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Phosphorus - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 15 September 2022

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The ratio of β-1,4-glucosidase activity to phosphomonoesterase activity remains low in phosphorus-fertilized tropical soils: A meta-analysis

The BG:PME ratio in tropical soils was lower than those in other soils, showing increased microbial P demand in P-poor tropical soils compared to those in other regions. However, P fertilization raised the available P content of tropical soils at a much higher rate than average, even under continuous, long-term fertilization. P deficiencies in tropical soils may have been overestimated by this result, as an indicator of microbial P demand. On the other hand, it is also possible that soil available P content, which is often used as a determinant of soil P richness, does not necessarily indicate available P for soil microorganisms. Validating the BG:PME ratio as a measure of microbial P demand in tropical ecosystems could help us get a better picture of microbial P shortages.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607900420


Relationship between phosphorus uptake via indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and crop response: A 32P-labeling study

Either the direct root pathway or the mycorrhizal pathway was instrumental in triggering shoot P uptake. P and growth responses were closely linked to a rise in MP involvement and shoot PUE in maize, but only P responses were significantly similar to the latter in wheat, and only P responses were highly similar to the former. These results show that crops can obtain significant amounts of P through the MP with indigenous AM fungi, particularly at low P values, and highlight the importance of plant and AM fungal identification in regulating the relationship between hidden P uptake and symbiotic outcomes. Hence, fertilizer P application rates can be adjusted to optimize the availability and assemblage of the indigenous AM fungi and crop PUE to improve MP growth and symbiotic outcomes, which may also aid in the effective use of AM fungi in intensive cropping systems.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607862029


Nutritional composition of maize grain associated with phosphorus and zinc fertilization

The nutritional quality of maize grain, which is a common staple food, can directly impact human health. Under three phosphorus and two zinc application rates, protein, amino acid, fatty acid, starch, antioxidant, trace elements, and maize grain antinutrient profiles and concentrations were tested. P-application based P significantly reduced Zn, Fe, and tocopherol concentrations compared to no P application.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607838068


Phosphorus containing analogues of SAHA as inhibitors of HDACs.

Histone deacetylases are a family of enzymes that regulate DNA transcription by altering its binding to histone proteins. Vorinostat, or suberanilohydroxamic acid, is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with a hydroxamic acid that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma. We investigated phosphate, phosphoramidate, and phosphorothiolate samples as isosteres of the canonical hydroxamic acid motif of traditional HDAC inhibitors, specifically. These phosphorus-based SAHA analogs displayed slowed binding to HDACs, but with greater potency than phosphonate SAHA analogs that were previously tested.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35514164


Variation of forage quality traits in Tunisian populations of Brachypodium hybridum in response to phosphorus deficiency

79 lines from Tunisian Brachypodium hybridum populations were raised in two different phosphatrus availability levels, and genetic variation was explored by using forage quality traits to determine the mechanisms that explain their genetic variation. All traits demonstrated high heritability, and the response to most traits of P deficiency was influenced by the population effect, which explained 52. 3 percent of the variation, indicating strong population variation. Although significant for most traits, only 18. 13% of variation was due to P treatment, indicating no plastic reaction to P deficiency. Overall, our findings showed that the effect of local adaptation overrides the effects of phenotypic plasticity related to the variation of forage quality traits, revealing a wide range of adaptive genetic variations among B. hybridum populations in reaction to P deficiency.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607867577


Effect of phosphorus concentration on mineral nutrition and growth phenology in Pistacia vera L. and Pistacia atlantica Desf.

Pistacia vera L. and Pistacia atlantica Desf. This research was conducted to determine the effect of phosphorus on two pistachio species Pistacia vera L. and Pistacia atlantica Desf. Phosphorous acid is a form of phosphorus 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, and 120 mg/L as phosphoric acid. P. vera and P. atlantica's findings showed that P has a significant effect on minerals uptake, leaf area, and relative growth rates. P. atlantica leaf area and relative growth rate soared sharply P. atlantica leaf area and relative growth rate compared to low phosphorus level and high P level 60 and 120 ppm. According to this report, P. atlantica establishments at 5 mg/L enhance P. atlantica establishments. Also, P. atlantica's growth remained steady at 15,30 mg/L. This finding, which has significant ramifications in arid land restoration, where many soils have high P values and drought from aridity, adds to P. atlantica's adaptation to water and salinity stress.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607826132


Artificial humic acid improves maize growth and soil phosphorus utilization efficiency

Humic substances, which are macromolecular polymers, are potential soil amendments that can improve soil phosphorus utilization and reduce phosphorus loss. However, the effect of chemical humic substances on maize agronomic properties and soil phosphorus transformation in black soil areas has yet to be investigated, and the mechanisms by which it influences seedling phosphorus utilization remain unclear. For comparisons, A-HS' artificial humic acid and fulvic acid is mixed with commercial humic acid. In rhizosphere and bulk soil, the study found a declining alpha number of phoC microbial communities. A-HS has influenced the structure of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil microbial communities, as well as increased soil phosphorus phosphate and nutrient uptake by maize. This report, as a general result, shows that using artificial humic acid in organic farming practices will not only increase phosphorus availability in farmland but also promote the growth of a healthy soil microbiome.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607818834


Increase of soil phosphorus bioavailability with ectomycorrhizal tree dominance in subtropical secondary forests

To increase vitamin intake, many tree species of forest tree species form symbiotic relationships with either arbuscular mycorrhizal or ectomycorrhizal fungi. However, no information is known about the degree to which mycorrhiza mediate the effects of tree species on soil P bioavailability outside of the temperate zone. Here, we established a natural gradient with increasing ECM tree dominance in subtropical secondary forests, and investigated the relationship between the ECM tree dominance and soil bioavailable P content. We analyzed the contents of four soil bioavailable P pools using the newly developed biologically-based P extraction method, acid phosphatase activity, litter biomass and quality, microbial biomass carbon, and soil abiotic variables, among other soil bioavailable P pools. ECM-dominated soils in particular had markedly higher citric-P and HCl-P than AM soils, indicating that ECM forests can efficiently obtain inorganic P by releasing organic acids and proton excretion.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607837985


Phosphorus speciation in the organic layer of two Swedish forest soils 13–24 years after wood ash and nitrogen application

Wood ash applied to forests can help restore phosphorus and other essential minerals that are missing following whole tree harvesting. Previous studies into the extent to which ash application leads to increased P solubility in the soil is inconsistent. P in aboveground tree biomass was also determined at the previous location. Overall, the ash application increased P in the organic layer by between 6 and 28 kg P hau00b9, or 17% of the initial P content in the applied ash's applied ash's 17. In the ash treatment and the surveillance, there were 4. 6 kg Hau00b9 in the ash treatment and a 0. 4 kilogram hau00b9 in the ash therapy, and a 1. 6 kg hau00b9 in the ash treatment, as well as a 1. 6 kg hau00e5lund. There was a strong correlation between the concentrations of Olsen-P and Al-bound P and Fe-bound P as well as Fe-bound P, suggesting that the ash application resulted in an increase in relatively soluble P associated with hydroxy-Al and hydroxy-Fe compounds, as well as Fe-bound P. In addition, there was an 18% rise in P uptake by trees in the ash treatment, which was also an 18% rise. With a 39 percent increase in plant P uptake in the N treatment, there was an increase in plant P uptake in response to improved N availability, which resulted in increased P uptake in response to higher N availability. Hence, the use of wood ash raised Al-bound P, easily available P, and P uptake. While also increasing tree P uptake, N fertilization's growth spurt, rather than decreasing readily available P and did not result in a change in soil P speciation.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607837982

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions