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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus - Crossref

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Last Updated: 02 May 2022

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A Study on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Phage Types in Wound Infections and its Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern at King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, India

Scope: The present research focused on MRSA phage types and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern in wounds. In this research, 92 coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus species from various wounds were identified by inoculating on Blood agar, MacConkey agar, and Nutrient agar, which was then processed further by essential biochemical tests and tube coagulation tests. The findings revealed were MRSA of 23. 92%, Methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus, 76. 08%, and the most common phage type in MRSA and MSSA was phage III. Conclusion: Phage typing may be a very useful diagnostic tool in the future.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.20546/ijcmas.2022.1102.025


Antimicrobial resistance pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep and humans in Veterinary Hospital Maiduguri, Nigeria

Infectious S. aureus infections can cause significant health issues in the general population. Both apparently healthy and sick sheep brought to the hospital as well as medical staff and students on clinical attachment in the hospital were investigated by this research. For the isolation of MRSA, a series of 200 nasal swab samples were collected aseptically from sheep and humans. S. aureus was isolated from the samples by carefully transporting them to the laboratory, then propagated in nutrient broth at 37°C for 24 hrs, and finally subcultured in mannitol salt agar at 37°C for 24 h. MRSA was isolated using a Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute guideline and confirmed by plating onto Oxacillin Resistance Screening Agar Agar. The MRSA isolates' antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was established using the disk diffusion technique against 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents. Result: The average incidence of nasal carriage of S. aureus and MRSA was found to be 51% and 43 percent in sheep and humans, respectively. MRSA prevalence in male and female sheep was 18% and 8%, respectively, as well as 8% and 8% for male and female human samples. The MRSA isolates from sheep were 100% resistant to the same medications used for human MRSA isolates and were equally vulnerable to gentamicin, imipenem, LZD, ciprofloxacin, NOR, and ERY.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2022.1141-1148


Prevalence, Mechanism, Genetic Diversity, and Cross-Resistance Patterns of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Isolated from Companion Animal Clinical Samples Submitted to a Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in the Midwestern United States

MRS isolated from companion animal clinical trials submitted to Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory between 2012 and 2019 reveal the prevalence, species distribution, genetic diversity, resistance mechanism, and cross-resistance patterns of MRS isolated from companion animal clinical cases. Both methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius and CoNS had cross resistance to other -lactams, especially when oxacillin MIC was >4 g/mL. 11 PBP2a gene-positive, while 20 others were negative for mecA and other mec genes by PCR, according to a new review of 31 PBP2a-negative MRS isolates. Despite the fact that genotyping revealed an overall high degree of genetic variation among a subset of MRSP isolates tested, several genotypes were found from epidemiologically linked cases at the same or different time points, indicating persistence and/or nosocomial transmission.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050609


The impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neurosurgical unit: a growing problem

Patients in the neurosurgical unit between 1993 and 1999 were retrospectively diagnosed with MRSA from laboratory results. Patients with MRSA were longer in hospital stay than in any patients treated in the unit, according to the table. In 89 patients, the throat in 79, surgical wounds in 52, and multiple sites in 69 patients, methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from the nose in 89 patients, the perineum in 52, surgical wounds in 16, sputum in 16, and arterial blood samples in 16. MRSA-16 and EMRSA-15 were two common MRSA isolates, with epidemic MRSA-16 and EMRSA-15. All MRSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and teicoplanin, and there was a reduced risk of mupirocin. Patients with MRSA are discharged before eradication of infection is achieved, raising the likelihood that the disease will spread in the community.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2003.98.1.0008


Perioperative management of neurosurgical patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

The authors investigated the effects of MRSA colonization and infection in the neurosurgical population at a community-based, tertiary care referral center. The 260 patients from this group who were admitted to the intensive care unit underwent MRSA testing based on nasal swab cultures and a review of their medical history for prior MRSA infections. The authors found that among the MRSA-positive, MRSA-negative, and unscreened groups, the incidences of postoperative neurosurgical wound infections caused by all pathogens were 23. 5, 4. 1, and 1. 3%, respectively. Patients with MRSA were found to have the following clinical characteristics: male sex in 63%, a malignancy in 38 percent, diabetes in 36. 8%, an immunosuppressed state in 17. 4%, and a traumatic injury in 15. 2%. Patients receiving MRSA-specific prophylactic antibiotic therapy had a 7. 4% incidence of postoperative neurosurgical wound infection in patients receiving MRSA-specific prophylactic antibiotic therapy, relative to 32. 1% in patients receiving the standard treatment. Wound care for ICU patients was standardized for postoperative Days 0–7 with chlorhexidine cleaning at 3-day intervals. MRSA in 7 of 11 patients with prior MRSA colonization or infection was present in neurosurgical site infections. To minimize MRSA wound colonization, neurosurgical patients with MRSA colonization or a history of MRSA infections can benefit from specific perioperative care, including prophylactic antibiotics active against MRSA and postoperative wound care with coatings and chlorhexidine antisepsis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2009.5.jns081589


Successful treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus meningitis using linezolid without removal of intrathecal infusion pump

Staphylococcus aureus meningitis in a patient with such a pump was successfully treated with linezolid without the need for removal of the intrathecal pump. The implantation of an intrathecal pump system for baclofen administration by a 77-year-old woman with cervical myelopathy was carried out. When a combined intravenous antibiotic therapy regimen of vancomycin and rifampicin resulted in no clinical improvement, the therapy was stopped, and linezolid was administered intravenously as monotherapy. Following 1 week of linezolid therapy, blood and CSF cultures were sterile. Following the patient's treatment with oral linezolid for 3 months, Intravenous therapy was continued for a total of 3 weeks. These results support previous studies' findings of the safety of linezolid for the treatment of severe infections of the central nervous system caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, particularly postneurosurgical infections.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns-07/09/0651


Recent Developments in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Treatment: A Review

Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause life-threatening diseases and some minor infections in living organisms, is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause life-threatening infections and some minor infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a superbug that has emerged as a result of its defiant action against the antibiotics and medications most commonly used to treat major and minor infections, is a microbug. This paper explores the clinical management of MRSA pathogenesis, recent advances in rapid diagnosis, and MRSA antimicrobial treatment options for MRSA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050606


Metal nanoparticles functionalized with nutraceutical Kaempferitrin from edible Crotalaria juncea, exert potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

For the first time, C. juncea extract and kaempferitrin were used to create silver and copper nanoparticles. Cu after prolonged treatment with KF@CuNPs in the presence of MRSA was determined by an Alizarin red test, indicating that the CuNPs' antibacterial activity is initiated by the CuNPs itself. Both the NPs had similar kill kinetics to reduce the pathogen and imaging with Crystal violet assay, Fluorescent live dead imaging and SEM analysis revealed a 60 percent decrease in biofilm formation at KF@AgNPs and KF@CuNPs with time murder curves. For KF@AgNPs and > two fold for KF@CuNPs, the colony count from the in vivo infection zebrafish model in the treatment group decreased by 1. 8 fold and more than two fold. When treated with KF@AgNPs and were almost identical to the normal liver, no significant cytological shifts were apparent in these liver morphology images.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-11004-2


Lemierre Syndrome Complicating Deep Neck Infection and Descending Mediastinitis Secondary to Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection

Lemierre syndrome is an oropharyngeal disease, thrombosis of the internal jugular vein, and subsequent hematogenic metastasis via septic emboli. In a 5-month-old Saudi boy, we report a case of Lemierre syndrome complicated by falling necrotizing mediastinitis as a result of a Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Pak J Med Sci, a pharmaceutical company, Pak J Med Sci.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.12669/pjms.38.5.5442


The Host CYP1A1-Microbiota Metabolic Axis Promotes Gut Barrier Disruption in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Abdominal Sepsis

BACKGROUNDING of the intestinal barrier function has been implicated in multiple host metabolic pathway pathways axes that regulate intestinal barrier function. Mice lacking CYP1A1 altered gut microbiome, a decreased metabolic shift from lysine to cadaverine in the caecal contents and antimicrobial molecule manufacturing, and were shielded from gut barrier disruption when exposed to MRSA challenge. After MRSA infection, antibiotic-driven gut dysbacteriosis inhibited the survival and disrupted the intestinal barrier integrity in CYP1A1 KO mice. In addition, increased cadaverine levels in feces and serum were found in critically ill patients with gut leakage as a result of persistent MRSA infection, but cadaverine was not present in healthy controls. Conclusion This research showed that host CYP1A1 plays unexpected role in microbiota-mediated cadaverine metabolism, with potentially affecting dysbacteriosis as a result of MRSA-induced abdominal sepsis, as well as other surgical targets against abdominal sepsis, showing that inhibiting CYP1A1 or blocking cadaverine-histamine H4 receptor signaling could be a potential therapeutic target against abdominal sepsis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2022.802409

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions