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Migraine - Crossref

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Last Updated: 22 June 2022

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A History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Associated With a a More Severe Long-term Migraine Phenotype

Background Head injury is a risk factor for persistent headaches after mild traumatic brain injury. Design/Methods From 2,161 migraine patients without a diagnosis of post-traumatic headache who participated in the American Register for Migraine Research between February 2016 and March 2020, 1,120 answered questions about a history of mTBI. Patients with mTBI had significant higher scores on the MIDAS and PHQ-2, as well as a larger number of moderate to severe GAD-7 patients with a heightened risk of mTBI. Patients with migraines and people with high risk of mTBI should be screened, and those with migraines should be aware of the potential for migraine progression and psychiatric signs after mTBI.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000801752.54157.d2


Differentiating Between Migraine and Post-traumatic Headache Using a Machine Learning Classifier

Objectivist PTH and migraine using clinical findings and MRI-based measures of brain function and functional connectivity, with the aim being to produce classification models differentiating persistent PTH and migraine. PTH and migraine are both common phenotypes. In addition, migraine is a risk factor for PTH development, often making it difficult to distinguish PTH from exacerbation of migraine symptoms. Design/Methods Thirty-four people with migraine without TBI and 48 people with mild TBI were responsible for PPTH, but no one with a history of migraine or other common tension type headache were included, but not any people with a history of migraine or an immediate tension type headache. A second regression model was custom fitted directly to the results because PCs can obscure the identification of significant variables in a model. Compared to 3/34 migraine patients, the PC-based model incorrectly classified 9/48 PPTH subjects, compared to 5/34 of migraine patients, while the non-PC classifier incorrectly classified 16/48 vs 5/34 of migraine patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000801780.76758.b7


fMRI Findings in Cortical Brain Networks Interactions in Migraine Following Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Background Reducing transcranial magnetic stimulation is one of the most non-pharmacological therapies for migraine treatment. Based on results from functional MRI results, the aim of this review is to establish the neuroimaging markers associated with rTMS therapy in patients with migraine. Also, we discovered five patients who did not have a positive response to one of the first week of therapy according to the clinical scales results, largely because of the increasing prevalence of depressive symptoms and neuroimaging criteria for depressive disorder. Conclusions - In about 70% of cases, a 5-day course of rTMS significantly improved brain networks associated with pain and antinociceptive brain structures, which may reveal the neural mechanisms responsible for migraine treatment with rTMS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2022.915346


Outcomes That Matter to Adolescents With Continuous Headache Due to Chronic Migraine and Their Parents

Background and Objectives Children and adolescents with persistent migraine who have regular headache may have elevated incidences of headache-related migraine, but they have mostly been barred from clinical trials. The aim of this study was to determine patient-valued outcome measures for headache relief among adolescents with persistent headaches as a result of chronic migraine and their parents. Methods Adolescents with an International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition diagnosis of persistent migraine, who were suffering from chronic migraines, and their parents were surveyed to ask the effectiveness of treatment results in headache frequency, severity, functional impact, and common signs. Overall, the most valuable individual outcome measure among both adolescents and parents was a decrease in the frequency of more severe headaches; however, results reflecting headache severity were the most valuable by adolescents, while outcomes reflecting functional impact were most valuable by parents. More than half of adolescents said that tracking decrease in frequency and severity of headaches in terms of severe headaches/spikes rather than total headache days was more useful. Discussion The results of this report reveal important information about which preventive treatment outcomes are coveted by adolescents with persistent migraine and their parents. More than a decrease in the frequency of headache days in general, adolescents favor a decrease in the frequency of severe headaches over a decrease in headache frequency than overall.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1212/wnl.0000000000200292


The Characteristics of White Matter Hyperintensities in Patients With Migraine

Background The presence of white matter hyperintensities in migraines is well-documented, but the location of WMH in migraine patients is insufficiently researched. This investigation assessed WMH in patients with migraine using a new Scheltens visual rating scale, a semi-quantitative scale for categorizing WMH in periventricular, lobar, basal ganglia, and infratentorial regions. Methods In this report, there were a total of 263 patients with migraine registered in the American Registry for Migraine Research from Mayo Clinic Arizona and those who undergone clinical brain magnetic resonance imaging. Results The results of the study showed that 95 patients had no WMHs on axial T2 and FLAIR imaging, and that 168 patients had WMHs. Describing the characteristics of WMHs in migraine sufferers and comparing them to WMHs attributable to other etiologies may be useful in developing classificationifiers that distinguish between migraine-specific WMH and other causes of WMH.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpain.2022.852916


Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks After Radiation Therapy Syndrome and Radiation Necrosis After Cerebral Proton Beam Radiation: A Case Report of Dual Radiotherapy Complications

Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome are a rare, delayed complication of cranial radiation therapy that involves migraine-like headaches and specialized neurologic disorders such as visual impairment, aphasia, hemiparesis, and unconsciousness. Tumor recurrence, radiation necrosis, and stroke may be misdiagnosed as SMART syndrome. Neuroimaging revealed SMART syndrome, and the patient was started on valproate. Images from the previous examination show the conclusion of gyriform contrast enhancements and persistent left temporo-occipital T2/FLAIR hyperintensity. We present a case of early SMART syndrome following proton beam radiotherapy, as well as the simultaneous occurrence of radiation necrosis and SMART syndrome in this individual. Radiation necrosis and SMART syndrome are well-defined radiotherapy issues, with the former less well understood. We address a potential shared pathophysiology involving endothelial cell dysfunction and impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation, as well as early SMART syndrome development.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/19418744221102290


Management of migraine headaches in a chronic pain patient: A case report

Abstract – Management migraines can be difficult, particularly in the geriatric and chronic pain group, where opioid-overuse headaches and opioid-induced hypertension can be difficult. This case report explores the difficulties of treating a geriatric patient with suspected chronic migraines in comparison to other pain disorders and comorbidities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.9740/mhc.2016.05.154


Dual occipital and supraorbital nerve stimulation for chronic migraine: a single-center experience, review of literature, and surgical considerations

In a few clinical trials for chronic migraine therapy, there has been no success in treating chronic migraine with the inability to demonstrate sufficient efficacy. To date, peripheral nerve stimulation for primary headache therapy is limited to off-label use only. With a combination of ONS and supraorbital nerve stimulation, the authors explore their hospital experience in CM therapy. Patients treated with dual ONS and SONS for CM were followed up with a follow-up ranging from 3 to 60 months. The mean decrease in headache-related visual analog scale score was 3. 92 –u00b1 2. 4. Half of the patients had to be symptom-free and return to normal functional capacity after. This is likely because of the fact that topographical paresthesia induced by combined ONS and SONS covers the area of migraine pain better than ONS alone.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2013.6.focus13233


Premorbid migraine history as a risk factor for vestibular and oculomotor baseline concussion assessment in pediatric athletes

OBJECTIVE Migraine history has recently been established as a risk factor for concussion and recovery. METHODS Pediatric patients with a documented history of migraine headache and matched controls without a history of migraine headache were given a baseline concussion assessment battery, which included the Vestibular/Ocular Motor Screening, near the point of convergence, and King-Devick tests. Similarities were also observed on K-D oculomotor results, with worse times in those suffering from migraine headache. Before the VOMS assessment, no differences were found on NPC distance or headache symptom reporting were reported. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric athletes with migraine headaches reported elevated baseline symptom provocation scores on the VOMS, according to CJ-Nors. On the K-D exam, Athletes with migraine headaches also performed worse, indicating the importance of premorbid migraine headaches as a risk factor in elevated concussion assessment results at baseline.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.10.peds18425


Evaluation of Efficacy, Tolerability, and Treatment Satisfaction with Almotriptan in 3 Consecutive Migraine Attacks

u2013 Satisfaction with Treatment: The aim of the open-label, multicenter Migraine study, which was published in Almogranu00ae, was to determine safety, tolerability, and satisfaction with alriptan 12. 5 mg among migraineurs who were not getting adequate results with their new acute therapy. In 33. 4% of attacks and was mild in 26. 9% at 2 h, headache pain had disappeared in 33. 4% of attacks and was mild in 26. 9% at 2 h. About 69% of patients who were highly satisfied/satisfied with alriptan therapy in general was 69%. According to the ANAES' findings, Almotriptan 12. 5 mg was safe, well-tolerated, and associated with a high rate of treatment satisfaction in patients whose previous acute migraine therapy was ineffective.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1159/000093869

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions