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Migraine - MedlinePlus Genetics

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 22 June 2022

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Migraine

A migraine is a type of headache that often causes throbbing pain in one area of the head. People can go from one year to several times a week. A person is thought to have persistent migraines if they have 15 or more headache days a month, with eight of those days involving migraine headaches. A migraine typically has three phases: the time leading up to the headache, the migraine itself, and the headache following the headache. About one-third of people with migraines have an aura, a temporary set of neurological disorders linked to migraine. An aura usually occurs within one hour of the onset of a migraine. The pain can last from a few hours to a few days in the headache phase. When moving their head, affected people may also suffer brief episodes of head pain when moving their head. People with migraine, particularly women with migraine with aura, are at an elevated risk of a stroke triggered by a lack of blood flow to the brain, but this is a rare occurrence. There are several migraine disorders that usually have additional signs and symptoms. For example, familial hemiplegic migraine and sporadic hemiplegic migraine are characterized by migraine with a temporary impairment that affects one side of the body. Besides headaches, cyclic vomiting syndrome is a migraine disorder common in children and teens that causes vomiting and vomiting in addition to headaches.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/migraine


Familial hemiplegic migraine

A form of migraine headache that is common in families is a familial hemiplegic migraine. Any headache can last anywhere from a few hours to a few days. A pattern of medical signs called an aura precedes the headache in several forms of migraine, including familial hemiplegic migraine. Temporary physical signs such as blind spots, flashing lights, zig-zagging lines, and double vision are typical signs of an aura. Temporary numbness or weakness are also typical in people with familial hemiplegic migraine, auras are often characterized by temporary numbness or fatigue, often affecting one side of the body. In those people with familial hemiplegic migraine, unusually high migraine episodes have been reported. Although most people with familial hemiplegic migraine recover completely from episodes, neurological signs such as memory loss, and attention deficit can persist for weeks or months.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/familial-hemiplegic-migraine


Sporadic hemiplegic migraine

A rare occurrence of migraine headache is a speradic hemiplegic migraine. Migraines usually have intense, throbbing pain in one region of the head. Some people with migraines also experience nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound. Each headache can last from a few hours to a few days. In sporadic hemiplegic migraine and other forms of migraine, a pattern of neurological signs termed an aura appears before the headache begins. Temporary numbness or weakness are also typical in people with sporadic hemiplegic migraine, auras are often characterized by temporary numbness or paralysis, often affecting one side of the body. People with a sporadic hemiplegic migraine have unusually frequent migraine episodes. Although most people with sporadic hemiplegic migraine recover completely between episodes, cognitive problems, memory loss, and attention problems can persist for weeks or months. In certain individuals with sporadic hemiplegic migraine, Mild to severe intellectual disability has been attributed to severe cognitive impairment.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine


Cyclic vomiting syndrome

Cyclic vomiting syndrome is a condition that causes frequent bouts of nausea, vomiting, and exhaustion. An affected individual may vomit several times per hour, possibly leading to a dangerous loss of fluids. In many of the affected individuals, the signs and symptoms of each attack are very similar. Both physical excitement and infections are the most common triggers. However, many affected people experience other signs during and between episodes, including pain, lethargy, digestive disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as fainting spells. People with cyclic vomiting syndrome are also more likely than people without the condition to suffer depression, anxiety, and panic disorder. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is often thought to be a variant of migraines, which are severe headaches often associated with nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is likely to be the same as or closely related to a condition called abdominal migraine, which is characterized by attacks of stomach pain and cramping. As an affected person gets older, migraine headaches may be substituted by migraine headaches. Many people with cyclic vomiting syndrome or abdominal migraine have a family history of migraines. Most people with cyclic vomiting syndrome have normal intelligence, but some affected individuals have developmental delay or intellectual disabilities, although some sufferers have normal intelligence. Autism spectrum disorder, which affects communication and social interaction, has also been associated with cyclic vomiting syndrome. People with any of these additional features are expected to have cyclic vomiting syndrome plus.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/cyclic-vomiting-syndrome

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions