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Muscular Dystrophy - Astrophysics Data System

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Last Updated: 09 May 2022

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Drug screening in a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Human muscular dystrophy is demonstrated by two well-known zebrafish dystrophin mutants, sapje and sapje-like, on both sapje and sapje. We've searched the Prestwick chemical library for small molecules that alter the muscle phenotype in these fish using these dystrophin-null zebrafish. The identification of compounds, especially PDE inhibitors, that characterize these dystrophin-null zebrafish's muscle phenotypes, supports the screening procedure described here, which may lead to candidate molecules being used as therapeutic interventions in human muscular dystrophy.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PNAS..108.5331K/abstract


Annexin A6 modifies muscular dystrophy by mediating sarcolemmal repair

Muscle weakness is exacerbated by muscle breakdown as a result of muscle injury to skeletal muscle myofibers and, specifically, membrane rupture of muscle tissue. Truncated annexin A6 protein was found to hinder membrane repair by disrupting the development of the normal annexin A6-rich cap and repair zone. These results reveal annexin A6's involvement in muscle membrane leakage and muscular dystrophy.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PNAS..111.6004S/abstract


Wnt7a treatment ameliorates muscular dystrophy

Pediatric debilitating muscle loss and wasting, followed by progressive debilitating muscle loss and wasting, and ultimately death in the second or third decade of life. Using the mdx mouse model, we investigated the therapeutic potential of Wnt7a for focal treatment of dystrophic DMD muscles in mdx mice, and discovered that Wnt7a treatment stimulated satellite cell proliferation and myofiber hypertrophy in treated mucles in mdx mice. In human primary myotubes, we discovered that Wnt7a induced myotube hypertrophy, as well as a change in fiber type toward twitch.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PNAS..10920614V/abstract


Missense mutations in dystrophin that trigger muscular dystrophy decrease protein stability and lead to cross-β aggregates

Muscle cells are dystrophinic, and muscular dystrophy is triggered by a deficiency of functional dystrophin protein. More than half of missense mutations that cause the disease are found in the N-terminal actin binding domain, according to the N-terminal actin binding domain. Compared to WT, three mutants, L54R, A168D, and A171P, have decreased helicity and do not have a cooperative sigmoidal melt with temperature, indicating that these mutations exist in a variety of conformations or in a "molten globule" state. These aggregates have an intermolecular cross- structure similar to that found in amyloid diseases, including the FT-IR, circular dichroism, rise in thioflavin T fluorescence, and the congo red spectral shift and birefringence. These findings show that disease-causing mutants influence N-ABD equilibrium by decreasing its thermodynamic stability and increasing the number of misfolding, lowering the net functional dystrophin concentration.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PNAS..10715069S/abstract


Deletion of periostin reduces muscular dystrophy and fibrosis in mice by modulating the transforming growth factor-β pathway

In the sarcoglycan null mouse model of muscular dystrophy, we show that up-regulation and misinformation of periostin is pathological and contributes to disease. In addition, MD mice lacking the Postn gene showed dramatic changes in skeletal muscle structure and function. Mechanistically, a Postn gene deletion modified TGF-signing, triggering TGF- signaling in such a way that it now enhanced tissue repair with reduced fibrosis. These results show that periostin acts as a disease determinant in MD by promoting/allowing TGF-'s pathological consequences, which may lead to the inhibition of periostin, which could be a unique treatment strategy.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PNAS..10910978L/abstract


Toward the correction of muscular dystrophy by gene editing

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a particularly severe genetic disorder attributed to mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a membrane-associated protein required for muscle repair and function. Patients with DMD begin to lose mobility early in life, resulting in premature death from cardiac and respiratory failure. DMD mutations have been eliminated from CRISPR gene editing, providing new opportunities to treat the disease and thereby restore dystrophin expression in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Lessons' findings showed that gene editing could be used for many other disorders of muscle and other tissues in the future.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2021PNAS..11804840O/abstract


Enhancing human aspects of care with young people with muscular dystrophy: An evaluation of a participatory qualitative study with clinicians

In two Canadian neuromuscular clinics, this paper reviews a research that sought to improve clinical care for young people with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy and their families. Living with MD is a complex condition that involves many aspects of being healthy. We have a report on how/why the study changed clinical practices in relation to the 'human' dimensions of living with MD. Methods and techniques The intervention involved regular dialogical discussions with clinicians across the two sites, during which direct observations of the clinics' care services were discussed and reforms were planned. We moved away from realistic evaluation methods to measure changes in clinical care as a result of the intervention. The clinical teams shifted their thinking and practices toward greater consideration of human aspects of living with MD, including: more regularly attending to emotional, socioeconomic, and experiential aspects of healthcare; and consideration of affective aspects of clinical care.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022PLoSO..1763956S/abstract


Development of Duchenne Video Assessment scorecards to evaluate ease of movement among those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy develop compensatory movement patterns as muscles weaken. Caregivers are encouraged by the DVA to film patients' specific mobility tasks at home using a secure mobile device, and licensed physical therapists assess the videos based on predefined compensatory movement criterion information. The panel was comprised of eight PTs who had evaluated 50 patients with DMD and participated in 10 DMD clinical trials. Panelists in Round 1, a questionnaire and scoringcard were used to assess compensatory movement criteria. There were 47 revisions to the wording of 150 compensatory movement rules, 20 questions were added, 20 questions were modified, and 30 criteria were removed during the Round 2 revisions to the scorecards. Conclusions PTs with extensive experience evaluating patients with DMD reported that the compensation performance measurement in the DVA scorecards were clear, comprehensive, and clinically valid.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022PLoSO..1766845C/abstract


TLR4 is a regulator of trained immunity in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages from a murine model of DMD have cardinal characteristics of training immunity, including transcriptional hyperresponsiveness associated with metabolic and epigenetic remodeling. TLR4-dependent and epigenetic changes in bone marrow-derived macrophages from dystrophic mice are TLR4-dependent. TLR4-dependence of trained macrophages homing to injured muscles from the bone marrow was also confirmed by research from Adoptive transfer experiments. DMD's dysregulated inflammation is promoted by a TLR4-regulated, memory-like capacity of innate immunity inherited at the bone marrow's level, which contributes to dysregulated inflammation in DMD.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022NatCo..13..879B/abstract


Development of a novel startle response task in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

The objective of this methodological task development study was to: i confirm the task's effectiveness; ii standardize data processing processes; ii determine the most appropriate outcome measures. Two neutral visual cues were given: one'safe' cue alone; one 'threat' cue paired with a threat stimulus aversive noise to allow for the conditioning of physiological startle responses, SCR, and heart rate. Based on empirical results, we report the protocol design and optimization of data processing techniques. Compared to'safe' trials P . 001, we found that the task was highly effective in producing significant startle SCR in reinforced 'threat' trials. With the most accurate physiological outcome measure when compared to SCR area and change in heart rate, with the most complete report on data processing, the least variance, successful conditioned response retention P =. 01, and reliability analysis in test-retest analysis rho = 86.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022PLoSO..1764091M/abstract

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions