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Parkinson's Disease - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 27 April 2022

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An unusual presentation of convergence insufficiency in a patient with Parkinson's disease stimulated by deep brain stimulation

Observations: A 72-year-old male with Parkinson's disease and hypertension presenting for the examination of blurry vision at near and mid distance after initiating an implanted Deep brain stimulator. Normal pupil exam, conflictual visual fields, and dilated fundus examination resulted in a complete increase in a full range of vision. Conclusions and importance: In several research, the therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation on convergence insufficiency in many studies, in addition to the effects of deep brain stimulation in areas possibly related to vergence regulation, do not appear to be relevant, although not commonly reported.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajoc.2022.101531


Transcranial alternating current stimulation rescues motor deficits in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease via the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor

Background: The therapeutic effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation for Parkinson's disease are limited to modulating abnormally synchronized oscillations; on the other hand, long-lasting tACS results may be related to non-neuronal mechanisms such as neurotrophic variables regulation. In a mouse model of PD, we investigated whether tACS has neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons by regulating endogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor's endogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Results: Stimulation at representative frequencies reduced motor dysfunction and shielded the dopaminergic neurons with increased GDNF production. Motor impairments were reduced to levels comparable to those of levodopa therapy, which was attributable to those of levodopa therapy. In addition, beta-frequency tACS increased the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia n. . . . , which also increased the production of endogenous GDNF in striatal parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Conclusions: The application of tACS over the primary motor cortex may have protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia n. . . . 's substantia n. . . . 's substantia n. . . . through the inception of endogenous GDNF production by striatal parvalbumin-positive interneurons and its survival signaling.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2022.04.002


Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease by investigating the inhibitory effect of serum components on P450 inhibition assay

Abstract Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, after which diagnostic procedures and biomarkers for patients without subjective motor dysfunction have yet to be established. Here, we found out if the P450 inhibitor assay could discriminate sera between patients with PD and healthy people. The results of the study revealed that the P450 inhibition assay could differentiate PD with a region under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0. 814–0. 914 in rats and an AUC value of 0. 910 in humans.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-10528-x


Changes in elbow flexion EMG morphology during adjustment of deep brain stimulator in advanced Parkinson's disease.

Objection Deep brain stimulation is a safe therapy for motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease. Methods Muscle activation studies were done on 13 patients with advanced PD and DBS. The measured EMG signals were analyzed with parameters that characterize the EMG signal morphology, and the results were compared to the adjustment's clinical results. Patients' Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor part rating dropped by 35% on average compared to turning the device off. However, the improvements in UPRDS-III arm tremor and rigidity scores did not change significantly in any settings compared to the optimal stimulation settings. Conclusion The introduction of DBS therapy changes the muscle activation patterns in PD patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266936


The Comparative Efficacy of Non-ergot Dopamine Agonist and Potential Risk Factors for Motor Complications and Side Effects From NEDA Use in Early Parkinson's Disease: Evidence From Clinical Trials

As covariates, a regression was carried out on the incidence of motor disease with treatment duration and NEDA dose as covariates. ResultationThe following was found: Patients treated with NEDA had significantly lower UPDRS total scores, motor scores, and daily living outcomes than those receiving placebos. Patients in the LD and NEDA+open Levodopa groups had lower odds of dyskinesia than patients in the LD group. Patients treated with NEDA or NEDA+open LD had a lower risk of wearing-off problems than those with LD. Patients in the NEDA group were more likely to experience somnolence, edema, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting than those in the placebo or LD group. ConclusionNEDA therapy reduces motor symptoms and raises ADLs in early PD. The likelihood of experiencing motor disease with NEDA were lower with LD than with LD, and dyskinesia was up with increasing LD equivalent doses but was not affected by NEDA treatment durations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2022.831884


The potential applications of traditional Chinese medicine in Parkinson's disease: A new opportunity

This review analyzes the potential of Chinese medicine for the treatment of PD, revealing that Chinese medicine can have anti-PD properties through a multitude of pathways, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways, reducing mitochondrial dysfunction, reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress, and iron death, and regulating intestinal flora. Chinese medicine, in short, is expected to be a promising candidate for PD therapy, based on modern phytochemistry, pharmacology, and genomic proteomics, and needs more clinical trials to clarify its role in PD diagnosis and therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2022.112866


A Multi-Scale Computational Model of Levodopa-Induced Toxicity in Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease is triggered by the gradual loss of dopaminergic cells in substantia n. . . . pars compacta. Several researchers agreed that L-DOPA may be harmful to SNc cells due to oxidative stress. The role of L-DOPA in the course of the PD pathogenesis is also debated. We hypothesize that energy deficiency can lead to L-DOPA-induced toxicity in two ways: first, encouraging dopamine-induced oxidative stress and exacerbating excitotoxicity in SNc. SNc terminals were more susceptible to electricity deficiency than SNc somas, according to the study. During L-DOPA therapy, it was discovered that higher L-DOPA doses resulted in a terminal loss of terminals in SNc. It was also discovered that L-DOPA and glutathione co-administration avoided L-DOPA-induced toxicity in SNc neurons. Our proposed SNc-striatum model is the first of its kind, where SNc neurons are modeled at a biophysical level, and striatal neurons are modeled at a spiking level.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2022.797127


Profile of cognitive impairment in late‐stage Parkinson's disease

Abstract Introduction The profile of cognitive impairment in the late stages of Parkinson's disease is rarely reported. Methods We characterized the cognitive profile of LSPD patients using the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society Task Force's comprehensive assessment tool. Using binary logistic regression analysis, the association of clinical and demographic variables with dementia diagnosis was also investigated. Eighty-four LSPD patients were included, with eighty-four including eighty-four. 25 LSPD patients met the diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in the nondemented group, with a majority of multiple domain impairment and a heterogeneous appearance. Both groups' memory was the most common and significantly impaired cognitive domain. Conclusions In LSPD patients, cognitive dysfunction in several domains was normal. Beneficial determinants of dementia diagnosis were disease misorientation, spectrum integration, verbal learning, and visuoconstructive skills.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.2537


A modified version of the interlocking finger test as a bedside screening test for visuospatial deficits and dementia in Parkinson's disease

According to the dual syndrome model, the primary aim of this research was to see if the Interlocking Finger Test is a reliable bedside screening test for visuospatial abnormalities and/or dementia in Parkinson's disease patients with the intention of facilitating the diagnosis of a dementia disorder associated with posterior cortical and temporal lobe dysfunction. Methods Forty-seven PD patients were screened with the ILFT and a robust cognitive testing kit. We conducted a correlation study to show correlations between the ILFT scores and cognitive as well as motor impairments. With an area under the curve of. 82 and. 88, respectively, the ROC found ILFT 15 as the best predictor of visuospatial deficits and dementia. According to the dual syndrome theory, the ILFT is ideal for detecting signs of the posterior cortical degeneration syndrome.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.2516


A single-arm open-label pilot study of brief mindfulness meditation to control impulsivity in Parkinson's disease.

The cause of Parkinson's disease's neuropsychiatric signs are limiting. Impulsivity rises as a determining factor for impulse control disorders and should therefore be monitored. Mindfulness meditation as a non-drug therapy has been shown to be highly effective in reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as impulsivity, recently. Methods We conducted a prospective single-arm, open-label pilot trial to determine the effectiveness of mindfulness meditation to reduce impulsivity in Parkinson's disease patients. Functional connectivity was enhanced in the default mode network at a cluster of the precuneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, and left posterior lobe and in the medial frontoparietal network at the medial frontal lobe. Patients with PD patients with PD were encouraged to practice mindfulness meditation in order to reduce patients's impulsivity. A short mindfulness meditation program may be helpful in reducing impulsivity in PD and can also influence the DMN's and right FPN's functional connectivity.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266354

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions