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Parkinson's Disease - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 27 April 2022

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Living with Parkinson's disease: disease and medication experiences of patients and caregivers.

Prior studies seldom focused on medications' experiences, but more focuses on prescriptions than symptoms and drug use in patients with Parkinson's disease. This report explored extensive living and medication experiences among patients with PD and their caregivers. After a PD diagnosis, life affected by medications, experiences of caregivers caring for PD patients, and patient communication, physicians and patients were based on five themes that were derived: symptoms and help-seeking behaviours before a diagnosis, emotional consequences, and life change after a PD diagnosis, life and disability. Patients regularly modified their daily routines to deal with PD and medication side effects, as shown by the following links.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34978276


Role of exosomes in the pathogenesis of inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

Exosomes play multiple roles in PD-related inflammation and lead to inflammation-associated with myelin development in normal neurons and the extracellular environment, which leads to exosomes transporting toxic -synuclein oligomers to immature neurons and into the extracellular environment, triggering oligomerization of -synuclein in normal neurons. The creation and release of mitochondrial vesicles and exosomes establishes a new way to link mitochondrial dysfunction to systemic inflammation associated with PD. Given the importance of exosomes as mediators of neuron-glia communication in neuroinflammation and neuropathogenesis, new targeted therapeutic approaches are now being developed that use these types of extracellular vesicles as drug carriers.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35142665


Parkinson's disease and diabetes mellitus: common mechanisms and treatment repurposing.

Diabetes in the brain has been linked to neurodegeneration and abnormal insulin signaling in the central nervous system for the last decade, as insulin in the brain has been implicated in neuronal development, plasticity, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. Diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance not only increase the likelihood of getting Parkinson's disease, but they can also determine the prognosis and progression of Parkinson's disease.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35017411


Is activation of GDNF/RET signaling the answer for successful treatment of Parkinson's disease? A discussion of data from the culture dish to the clinic.

The tyrosine kinase RET receptor, a canonical receptor, is linked to dopaminergic neuron survival and physiology in cell culture experiments and animal models, and the GDNF family receptor alpha 1 is crucial for cell culture experiments and animal models. In the substantia n. . . . of the midbrain, the idea of trying GDNF/RET signaling as a therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease with the characteristics of dopaminergic cell death. Despite several clinical trials with GDNF in Parkinson's disease patients, which mainly focused on improving the GDNF delivery method, only in a handful patients.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34916419


Schwann cells differentiated from skin-derived precursors provide neuroprotection via autophagy inhibition in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease.

We hypothesized that skin-derived precursor cells have neuroprotective activity in Parkinson's disease by stimulating autophagy. 6-hydroxydopamine-damaged SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with a culture medium containing skin-derived precursors that were differentiated into Schwann cells in this research. The SKP-SC culture medium remarkably increased the expression of SH-SY5Y cells damaged by 6-hydroxydopamine, reduced excessive autophagy, reduced serum tyrosine hydroxylase expression, reduced autophagy, decreased autophagy, decreased autophagy, reduced autophagy, reduced autophagosome production, and stimulated the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, according to the results.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34782582


Safety and efficacy of subcutaneous night-time only apomorphine infusion to treat insomnia in patients with Parkinson's disease (APOMORPHEE): a multicentre, randomised, controlled, double-blind crossover study.

Patients with Parkinson's disease-related insomnia will be of great help to patients with Parkinson's disease-related insomnia. We wanted to determine the safety and effectiveness of subcutaneous night-time only apomorphine infusion in patients with Parkinson's disease and insomnia. Methods We conducted a randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in 11 French expert centers on Parkinson's disease and sleep centers. From the beginning to the end of each treatment period, the key efficacy endpoint was the change in Parkinson's disease sleep scale scores. First, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive apomorphine first and 21 patients were randomly selected to receive placebo first, with apomorphine first and 21 patients being treated first. With nighttime apomorphine infusion, the change in PDSS score was much higher than placebo. During the apomorphine period, 25 participants were identified in 25 participants and 17 participants were during the placebo period. Apomorphine was associated with more frequent dizziness than placebo, according to Apomorphine.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35429481


Angiotensin-(1-7) reduces α-synuclein aggregation by enhancing autophagic activity in Parkinson's disease.

To develop a Parkinson's disease model, we used intraperitoneal injection of rotenone to male Sprague-Dawley rats for four weeks in this research. We investigated whether angiotensin- is neuroprotective in this case by continuing administration of angiotensin-- into the correct substantia n. . . . for four weeks. In the substantia n. . . . , we discovered that angiotensin-infusion improved parkinsonian behavior and reduced aggregation of synucleins. Primary dopaminergic neurons were extracted from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats substantia n. . . . . . and treated with rotenone, angiotensin-, and/or the Mas receptor blocker A-779 for 24 hours. In rotenone-treated cells, angiotensin-attenuated apoptosis and -synuclein aggregation were discovered after binding to the Mas receptor, angiotensin-attenuated apoptosis and -synuclein aggregation. For 24 hours, primary dopaminergic neurons were also treated with angiotensin- and/or the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Therefore, the angiotensin-/Mas receptor axis plays a crucial role in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis, and angiotensin- has potential therapeutic value for Parkinson's disease.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34558543


Increased activation of the caudate nucleus and parahippocampal gyrus in Parkinson's disease patients with dysphagia after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a case-control study.

Rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to have a significant effect on impaired swallowing in Parkinson's disease patients with dysphagia. We reviewed reports from 38 PD patients with dysphagia who were receiving medical attention at Beijing Rehabilitation Medicine Academy, Capital Medical University, in this case-control study. For ten days in a row, the patients received high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex every day for ten days. PD patients with dysphagia and healthy controls were compared to physiological magnetic resonance imaging in PD patients with dysphagia and healthy controls. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients with dysphagia showed greater growth in the precentral gyrus, supplement motor zone, and cerebellum before treatment, and this enhanced stimulation was diminished after treatment. In addition, PD patients with dysphagia also experienced improved subjective swallowing sensations after rTMS. After the rTMS of the motor cortex, the swallowing function in PD patients with dysphagia improved.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34558532


From regenerative strategies to pharmacological approaches: can we fine-tune treatment for Parkinson's disease?

Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Therefore, it would be of concern to integrate the two with novel therapies that trigger dopaminergic neurons repair or even differentiation as stem cell-based strategies. Stem cells secretome has been identified as a promising therapeutic treatment for Parkinson's disease, given its ability to modulate cell viability/preservation of dopaminergic neurons. Cell-transplantation-free therapies based on the use of stem cell secretome, such as "Vog's disease's regenerative medicine" may be a viable alternative to regenerative medicine of Parkinson's disease. Thus, in this review, we discuss the current state of stem cell free-based therapies alongside neuroprotective/disease-modifying procedures as a new paradigm for the treatment of central nervous system neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34558504


Immunosuppressants contribute to a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

According to observational studies, a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis has been reduced. To determine the correlation between RA and PD, the effect sizes of five observational studies were combined to determine the correlation between RA and PD. A multivariable MR was also performed to determine the effect of prescription history on PD risk. Integrated results from observational studies showed that RA was associated with a reduced risk of PD in the European population. We discovered that genetically predicted RA was correlated with a reduced risk of PD [odds ratio = 0. 91, P = 0. 007]. Patients with TSMR tended to have an increased prescription of GC and IS, which reduced the risk of PD, respectively. Patients with RA had a reduced risk of PD, but not GC or NSAIDs, according to this study.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35472175

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions