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Naloxone - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 13 August 2022

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The role of increasing pharmacy and community distributed naloxone in the opioid overdose epidemic in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New York City

Background: Naloxone's delivery to people at risk of opioid overdose has reduced overdose death rates, but studies of retail pharmacy-distributed naloxone with overdose mortality have not been investigated. Using a linear model, we regressed opioid-related overdose deaths on retail-pharmacy and community naloxone production, as well as community-level demographics, hypothesizing that areas with high overdose risk would have higher current naloxone levels and community naloxone availability, but that decreasing naloxone delivery from one quarter to the next will be correlated with reduced overdose. The concurrent naloxone prescription was positively and significantly associated with deadly opioid overdose rates. We did not find any associations between naloxone delivery rates and overdose deaths. To solve the opioid overdose epidemic in the United States, high rates of overdose triggered by fentanyl's drug supply are driving high, and harm reduction measures are required, as well as higher naloxone volumes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dadr.2022.100083


Disparities in naloxone prescriptions in a University Hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic

In 2019 and 2020, the aim of this research was to determine the naloxone prescribing rate in patients with opioid use disorder at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. In 2020, 609 unique patients with OUD were seen in 2019, 29,959 visits in 2019, compared to 11,661 visits from 2,641 unique patients; 619 naloxone prescriptions were issued in 2019 and 619 in 2020. In 2020, more naloxone prescriptions were given to uninsured patients in 2020, and more OUD patients were admitted to inpatient settings and received more naloxone prescriptions in the inpatient setting in the 2020 cohort compared to 2019. Conclusions Our results show that improving naloxone education in physicians and prescribing for patients with OUD, particularly in emergency department and outpatient settings.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12954-022-00667-9


Treatment retention in opioid agonist therapy: comparison of methadone versus buprenorphine/naloxone by analysis of daily-witnessed dispensed medication in a Canadian Province

Abstract Background The last decade has seen a drastic rise in illicit opioid use in Canada and internationally, which is correlated with substantial rises in opioid related morbidity and mortality in both Canada and internationally. In Nova Scotia, the study aims to describe the relative recovery rates for first episode opioid replacement therapy for methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone for patients receiving daily witnessed dispensed medications. Methods of Study In Nova Scotia between 2014 and 2018, a longitudinal descriptive study looked at secondary results from the Nova Scotia Prescription Monitoring Program on patients 18 years of age and older who started first episode opioid therapy with methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid use disorder. The treatment episode was scheduled as the start of the first opioid antagonist prescription until there is a period of more than six days without receiving opioid agonist medication at a pharmacy. Buprenorphine/naloxone use as compared to methadone led to an elevated risk of treatment dropout by 62%, according to a multivariate cox proportional hazards model. Patients treated with buprenorphine/naloxone for a total of 25 days were 74 days for patients treated with methadone, while 69 days for patients treated with methadone was 69 days. Conclusions Our results show that methadone is a numerically superior drug for opioid use disorder when the metric of treatment retention is considered in isolation for our Nova Scotia population. Whether selecting which drug to start for a patient with an OAT for opioid use disorder is important.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-022-04175-9


A qualitative examination of naloxone access in three states: Connecticut, Kentucky, and Wisconsin

The aim of the current report was to investigate the cultural context of naloxone use in three separate states from the perspective of key informants, who may play a part in dispensing or administering naloxone within their communities. Participants also highlighted the key role of harm reduction initiatives in distributing naloxone within their communities, as well as obstacles to increasing naloxone availability in pharmacies. Conclusions: According to the studies, public health programs aimed at naloxone delivery through harm reduction initiatives could improve access among local communities. Overall, strategies that promote the affordability and availability of naloxone through the pharmacy may also support naloxone expansion efforts, as well as those that combat stigmatizing attitudes against people who use opioids and harm reduction.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-13741-5


More than just availability: Who has access and who administers take-home naloxone in Baltimore, MD.

Background In the United States, opioid overdose is a common public health issue. Methods of injecting drugs in a Baltimore, Maryland-based survey of 577 people who use opioids and had a history of injecting opioids. A sub-analysis looked at the correlations of the THN system among those with THN access and who experienced an overdose. In the multivariable model, decreased THN access was attributed to the fear that a person will become aggressive after being revived with THN, police threaten people at an overdose attack, and insufficient overdose education. The N was administered by approximately half of PWUO with THN access and who had witnessed an overdose. Conclusion THN programs must have confidence in administering THN and overcoming challenges to use, such as the fear of a THN recipient being aggressive. An overdose prevention scheme includes a standardized change around carrying THN.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0224686


Fatal overdose prevention and experience with naloxone: A cross-sectional study from a community-based cohort of people who inject drugs in Baltimore, Maryland.

PWID's increasing overdose mortality as a result of the influx of synthetic opioids in the drug market can be offset by improved naloxone availability and use. Methods During 2018, a questionnaire was sent to 915 participants in the AIDS Linked to the IntraVenous Experience study, a continuing community-based observational database of people who currently inject or previously inject drugs in Baltimore, Maryland. In order to identify naloxone use among PWID's high-risk population, we investigated the correlations of naloxone results with socio-demographic, opioid use, and healthcare utilization factors in order to identify gaps in naloxone delivery among this high-risk group. Among PWID's healthcare facilities, accessing drugs for substance use disorder was positively associated with receiving naloxone, the ambulance service's response to 911 calls for overdose, and syringe services programs, in which naloxone use and carrying could be encouraged.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0230127

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions