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Multiple Sclerosis - MedlinePlus Genetics

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 13 September 2022

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Multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is characterized by areas of damage to the brain and spinal cord. These lesions are related to the deterioration of nerve-protecting clothing and promotes the rapid transmission of nerve impulses and damage to nerve cells. Multiple sclerosis is regarded as an autoimmune disorder; auto immune systems malfunctions and invades the body's own tissues and organs, in this case, the nervous system's tissues. Multiple sclerosis is a common disorder in early adulthood, affecting people aged 20 to 40. Multiple sclerosis sufferers have muscle control problems. Multiple sclerosis is also linked to vision difficulties, such as blurred or double vision, partial or complete vision loss, are all typical of multiple sclerosis. Infections that cause fever can make the symptoms worse. Multiple sclerosis can take many forms, including relapsing-remitting MS, secondary progressive MS, primary progressive MS, and progressive relapsing MS. The most common is the relapsing-remitting disorder, which affects approximately 80% of people with multiple sclerosis. Secondary progressive MS is the next most common disorder after about ten years of relapse-remitting MS, which affects approximately 10% to 20% of people with multiple sclerosis. Primary progressive MS typically begins later than other forms around age 40. Progressive relapsing MS is a rare form of multiple sclerosis with recurrent symptoms that first appears to be primary progressive MS. However, people with progressive relapsing MS also suffer clinical manifestations of more severe signs.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/multiple-sclerosis


Neuromyelitis optica

Optica neuritis, or inflammation of the nerve that moves information from the eye to the brain, is characteristic of neuromyelitis optica. Eye pain and vision loss can occur in one or both eyes. Optic neuritis contributes eye pain and vision loss, and can occur in one or both eyes. Neuromyelitis optica is also known as transverse myelitis, or spinal cord inflammation. The inflammation that causes transverse myelitis damages the spinal cord, causing a lesion that often extends the length of three or more bones of the spine. Other effects of spinal cord injury may include pains, loss of bladder and bowel control, uncontrollable diarrhea, and nausea. In addition, muscle weakness can make breathing difficult and may lead to life-threatening respiratory difficulties in people with neuromyelitis optica. However, most of those people are affected individuals will suffer persistent muscle pain and vision loss that persist even between episodes. People with this disorder may also suffer from persistent muscle weakness, paralysis, and vision loss. Both childhood and adulthood can develop neuromyelitis optica, but the most common condition starts in a person's forties. Approximately one-quarter of people with neuromyelitis optica have signs or symptoms of another autoimmune disorder such as myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or Sju00f6gren syndrome. According to some researchers, a condition in Japanese patients named as optic-spinal multiple sclerosis that affects the nerves of the eye and central nervous system is the same as neuromyelitis optica.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/neuromyelitis-optica


Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

Optic neuropathy, Leber'seditary optic neuropathy, is a common form of vision loss. Vision problems may develop in one eye or in both eyes simultaneously; if vision loss begins in one eye, the other eye is usually affected within a few weeks to months. Vision in both eyes worsens as a result of a significant loss of sharpness and color vision over time, as seen in both eyes. Vision loss results from cell death in the nerve that relays visual signals from the eyes to the brain. Although central vision slowly improves in a small number of cases, in most cases, the vision loss is gradual and permanent. Vision loss is generally the only symptom of LHON, according to LHON; however, some families with additional signs and symptoms have been identified. In addition to vision loss, LHON plus's key features include mobility disorders, tremors, and abnormalities of the electrical signals that regulate the heartbeat.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/leber-hereditary-optic-neuropathy

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions