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Paraphimosis - Crossref

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Last Updated: 26 January 2022

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Penile Papillomatosis Associated with Persistent Paraphimosis in a Horse

Reparable effects may occur if papillomas are present in certain areas of the body. Paraphimosis is a urological emergency characterized by the penis' inability to retract or impossibility of retention inside the foreskin's skin, triggering local circulatory disorders and severe pain. However, the connection between genital papillomas and the growth of paraphimosis in horses has not been established before. On the penis and foreskin, a 15-year-old mixed-breed horse with persistent phimosis in a horse, Case presented nodular and crusted lesions, similar to warts, which progressed to warts. One of the horse's penis' nodular lesions was removed by an incisional biopsy. Tissue fragments were collected, packed in 10% buffered formaldehyde, and sent for histopathological analysis to the Animal Pathology Laboratory of the University Veterinary Hospital of Campina Grande, Campus de Patos, Paraba, Paragua, Paraba, Campus de Patos, Paraba. The Animal Pathology Laboratory received the penectomy needles. The penectomy product was sent to the Animal Pathology Laboratory. Anti-papillomavirus antibodies were seen in the cytoplasm and keratinocyte nuclei by anti-papillomavirus antibodies in a variety of ways, including the animal's immune system and nutritional status. Papillomavirus infections are usually suboptimal, in comparison to the present case. Eventually, papillomas may be attributed to the occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant tumor.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.22456/1679-9216.104741


Recurrent Canine Paraphimosis: Modified Surgical Approach

Paraphimosis is characterized by persistent penile injury due to the inability to retract the penis into the prepuce, and may result from injuries, viruses, neoplasia, anatomic or neurological abnormalities, or even in its idiopathic form. When it is not possible to have the penis covered by the foreskin by trying it manually, surgical intervention is indicated. Cologne: A 1-year-old male unneutered mixed-breed dog weighing 26 kilograms was submitted for examination with a recurring phimosis background dating back to about 2 months with no apparent cause. After 8 months of the last treatment, the patient is healthy and has no signs of phimosis recurrence, and finding such a disorder remains a challenge. Despite these links, paraphimosis recurrence was reported, and several of the suspected causes, including the inadequate position of the penis inside the foreskin flap during the phallopexy and a lack of predural evidence in its ventral aspect, were discovered. The preputial muscles and the skin tension could loosene with time, but it was not sufficient to avoid or reduce the occurrence of the disease in the recurrence of the condition. The ostium captonated suture also played a role in the tension release during full tissue recovery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.22456/1679-9216.114500


Partial Penectomy in a Horse with Paraphimosis

Following injury to the glans area, a 10-year-old horse weighing 500 kilogram showed clinical signs of paraphimosis, as well as nutritional, economic, and reproductive functions. With the intravenous association of RTU bolus and acepromazine, the horse was tranquilized with intravenous xylazine hydrochloride and acepromazine, followed by anesthesia induction with ready-to-use guaifenesin and maintenance of anesthesia. Because the granulomatous lesions were located in the distal third of the penis and the degree of penile exposure was limited, the partial penectomy procedure was highly effective in removing the penis' permanent exposure. In addition to being safe and widespread, the Williams method was shown to minimize potential urethral stenosis and the development of contact dermatitis by urine. Partial penectomy is a treatment option for cases of traumatic paraphimosis, in which exuberant granulation tissue is generated in the distal third of the penis, and has been present for a long time of evolution.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.22456/1679-9216.113978


Paraphimosis revisited: is chronic paraphimosis a predominantly third world condition?

Paraphimosis is an acute disease characterized by all of the signs of inflammation. Here we provide a ‘chronic' version of paraphimosis in which patients are often seen several days after the initial injury. From 1997 to 2005, we followed 68 patients with this disease. Both patients were treated with excision of the fibrous flap and circumcision under local anaesthesia. This method of modified circumcision was helpful in treating this disease, and we think a new classification of paraphimosis is warranted – acute and chronic.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1258/td.2007.006212


Emergency Management of Paraphimosis

Objective: To investigate the treatment modalities available for paraphimosis, with particular attention on those that pertain to the emergency department. Relevant medical literature was searched through MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Database. In books on Urology, General Surgery, and Emergency Medicine that are available in the Hospital Library, a manual search was conducted. Study selection The literature, Internet, and textbook search key words were "paraphimosis" and "treatment. " Data extraction Relevant full text articles were retrieved through the hospital library network. Conclusion All treatment options are within the capabilities of the emergency physician.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/102490790301000408


Case Report: Penile necrosis associated to paraphimosis with calciphylaxis due to terminal chronic kidney disease

2. 1 Penile necrosis is a rare symptom that can be present in diabetic mellitus or chronic kidney disease sufferers. We describe a case of penile necrosis in a diabetic patient caused by a bout of apophimosis associated with uremic arteriopathy treated with partial amputation. The patient was born with paraphimosis and glans necrosis. In the corpus cavernosum that predicted necrosis, a doppler ultrasound discovered fluid collection in the left corpus cavernosum, parietal vascular calcifications, and vascular insufficiency. Penile necrosis is a rare but critical complication of terminal CKD.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.18834.1


Prepuce: Phimosis, Paraphimosis, and Circumcision

Phimosis is a phenomo in which the prepuce can not be retracted due to the glans penis. In fact, physiologic phimosis is common in male patients up to three years of age, but it does not persist in older age groups. Balanitisxeroticaobliterans is an infiltrative skin disease that causes a pathological phimosis and has been considered the only true indication of circumcision. All of these therapies have the ability to repair the foreskin as their aim, but not require the complete foreskin to be removed. Paraphimosis is a condition in which the foreskin is not retracted.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1100/tsw.2011.31

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions