders and PPD. According to a risk analysis of the relationship between family history of psychiatric disorders and PPD, eligible studies are case-control and cohort studies establishing a risk estimate. To aid early detection of women at high risk of PPD in routine perinatal care, an evaluation of psychiatric family history as a PPD risk factor is vital.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-022-01952-1


Postpartum Depression, Complications During Pregnancy, and Offspring Behavior Problems in Early Childhood

Background Complications During pregnancy, postpartum, and current maternal depression are risk factors that can influence child development in early and middle childhood. Wave 1 included a representative sample of 720 Israeli Jewish women and their children aged 2–6. Wave 2 was held three years later and included 409 Israeli Jewish women and their 5–9-year-old children. In Wave 2, postpartum depression was not related to children's behavioral difficulties. In Wave 2's present maternal depressive symptoms, they were moderately related to children's behavioral difficulties.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10566-021-09630-4


Transcriptome-wide association study for postpartum depression implicates altered B-cell activation and insulin resistance

Postpartum depression affects 1 out of 7 women and has detrimental mental health consequences for both mother and child. Hence, we conducted the largest transcriptome-wide association study for PPD to date using RNA-sequencing in whole blood and deconvoluted cell types. B-cells in the majority of transcriptome-wide significant results with pathway analyses indicating altered B-cell activation and insulin resistance. deQTLs were enriched for several brain region-specific eQTLs, but no match was found for MDD risk loci.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-022-01525-7


Postpartum depression in maternal thyroidal changes

Evidence in the literature has shown that there may be a correlation between thyroid antibodies and depression during pregnancy and postpartum. This research aims to conduct a systematic review of the prevalence of postpartum depression in women with thyroid abnormalities during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. PPD prevalence in pregnant women with thyroid problems varied between 8. 3% and 36. 0%, according to estimates.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13044-022-00124-6

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions