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Mice Gut Dysbiosis - Crossref

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Last Updated: 08 May 2022

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Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis and Altered Bile Acid Catabolism Lead to Metabolic Disorder in Psoriasis Mice

When transplanted to 2-month-old mice, we found that the dysbiotic gut microbiota of 6-month-old psoriasis-like model mice exacerbated psoriasis disease and increased metabolic abnormality. By 16S RNA gene sequencing, we discovered that the Parabacteroides distasonis mouse population decreased with age in K14-VEGF mice, and P. distasonis decreased with age in the transferred mice, with P. distasonis also decreasing in the transferred mice. Hence, we discovered that aberrant bile acid metabolism in K14-VEGF-A-transgenic mice could contribute to metabolic disease in psoriasis mice, indicating the possibility of preventing and treating the metabolic disorder in psoriasis mice by targeting gut microbial metabolites.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2022.853566


Sub-Chronic Difenoconazole Exposure Induced Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Mice

In several countries, Difenoconazole is a common triazole fungicide. DIF's harmful effects on non-target animals were shown by several previous studies, however, there are still some research into the potential risks of DIF to mammals and human health. We found that 56 days of DIF exposure reduced the colonic mucus stain's blue-periodic acid-schiff stain and the muc2 protein immunochemical stain. Following 56 days of 100 mg/kg/day DIF exposure, murin protein levels dropped dramatically in the gut of mice. The gut microbiota composition of the control group was changed significantly after 14 days of DIF exposure only decreased marginally, but the control group's mucus production was also changed dramatically. Although Akkermansia was considered as a probiotic, the phenomenon of dramatic Akkermansia rises with the decrease in gut microbiota diversity needs further investigation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10010034


Modulatory Effects of Huoxiang Zhengqi Oral Liquid on Gut Microbiome Homeostasis Based on Healthy Adults and Antibiotic-Induced Gut Microbial Dysbiosis Mice Model

Traditional herbal medicine is used around the world for its safety and effectiveness against various diseases. Huoxiang Zhengqi is a commonly used Chinese THM drug used to treat gastrointestinal disordered gastroenteritis by regulating the intestinal microbiome/immuno microenvironment. For the first time, the effects of HXZQ on healthy adults' gut microbiome were investigated, and the antibiotic-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis mice model was used for verification. HXZQ may have an anti-inflammatory effect by regulating the presence of interleukin-6 in plasma, although in mice, there were no changes in the colon tissue structure, although mouse colon tissue structure did not change. Our findings, which lead to the modulatory effects of HXZQ on gut microbial community structure, have been clarified. These findings will include new insights into THM and gut microbiome homeostasis, as well as information on the safe use of THM as a lifestyle drug for its further development.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2022.841990


Stewed Rhubarb Decoction Ameliorates Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure in Mice by Regulating Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis

This research was designed to investigate the protective role of Stewed Rhubarb decoction on chronic renal impairment by regulating gut microbiota. We discovered that SR decoction had significantly reduced the amount of urea and creatinine in plasma of CRF mice, as well as the rise of renal fibrosis and tubular atrophy, inflammation reduction, and inhibition of aquaporins damage in a CRF mouse model induced by a 0. 2% adenine diet. SR decoction failed to reduce the incidence of CRF in mice with gut microbiota depletion, further undermining the critical role of gut microbiota in SR decoction-initiated immunity against CRF. In summary, SR decoction may raise adenine-induced CRF in mice by remolding the destructed gut microbiota community's structure. Our results reveal the clinical use of SR decoction in nephropathy therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2022.842720


Hydrolyzed Bound Phenolics from Rice Bran Alleviate Hyperlipidemia and Improve Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in High-Fat-Diet Fed Mice

Rice bran free phenolics has been reported as lipid-lowering by lipid reduction, but it is unknown if rice bran bound phenolics, the phenolic profile of which differs from the free ones, has a similar effect. HBP supplementation significantly improved serum lipid profiles of high-fat-diet fed mice, according to the study. According to these results, HBP could reduce hyperlipidemia by blocking the hepatic de novolipogenesis, curbing cholesterol and fatty acid uptake in the liver and intestinal absorption in the gut.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14061277


Age-Related Intestinal Dysbiosis and Enrichment of Gut-specific Bacteria in the Lung Are Associated With Increased Susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection in Mice

We used a murine model of intranasal Streptococcus pneumoniae to investigate the effects of age on both the innate immune response and intestinal microbial populations following infection. Compared to young mice, the exacerbated pulmonary immune response was not triggered by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung, but rather an increased number of immune cell recruit chemokines by lung neutrophils. The fecal microbiome of aged and young-infected mice's fecal microbiome revealed an increase of Enterobacteriaceae in aged and young mice's feces, but not young mice, according to ageing, but not young mice. These results demonstrate that, when compared to young mice, Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in age leads to increased lung neutrophilia, as well as potentially pathogenic alterations in commensal bacteria, and suggest potential mechanistic targets related to the rise in morbidity and mortality observed in infections in age.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fragi.2022.859991


Abstract TP117: Experimental Stroke Induces Chronic Gut Dysbiosis in Male C57BL/6J Mice

Following ischemic stroke, most studies have been on acute effects of stroke on gut dysbiosis, but our research goal was to measure continuous, longitudinal changes in the gut microbiota, and intestinal pathology. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that mice with experimental ischemic stroke would have persistent gut dysbiosis and intestinal pathology at up to 35 days post-stroke relative to sham controls. Pre- and post-tMCAO's data were collected on days 0, 3, 14, and 28 to determine the long-term effects of tMCAO on gut dysbiosis, fecal boli were collected pre- and post-tMCAO. Compared to sham mice that persisted up to 28 days post-stroke, bioinformatics found significant differences in abundance among taxa at the phylum, family, and species levels in tMCAO mice's baseline samples and post-injury fecal microbiome samples in tMCAO mice. With mild-moderate epithelial hyperplasia and villous blunting, evidence of chronic intestinal inflammation was seen on day 35, with marked rises in immune cell infiltration and severe inflammation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1161/str.50.suppl_1.tp117


Long-term combined administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum TMC3115 and Lactobacillus plantarum 45 alleviates spatial memory impairment and gut dysbiosis in APP/PS1 mice

ABSTRACT This research was designed to determine the effects of Bifidobacterium bifidum TMC3115, Lactobacillus plantarum 45 and their respective use in APP/PS1 mice on cognitive development and gut microbiota. In the Morris water maze test, combined use of TMC3115 and LP45 significantly raised the times across the platform, as well as the AD, TMC3115, and LP45 groups. These results show that long-term combined administration of TMC3115 and LP45 will raise spatial memory loss in APP/PS1 mice, as well as suggesting that improving the gut microbiome may lead to potential improvements for AD patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fnaa048


48-OR: Gut Dysbiosis Promotes Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) through TLR-2 Activation by Peptidoglycan (PGN) in Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) Deficient Type 1 Diabetic (T1D) Mice

Purpose: We found that ACE2 deficiency increases the incidence of DR in Akita mice previously. Methods: Akita and ACE2-/-Akita mice were analyzed at 9 months of diabetes and the gut microbiota were investigated using 16S rRNA sequencing and metatranscriptomic analysis. Microbial load in the circulation was determined by measuring circulating PGN levels along with indicators of the gut vascular barrier. With an increase in firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the gut of ACE2-/Akita mice, a change in beta-biota was shown by 16S rRNA sequencing, revealing a change in beta diversity of the gut microbiota. In the intestine of ACE2-/-Akita mice, Loss of ACE2 improved gut barrier permeability by lowering the turnover of VE-cadherin expression. In the circulation in ACE2-/-Akita mice compared to Akita mice, increased vascular permeability was associated with barrier failure, microbial translocation, and increase PGN. Compared to Akita mice, Acellular capillaries were significantly higher in ACE2-/-Akita mice than in Akita mice.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2337/db19-48-or


Appropriate exercise level attenuates gut dysbiosis and valeric acid increase to improve neuroplasticity and cognitive function after surgery in mice

Abstract based on a single patient's year's medical findings are affected by postoperative cognitive dysfunction (APA). Here, we found that surgery caused learning and memory loss in adult mice. Transfectation of feces from surgical mice led to learning and memory loss in non-surgery mice but not from control mice. These exercise effects were also present in non-exercise mice who were ingesting feces from exercise mice. With surgery, Valeric acid aggravated neuroinflammation, learning, and memory in exercise mice. Old mice with surgery are similar to these findings from adult mice, exercise increased learning and memory loss in old mice. Older mice with feces from old exercise mice had better learning and recall than those that were confined to old mouse feces. Blood vaping acid was used during surgery, which was raised by surgery. In old surgical mice, Valeric acid blocked exercise effects on learning and memory. These findings reveal concrete evidence that gut microbiota modification contributes to POCD formation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01291-y

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

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* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions