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Osteophyte - Crossref

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Last Updated: 23 August 2022

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Intracranial hypotension due to ventral thoracic dural tear secondary to osteophyte complex: resolution after transdural thoracic microdiscectomy with dural repair. Illustrative case

paraphrasedoutput:BACKGROUND The following information is based on a BACKGROUND Intracranial hypotension is associated with orthostatic headaches related to cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia. lumbar punctures and spinal surgery are two common iatrogenic etiologies. OBSERVATIONS The authors discussed the case of a 32-year-old woman who had progressively worsening orthostatic headaches. During an extensive examination, magnetic resonance imaging of her thoracic spine revealed a cervicothoracic ventral epidural collection of CSF, triggering a new computed tomography myelogram, which not only helped to identify severe cerebral hypotension but also explored the underlying pathology of a dorsally projected disc osteophyte complex at T2u20133. The patient underwent a transdural thoracic discectomy with dural repair, resulting in her symptoms being resolved. LESSONS The establishment of clear guidelines on the IH secondary to disc osteophyte complexes' administration strategy is yet to be developed. Surgical intervention was highly successful in resolving symptoms for patients in whom conservative medicine failed, with a success rate of 92. 3%.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/case21615


Symptomatic contralateral osteophyte fracture with migration causing lumbar plexopathy during oblique lumbar interbody fusion: illustrative case

paraphrasedoutput:BACKGROUND BACKGROUND While undergoing lateral lumbar interbody fusion surgery, one of the surgical goals is to expose the contralateral side of a Cobb elevator, allowing for distraction of the interbody space. OBSERVATIONS The authors describe a case of symptomatic lumbar plexopathy triggered by an osteophyte fracture after an oblique lumbar interbody fusion that needed a right-sided anterior approach to excise the bone fragment. The authors also discuss how the patient spontaneously electromyogram firing before excision of the osteophyte and how the EMG firing was resolved after excision.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/case21210


Persistent cough associated with osteophyte formation and vagus nerve impingement following cervical spinal surgery

It is a rare occurrence for persistent cough as a result of cervical spinal surgery to osteophytes. The authors explore the case of a 49-year-old woman who had persistent cough following cervical spinal surgery. The patient underwent surgery to free the larynx from the prevertebral fascia and cut the pharyngeal plexus one year after the initial procedure, but her signs persisted. She used a soft cervical collar with padding stitched in the left side to ensure that the larynx would be pushed to the right, a remedy she found on her own in order to prevent the cough. The authors hypothesized that the cough was triggered by vain nerve pain due to osteophyte, based on these results.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2013.4.spine12428


Cervical osteophyte resulting in compression of the jugular foramen

Unidirectional foramen syndrome is characterized by unilateral paresis of cranial nerves IX, X, and XI in the case of extrinsic compression. Finally, CT scanning and contrast MRI revealed a posterior osteophyte arising from the C1u20132 joint space and projecting to the right jugular foramen. This resulted in a jugular foramen syndrome in addition to the patient's right internal jugular vein distal to the osteophyte's. Although the earliest, a posterior cervical osteophyte should be considered in cases of jugular foramen syndrome.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2014.6.spine13908


Updating superficial siderosis of the central nervous system: bleeding of a dorsal osteophyte into the subarachnoid space from a perforating artery

Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system is unusual and often unrecognized disorder that results from recurrent and persistent bleeding into the subarachnoid space. The most common form of therapy is bleeding tracing, but bleeding is often not apparent. The discovery and surgical correction of bleeding remains the most effective method of therapy, but the source of bleeding is often not apparent. A new correlation has been drawn between chronic bleeding in the CNS and spinal abnormalities in the spine. The present case concerns a 48-year-old man who presented with long-standing signs of mild hearing loss and mild gait ataxia. In the anterior epidural space of T8-u20139's anterior epidural space of T8 and CT, a small calcific osteophyte was detected by MRI and CT. The patient underwent surgical removal of the bone spur and dural tear repair. In the literature currently available, a perforating artery on an osteophyte bleeding into a subarachnoid space has never been identified.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.7.spine18300


Use of the caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte as an early marker for future development of osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia in dogs

U2014In each of 24 sex- and size-matched pairs fed the same diet, a restricted-fed dog was fed 25% less than a control dog for life. On 45 dogs, histologic examination of hip joint tissues was performed. Dogs with a CCO were 3. 7 times more likely to develop radiographic signs of osteoarthritis than those without a CCO, according to adjusting for feeding group. 65% of controlled-fed dogs with a CCO developed radiographic signs of osteoarthritis, and 55% of restricted-fed dogs with a CCO demonstrated osteoarthritis. In 22 of 29 dogs with osteoarthritis, the CCO was the first radiographic change seen in the first radiographic change seen in 22 of 29 dogs with osteoarthritis. Overall, 35 of 35 dogs with a CCO had osteoarthritis chondrites. In Labrador Retrievers compared to their life span, their conclusions and clinical relevance show a correlation between a CCO on the femoral neck and subsequent onset of radiographic signs of osteoarthritis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.2004.225.233


The posterior cervical foraminotomy in the treatment of cervical disc/osteophyte disease: a single-surgeon experience with a minimum of 5 years' clinical and radiographic follow-up

object This paper explores long-term clinical and radiographic findings after a single-level posterior cervical cancer for degenerative disc or osteophyte disease. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of 162 cases involving patients treated by a single surgeon using a posterior cervical foraminotomy. Patients who had undergone previous surgery, those who underwent bilateral procedures, and those who required foraminotomy as a result of a larger laminectomy were excluded. The Neck Disability Index was used for a clinical follow-up, and a radiographic follow-up was done using static and dynamic lateral radiographs to measure focal and segmental alignment and disc-space height changes. Conclusions The mean NDI score on NDI was 18 compared to the 18th average. The mean preoperative segmental curvature between C-2 and C-7 was 18. 0 u00b0, which was the mean preoperative focal angulation at the surgically treated level. In 150 patients, an increase in NDI scores was seen. The mean postoperative segmental angulation was 17. 6 percentu00b0 for the mean, while mean postoperative segmental angulation was 17. 6 u00b0 angulation was 17. 6 u00b0. In 30 patients, nine of whom had clinical signs and four of whom needed further surgical intervention, four of whom required further surgical intervention. After the initial foraminotomy Conclusions The posterior cervical foraminotomy is a popular method for treating patients with cervical sagittal alignment, with age > 60 at initial surgery, the presence of preoperative cervical lordosis of 10,00b0, and the need for posterior surgery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2008.12.spine08576


Beauty parlor stroke syndrome due to a bone fragment from an osteophyte of the atlas: case report

Parlor stroke syndrome is a rare occurrence characterized by mechanical impingement of a vertebral artery during neck rotation and/or hypertension, followed by vertebrobasilar insufficiency. However, there have been no reports of BPSS in which the cause of mechanical impingement was identified or no instances for which surgical intervention was indicated. The right VA was hypoplastic, and the left VA was dominant, according to these studies. The possibility of this mechanism of VA constriction by a free bone fragment should be considered in BPSS patients with recurrent transient symptoms.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.7.spine17226


Extracranial internal carotid artery dissection caused by compression from a giant osteophyte due to atlantoaxial osteoarthritis: case report

The authors explore the first documented case of symptomatic ICA dissection owing to atlantoaxial osteoarthritis in a newborn era. In the differential diagnosis of ICA dissection in patients with a severely deformed cervical spine, Atlantoaxial osteoarthritis should be factored in.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.1.spine161047


Evaluation of a radiographic caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte on the femoral neck and its relationship to degenerative joint disease and distraction index in dogs

Objective u2014 To determine the prevalence of a radiographic curvilinear osteophyte on the femoral neck in a variety breeds and age groups of dogs, as well as the contemporaneous correlation with degenerative joint disease and distraction index. As determined by the use of distraction radiography, statistical techniques were used to analyze the CCO as a risk factor for DJD and determine its relationship with DI. DJD was present on radiographic evidence in 25 percent of dogs with a CCO, 25 percent had radiographic evidence of DJD. About 4% of dogs without a CCO had DJD. Dogs with a CCO were 8. 9 times more likely to have DJD than did those without a CCO. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance u2014 results show that contemporaneous links between the CCO and DJD are confirmed, and that passive hip laxity, as determined by use of the DI, is linked to both the CCO and DJD.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.2002.220.472

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions