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Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 02 May 2022

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Suppression of Thiol-Dependent Antioxidant System and Stress Response in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Docosanol: Explication Through Proteome Investigation

The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of docosanol on the protein expression profile of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 947 protein spots were found in both control and docosanol-treated samples, with four out of 40 spots being significantly restricted with a fold change greater than 1. 0. Proportionally, the thiol-dependent antioxidant system and stress response proteins are downregulated in MRSA, which are crucial for survival in the face of oxidative stress. These results show that docosanol may be able to effectively target the antioxidant pathway by lowering the production of bacillithiol and stress-associated proteins.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12033-021-00434-4


Metal nanoparticles functionalized with nutraceutical Kaempferitrin from edible Crotalaria juncea, exert potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

For the first time, optimization of silver and copper nanoparticle formation using C. juncea extract and kaempferitrin was attempted. The effectiveness of KF@AgNPs and KF@CuNPs against biofilm formation and planktonic growth on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus autus has been investigated, as well as potential mechanisms. Cucucu pneumonia-induced antibacterial activity is initiated by the CuNPs itself, according to the Alizarin red test. Both the NPs had similar kill kinetics to minimize the pathogen and imaging with Crystal violet assay, fluorescent live dead imaging and SEM analysis revealed a 60% decrease in biofilm production at KF@AgNPs and KF@CuNPs, according to a 60% decrease in biofilm formation at a Sub-MIC level of KF@AgNPs and KF@CuNPs. For KF@AgNPs and > two fold for KF@CuNPs, the colony count from the in vivo infection zebrafish model in the treatment group decreased by more than 1. 8 fold for KF@AgNPs and > twofold for KF@CuNPs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-11004-2


Everybody nose: molecular and clinical characteristics of nasal colonization during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

To assess the host population and identify concomitant nasal colonization, we offer a new series of colonizing isolates from methicillin-resistant S. aureus bloodstream infections, as well as the clinical characteristics of concomitant nasal colonization. MRSA growth was based on a single colony culture from the blood and an average of 6 colonies from the nares. MRSA bloodstream infection was confirmed in 68 patients, 53 of whom were swabbed, and 37 were colonized with MRSA in the anterior nares, with 53 being colonized with MRSA. In the nares, 11% of patients had more than one clone of MRSA. Conclusions The molecular epidemiological landscape of colonization in the area of invasive disease is varied, and understanding the role between colonization and invasive disease is key to combating invasive MRSA disease.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-022-07371-w


Inhibition of Berberine on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

This review investigated the effect and potential mechanism of berberine on biofilm formation by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The minimum inhibition concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration for berberine were 0. 05 mg/ml and 0. 1 mg/ml, respectively, with chloramphenicol and a significantly higher inhibitory effect on the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, berberine greatly promoted biofilm production and reduced biofilm thickness in a dose-dependent manner. berberine has been shown to be a potent quorum sensing agent against biofilm-associated infections in these studies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s43450-022-00242-0


Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis in a 16-month-old boy: a case report

Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis, a rare condition that usually affects immunocompromised adults. Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive Clostridiodes difficile, or viruses account for the majority of cases of pediatric enterocolitis. This is the first published case report of a child with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis. Case description The 16-month-old non-Hispanic White boy with no previous medical or psychosocial history was first admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain and emesis. The patient's symptoms returned the next day, and a repeat contrast enema showed no signs of recurrent intussus. An anastomotic leak on hospital day 6 delayed his postoperative recovery and the creation of an end ileostomy with mucous fistula. The patient experienced a dramatic rise in ileostomy production on postoperative day 12, and stool cultures were established. Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter species, and Clostridiodes difficile were all negative three days later, but not positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was on a 10-day course of oral vancomycin and then discharged home in good health four days later. Staphylococcus aureolitis enterocolitis, a methicillin-resistant infant, was released in this first published study. Staphylococcus aureus enterolitis, a methicillin-resistant disease, is rare and has overlapping signs with more common gastrointestinal pathologies, so it is often misdiagnosed. When a patient presents diarrhea or high ostomy results in association with fecal cultures that are incompatible with Clostridiodes difficile and other common pathogenic agents, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be considered.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-022-03381-z


Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Mercaptophenol Functionalized-Gold Nanorods Against a Clinical Isolate of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

AuNRs with a marginally changed longitudinal peak were found in a typical UV–vis spectrum of AuNRs. In addition, 4-MPH-AuNRs demonstrated a similar Fourier-Transformed Infrared spectrum to 4-MPH and a loss of the thiol band, indicating a continued functionalization by thiol-gold binding, indicating a successful functionalization. The results reveal that 4-MPH-AuNRs have a minimum inhibitory concentration of 6. 25 g/mL against a planktonic suspension of MRSA. In addition, 4-MPH-AuNRs resulted in a 1. 8–2. 9 log-cycle decrease in MRSA biofilm viable count down to a concentration range of 100–6. 0 g/mL. The surface-modified nanorods were found within the bacterial cells after 6 hours of exposure, demonstrating that the nanorods were internalized into the bacterial cells by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed that the nanorods were internalized into the bacterial cells. Thus, 4-MPH-AuNRs can be used as a potential antibacterial agent, particularly against MRSA strain biofilms.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10904-022-02294-0

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions