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Multiple Myeloma - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

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Last Updated: 13 May 2022

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Impact of autologous stem cell transplantation on long term renal function and associated progression-free and overall survival in multiple myeloma.

Not sure about the long-term effects of Autologous hematolytic stem cell transplantation on renal function, as well as the effects of renal function on progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with multiple myeloma are unclear. To investigate correlations between the eGFR, PFS, and OS, we used linear mixed effect models to explore the change in estimated glomerular filtration rate and a joint model approach to investigate associations between the eGFR, PFS, and OS. There was no link between eGFR and PFS or OS. KEY POINTS The development of MM stage at diagnosis was correlated with reduced eGFR in all stages of chronic kidney disease. In none of the reports, eGFR was not associated with PFS or OS, but disease-related causes leading to reduced eGFR, PFS, and OS were all associated with reduced eGFR, PFS, and OS. ASCT did not adversely affect kidney function, but it did not reduce the risk of CKD on MM outcomes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2020.1797719


The effects of MicroRNA deregulation on pre-RNA processing network in multiple myeloma.

In patient CD138+ MM cells, a significant number of miRs that are either up- or down-regulated are found, but not in healthy donors CD138+ plasma cells, indicating target genes involved in early stages of pre-mRNA splicing. We also identified deregulated miRs that target the main splicing factors and modifiers that result in altered splicing in MM. Importantly, deregulated expression of the genes that control the splicing network promotes increased intron retention, a novel feature of the MM genome, by inducing deregulated expression of the genes that regulate the splicing network.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41375-019-0498-5


Epigenetic-Based Mechanisms of Osteoblast Suppression in Multiple Myeloma Bone Disease.

The development of osteolytic lesions, which cause significant complications impacting the morbidity, mortality, and treatment of myeloma patients is characterized by multiple myeloma bone disease. Myeloma tumors embedded within the bone microenvironment promote osteocalcination hyperactivation and osteoblast differentiation suppression. Bone marrow cell differentiation into functioning osteoblasts is a chronic condition that has existed for years. In the absence of active disease, bone marrow stromal cells' differentiation into functioning osteoblasts are present in patients. Ineffective bone anabolic activities are not sufficient to restore MM lesions effectively. In the context of the inflammatory myeloma microenvironment, we will explore epigenetic plasticity in osteoprogenitor cells' differentiation commitment and quantifying the role of chromatin modifiers in MSC-lineage transition from osteogenic to adipogenic. We will also address the possibility of using small molecule epigenetic inhibitors, currently used in the MM study as therapeutics and bone anabolic agents in the prevention or repair of osteolytic lesions in MM.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm4.10183

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions