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Postpartum Depression - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 26 April 2022

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A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial for Reducing Postpartum Depression in Low-Income Minority Women at Community-Based Women's Health Clinics.

In southern Israel, an intervention that included targeted clinic staff education on postpartum depression and awareness raising and social care aimed at lowering PPD among low-income Bedouin women. Changes in EPDS level in a control clinic vs. an intervention clinic were estimated, and we compared EPDS changes in a control clinic vs. an intervention clinic. Results The intervention group had a larger decrease in dichotomous EPDS at times 1 and 2 than the control group, but not the control group. Both groups, intervention and control, showed that high PPD knowledge contributed to positive EPDS change in the intervention group, as well as strong social protection against negative EPDS growth in both groups, as well as high socioeconomic stability. Following staff training, an intervention focusing on improving PPD knowledge and social assistance was associated with decreased EPDS and positive EPDS change as a result of the intervention.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35445883


Association between breastfeeding and postpartum depression: A meta-analysis.

It's likely that breastfeeding is responsible for postpartum depression. BF was cited with a 14% reduced risk of PPD, which was at an 18 percent lower risk of PPD. A 37% reduced risk was associated with a single BF episode, BF duration of > 1 month was attributed to a 37% reduced risk, and BF for 1 month was associated with a 6% lower risk. Exclusive breastfeeding was associated with a 53% lower risk of PPD compared to never breastfeeding, compared to never breastfeeding. And EBF, when compared to partial breastfeeding, was attributed to an 8 percent lower risk of PPD. Our results indicate an association between PPD and BF risk.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35460745


Machine learning in the prediction of postpartum depression: A review.

Current screening techniques in the setting of postpartum depression are firmly grounded in self-report symptom-based techniques. In an attempt to reduce morbidity, mortality, and the economic burden, the introduction of the latest machine learning techniques may help to refine patient screening by precisely identifying potential PPD predictors and, eventually, a population at risk of developing the disease. We did a bibliographic search on PubMed and Embase looking for studies aimed at finding PPD predictors using ML techniques. The support vector machine was the most common algorithm. PPD prediction by ML algorithms is still scarce, with most studies employing various variables selection and ML algorithms, eventually reducing the generalizability of the results. With current technology and clinical experience, it may be possible to identify a population at risk of contracting PPD.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35460742


Machine learning prediction models for postpartum depression: A multicenter study in Japan.

Depression and perinatal mental health care are of increasing importance around the world. Methods A multicenter retrospective review was conducted in Japan using the clinical records of 10 013 women who delivered at 35 weeks of gestation at 12 maternity care hospitals in Japan. AUROCs were similar to those in conventional logistic regression models, according to the results In the machine learning models created using clinical data before discharge. PPD's predictive performance was significantly enhanced by the incorporation of additional 2-week postpartum checkup data into the model, relative to those without in the Ridge regression and Elastic net. Conclusions Our machine learning models did not have higher predictive success for PPD than traditional logistic regression models.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35438215


Associations among Caesarean Section Birth, Post-Traumatic Stress, and Postpartum Depression Symptoms.

We wanted to establish whether there was a correlation between C-section type and PPD symptoms, and if postnatal PTSD symptoms mediate this association. In adjusted and non-adjusted models, the direct effect of emergency C-section on PPD was non-significant; however, the indirect effect of emergency C-section on PPD symptoms as a mediator was significant after accounting for prenatal depression, social assistance, and SES. This means that mothers who experienced an emergency or unplanned C-section had a higher PTSD score by almost half a point relative to mothers who underwent a planned C-section, even after adjustment. Overall, emergency C-section was only related to PPD-related illnesses, primarily due to PTSD symptoms. According to the findings, PTSD symptoms may be a factor by which emergency C-sections are connected to PPD symptoms.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35457767


Family history of psychiatric disorders as a risk factor for maternal postpartum depression: a systematic review protocol.

A risk factor for onset of psychosis disorders outside of the postpartum period is family history of psychiatric disorders, but no evidence of a link between familial risk and PPD is available. Hence, this systematic review seeks to summarize the available evidence on the relationship between family history of psychiatric disorders and PPD. A risk estimation for the relationship between family history of psychiatric disorders and PPD is included in eligible studies, as well as cohort and case-control studies. PPD and family history were the first to synthesize current research and produce a total estimate for the relationship between family history of psychiatric disorders and PPD. To assist early detection of women at high risk of PPD in routine perinatal care, early evaluation of psychiatric family history as a PPD risk factor is crucial.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35422027


Association of COVID-19 and Endemic Systemic Racism With Postpartum Anxiety and Depression Among Black Birthing Individuals.

Importance The association of endemic structural racism and the global health crisis secondary to the COVID-19 pandemic represent a syndemic, defined as the accumulation of 2 or more endemic and epidemic conditions that can have adverse repercussions on health. Black people have been placed in a special danger for poor postpartum mental health outcomes, according to long-running injustices. Experiences of racial bigotry and general systemic bigotry can influence the relationship between elevated negative COVID-19 pandemic experiences and postpartum depression. Negative COVID-19 pandemic experiences were associated with elevated risk of depression screening positive for depression only at higher levels of systemic or interpersonal violence, but not at lower levels of systemic or interpersonal discrimination. In the same way, negative COVID-19 experiences were associated with anxiety only at higher levels of interpersonal mistrust, but not at lower levels of interpersonal mistrust.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35416928


Predictive validity of the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale and other tools for screening depression in pregnant and postpartum women: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Objectives: Through a systematic review and meta-analysis, the aim of this paper is to determine the predictive value of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and other screening techniques for pregnant and postpartum women. The risk of bias in diagnostic studies was investigated by the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. In 1831 pregnant women from nine research, the EPDS' sensitivity and specificity were 0. 81 and 0. 87, respectively, with a summary receiver operating characteristic curve of 0. 90. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9's sROC curve was 0. 74 percent, which was lower than that of the EPDS. The Beck Depression Inventory and the ten-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale were 0. 91, similar to that of the EPDS. The EPDS can be used in preference to other screening methods to screen for depression in perinatal women at a primary care setting or a midwifery center, according to the authors.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35416478


Additional evidence on prevalence and predictors of postpartum depression in China: A study of 300,000 puerperal women covered by a community-based routine screening programme.

Background The majority of studies on the prevalence and predictors of postpartum depression in China were mainly hospital-based with very few study samples. Methods of study In Shenzhen between 2015 August and 2017, a cross-sectional research was conducted with all the women who were admitted to a hospital and were tested for depression during regular postpartum home visits. With a cut-off score of 10, The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used as the screening device. Results Approximately 300,000 puerperal women were included in the study, which had a PPD prevalence of 4. 3 percent. Both prenatal anxiety and depression were related to PPD risk at 4. 55 and 3. 80 times, respectively. Conclusions PPD is significantly lower among community-level PPD cases than hospitalized rates. The most important predictors of PPD are prenatal anxiety and depression. Universal coverage is made possible by incorporating depression screening into regular postpartum home visits.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35405436


Trajectories of depression symptoms from pregnancy through 24 months postpartum among Kenyan women living with HIV.

Background We investigated longitudinal trends and cofactors of depressive symptoms among pregnant and postpartum women with HIV. At 6 timepoints, WLWH were serially assessed for depressive symptoms from pregnancy to 24 months postpartum. Using group-based trajectory modeling, depression was diagnosed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and longitudinal charts. Among 824 enrolled women, 14. 6% ever had MSD during pregnancy or postpartum; 8. 6% of WLWH had MSD in pregnancy and 9. 0% had postpartum MSD. Increased MSD risk were associated with unintended pregnancy and recent HIV diagnosis, according to the researchers, while less likely was found with HIV status disclosure to partner and social care. Four phenotypes of peripartum depressive symptoms were identified in the study: persistent no/low signs, mild signs of postpartum, and modestly elevated intracerebility symptoms throughout the entire course.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35394987

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions