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Mines - Crossref

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Last Updated: 18 July 2022

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Comprehensive Assessment on the Environmental Conditions of Abandoned and Inactive Mines in the Philippines

Most abandoned and inactive mines in the Philippines pose significant dangers to human health and the environment due to the disturbed and exposed heavy metal-laden soils, sediments, and water-filled open pit mines. In this paper, integrated methods with combined vital testing, sampling, and analysis of various environmental media present in the mine site are recommended in order to contribute to the solution on abandoned and inactive mines.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.29037/ajstd.623


The Effect of Unionization on Productivity: Evidence from a Long Panel of Coal Mines

Based on a sample of West Virginia coal mines from 1897 to 1928, the author examines the effect of unionization on productivity based on a panel of 1897 to 1928. The effect of unionization on productivity is measured in physical terms, and the majority of the mines in the panel changed union status at least once, but not simultaneously, so the panel is about right for investigating the impact of unionization on productivity. Several reports point to lower investment in union mines relative to nonunion mines, but the fact is circumstantial and causality is uncertain.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793916682222


Choosing of fire extinguishing medium in coal mines on the basis of accident autocorrelation analysis

The article describes a plant in the Russian Federation that produces non-renewable energy resources. The paper has reviewed statistical results of U044141oal mine accidents in the United States based on the challenges of ensuring technological integration and fire protection at such facilities. The main reason of death in coal mines isn't the crash itself, but endogenous fires and emergencies that follow it. Regression analysis was used to determine autocorrelation in the study of dynamics of accidents in coal mines. It has been found that the leading cause of death in coal mines accidents are not collapses and explosions but endogenous fires. Conclusions on the causes of fatal accidents have been drawn, and a dependence on the number of casualties on the accident has been established.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.25257/fe.2022.2.27-34


Chemical Composition and Toxicity of PM10 and PM0.1 Samples near Open-Pit Mines and Coal Power Stations

A ten-u03bcm in diameter indicates an extremely diverse and varied group of objects that can penetrate the human respiratory tract. The present research sought to find samples of coarse and ultrafine PM at a certain distance from polluting companies. After 6 h of in vitro exposure to PM samples, toxicity was determined in human MRC-5 lung fibroblasts. Except for PM samples obtained from the control point, the proliferation of MRC-5 cells exposed to PM10 at the same rate was significantly lower than that of MRC-5 cells exposed to PM10 at the same rate. Even those that were collected from control territories such as PM0. 1 samples, u2014growed genotoxicity in comparison to PM10. u2014bought increased genotoxicity as compared to PM10, according to PM0. 1 datau2014even those that were collected from control territoriesu2014 showed elevated genotoxicity increased genotoxicity in comparison to PM10. The study's findings reveal that UFPs merit special attention as a biological agent, which is distinct from larger PMs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/life12071047


Hierarchical structure of aerological risks in coal mines

Based on the hierarchical organization of a hazard, a method for assessing and assessing aerological risk in coalmines has been developed to analyze and monitor the effects of the rapid installation of volatile aerological factors. The aerological safety of mines can be determined by aerological risk: the lower the risks, the better the protection, the safer. The I rank's aerological risks are considered as aerological risk covering the entire mine, as well as structural difficulties; aerological hazards of the II rank include layers, wings, and deposits; aerological risks of III rank concern distinct mining or development sites. A block diagram of aerological dangers of III rank has been created, identifying the key dangers in the excavation and construction industries, as well as the various forms of vulnerability of the excavation techniques and de breathable dead-end workings. The absence of a diagonal connection in the excavation area's lowest values of aerological risk III rank are characterized by mixed ventilation schemes; in the absence of a diagonal connection, the presence of unstable diagonal connection raises the aerological risk by 2. 7 times.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21177/1998-4502-2022-14-2-276-285


Coal mine dust lung disease in miners killed in the Upper Big Branch disaster: a review of lung pathology and contemporary respirable dust levels in underground US coal mines

17 people with evaluable lung tissue were found in autopsy examinations, with 17 of whom were suspected of coal workers u2019 pneumoconiosis. UBB fatalities' respiratory tissue samples were analyzed by histopathological findings of lung tissue from a sample of UBB fatalities in order to analyze the respirable dust concentrations experienced by these miners at UBB relative to other U. S. coal mines. Methods Occupational pulmonary pathologists inspected lung tissue samples from UBB fatalities for the presence of pneumoconiosis-related characteristics. Conclusions Although UBB's average respirable dust and quartz levels were higher than average, over 200 U. S. underground coal mines had higher dust concentrations than average, although more frequent than average respirable dust and quartz levels were observed. These findings, along with lung histopathological studies in UBB deaths, indicate that exposures contributing to CWP in the United States are more prevalent than previously believed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2021-107694


A Model to Determine the Number of Rescue Brigades in Underground Mines using the Risk Factor Approach

Mine rescue techniques have undergone significant changes over the past decade. Most countries use a mine-owned rescue scheme, and the number of rescue brigades required in a mine is country-specific and determined by the host country's mining laws. According to a study of mining laws globally, the number of brigades needed in a mine depends solely on the number of people working underground. The number of rescue brigades required in a mine depends on: the mine's safety culture; the number of people employed per shift; the number of active mines; and the nearness and responsiveness of sister rescue teams.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4314/gm.v22i1.4

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions