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Naloxone - Crossref

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Last Updated: 13 August 2022

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Effectiveness of Take-Home Naloxone Programs in Athletic Training: An Evidence-to-Practice Review

The number of opioid overdoses has increased in recent years, and has become more complex as a result of the co-involvement of both prescription and illicit opioid use. While there is ample evidence to back up the effectiveness of take-home naloxone kits, there are no results to back up the naloxone's use in the reversal of opiate OD. The authors planned to include studies into THN services that both trained opioid users in OD prevention and reported on OD outcomes. In order to determine the results of public health intervention in cases where randomized control trials are not economically feasible or economically feasible, the Bradford Hill criteria and five additional criteria were used as dependent variables. There are no applications for organized sports, but for THN programs, individuals who are prescribed opioids for pain relief are unlikely.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.31622/2021/04.2.4


Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution Programmes and the Ethics of Task Shifting

One of OEND's goals is to help resolve the health-related inequities common among people who use drugs, which includes minimizing the discrepation between people who use drugs and the formal healthcare system. Public health professionals must consider the ethical implications of task shifting services that may inadvertently hurt already vulnerable populations, according to Wesley. Though OEND programs reduce opioid-related deaths, we suspect that even if OEND efforts reduce opioid-related deaths, we're also concerned that OEND services could also disenfranchise geographically poor populations from integrated healthcare services, including mainstream emergency care.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/phy001


Interdisciplinary Health Care Professionals’ Perceptions of the Causes and Consequences of the Opioid Crisis: Developing Rural Community Partnerships to Increase Access to Naloxone

Thousands of people die each year from opioid overdoses, and overdose deaths continue to rise. To analyze survey findings from continuing medical education sessions in rural communities, the community and university partners used a consensual qualitative research approach in this study. The health care professionals interviewed had varying reactions towards the opioid crisis, ranging from empathy for patients to denial that an opioid crisis exists. Understanding health care professionals' perspectives of the opioid crisis will help public health and university teams implement safe interventions in opioid prescription, naloxone use, and stigma reduction to reduce opioid use and overdose, which may ultimately lessen opioid use and overdose.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.54656/nbmf4249


Sucrose consumption increases naloxone-induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in limbic forebrain

Surose intake leads to endogenous opioid release, impacting feeding habits as well as other opioid-mediated behaviors, such as analgesia, dependency, and withdrawal, according to reliable research. Rats were first introduced to a 10% sucrose solution or water for 3 wk, and then injected with 10 mg/kg naloxone or saline in the present study. Susrose intake or naloxone injection were present in several regions, but significant interactions were only evident in the central nucleus of the amygdala and the lateral division of the periaqueductal gray. The central nucleus of the amygdala is a key player in the integration of gustatory, hedonic, and autonomic signals as they relate to sucrose intake, if not to food intake limits in general, according to the results.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.2000.278.3.r712


Naloxone dosage for opioid reversal: current evidence and clinical implications

Opioid-related deaths is on the rise in the United States, and there were over 33,000 opioid-related deaths in 2015. Reversal of opioid toxicity may lead to an opioid-withdrawal syndrome. Patients who have received large doses or long-acting opioid formulations are likely to die or re-narcotize after a single dose of naloxone in patients who have taken large doses or long-acting opioid formulations, but many opioid agonists have a shorter effect than that of many opioid agonists.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/2042098617744161


Sexual Preference of Crossbreed Ewes for Rams Medicated with Naloxone

Ewe sexual preference is influenced by several factors; ram attractiveness is crucial. For the first trial two rams were treated with 0. 5 mg naloxone in 15 days, two control rams were treated with saline injections. On the first week of therapy, testosterone levels were not significantly different between treated and control rams; however, in the second week of therapy, testosterone plasma levels in naloxone treated rams hit levels of 15 ng/mL compared to six ng/mL in control rams. During the first trial, 11 ewes displayed high proceptivity and receptivity for the naloxone treated ram and were mated, but only one ewe expressed absolute preference for the control ram. 19 ewes also had high proceptivity and receptivity for naloxone-treated rams in the second trial, according to the trial.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.47191/rajar/v8i8.03


Tracking Community Naloxone Dispensing: Part of a Strategy to Reduce Overdose Deaths

In 2018, DOHMH hopes to deliver more than 100,000 kits to communities in NYC with the highest overdose burden, from 2,500 kits to 61,706 kits. In 2018, DOHMH hopes to reach a global database of naloxone kit recipients, which is likely to reach individual-level geographic information about naloxone kits recipients. However, we could not determine if naloxone kit dispensing reached people in neighborhoods with high overdose deaths without personal-level geographic information, but we couldn't decide whether naloxone kit dispensing reached people in communities with high overdose mortality rates. We then imported forms into TeleForm, which converts the NRF data directly into a database without the need for manual data entry and only modest need for data verification. According to the second component of the NRF scheme, larger organizations and dispensers in clinical settings with electronic health records are able to submit data extracts to DOHMH that are obtained directly from organizations' u2019 data sources. Using Q1 2018 results, a visual inspection of OOPP-level distribution and individual-level dispensing charts shows the difference between OOPP-level distribution results and individual-level dispensing results.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v11i1.9932


Optimization of Linkage between North Carolina EMS and ED Data: EMS Naloxone Cases

Objective: Through an iterative, deterministic approach, the opioid overdose crisis in North Carolina has rapidly grown in North Carolina, mirroring the epidemic throughout the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in North Carolina has increased by nearly 40% annually since 2015. 1 A key to reducing overdose deaths in NC has been increasing access to naloxone, a life-saving drug that can reverse overdose symptoms and progression. Over 700 ambulance companies in NC respond to over 12,000 calls per year; the corresponding ED visit helps with understanding these patients's health information. However, less than 66% of NC EMS records with naloxone administration in 2017 were subsequently traced to an ED visit record, which was surprisingly close to an ED visit record. The EMS Performance Improvement Center2 investigated how to increase EMS and ED data linkage between January 1, 2017 and November 30, 2017 from 12 NC counties, focusing on eastern, central and western regions and the overall linkage results of the larger dataset. The initial applications to the statewide EMS dataset linkedage of 91. 0%, with no more false positives. The age of linked patients in statewide surveys was younger than that of unlinked patients. In addition, linked patients were more likely to be male when compared to unlinked patients. Conclusions: In addition, linked patients were more likely to be male than unlinked patients. We increased the linkage of EMS encounters with documented naloxone administration to ED visits in North Carolina in 2017 from 64. 8% to 91 percent, with less than 0. 05 percent false positive rates. References1. Implementation of probabilistic linkage or machine learning as a final stage in a multistage process may help with linkage outcomes by eliminating missing data or unpredictable errors in the results. Cohen MK, Kansagra SM, Cohen MK.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v11i1.9765


Barriers and facilitators to naloxone uptake in Ohio: implications for community-driven overdose reduction interventions

Naloxone is a life-saving, fast-to-administer opioid antagonist drug that is easy to handle. Understanding the barriers and facilitators to naloxone's community involvement will help inform steps to improve the availability, and use of naloxone. We used qualitative thematic analysis to identify barriers and facilitators to naloxone use in a community setting. The findings An total of 47 Central Ohio residents took part in five focus group discussions and 15 in-depth interviews. Despite Ohio's Good Samaritan law and the constitutionality of naloxone, poor communication of naloxone regulations was a frequent barrier to naloxone use, as was the burden of law enforcement to respond to and treat overdoses. Conclusions: Community-based initiatives that foster collaborations among local organisations to provide naloxone information, instruction, and distribution may address significant barriers to naloxone use and reduce the current burden of law enforcement to respond to overdoses.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-1835725/v1


Awareness, Possession, and Use of Take-Home Naloxone Among Illicit Drug Users, Vancouver, British Columbia, 2014-2015

Although take-home naloxone programs are essential in preventing overdose deaths among opioid users, opium users are not known, the uptake of THN among people who use opioids is uncertain. Methods: Participants in two prospective cohort studies of PWUD in Vancouver, December 1, 2014, to May 29, 2015, developed a standardized questionnaire that asked about the use, ownership, and use of THN; sociodemographic characteristics; and opioid use patterns. Despite 769 people overall being aware of THN, only 88 of 392 opioid users had a THN kit, 18 of whom had previously administered naloxone, while 18 of whom had previously administered naloxone. Conclusion: Attempts to raise awareness of and participation in the THN program may have contributed to reduced opioid overdose deaths in Vancouver.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/0033354917717230

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions