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Methane Oxidation - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 03 May 2022

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Denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation and its applications for wastewater treatment

Although wastewater treatment plants help reduce the contamination load that reaches water bodies, wastewater treatment plants also causes water bodies, their operation has drawbacks, including a lack of nitrogen remotion and greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, in recent years, more effective wastewater treatment techniques have been adopted. This article addresses two primary topics that have been discussed above, as DAMO microorganisms use methane, a readily available gas in WWTP, as a carbon source to reduce nitrite and/or nitrate to dinitrogen gas. Their presence in various anoxic environments, their ability to remove nitrogen and oxidize methane, and their ability to establish partnerships with others are all causing the versatility of DAMO microorganisms. This paper provides a summary of the DAMO process, the microorganisms involved in it, and their metabolic pathways, as well as their connection with other biomass, emphasizing the main determining factors that enable wastewater treatment development of an active DAMO biomass.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13762-022-04155-2


Methane oxidation in a landfill biowindow under wide seasonally fluctuating climatic conditions

Methane oxidation in the biowindow led to some unexpected findings, including a thick, solid winter frost coat affecting gas exchange in winter and temperatures above 45 °C in the biowindow in late summer. However, CH_4's oxidation rate was mostly oxidized at top layers, with CH_4 being mostly oxidized at top layers, with CH_4 suffering significant variations in the temperature and moisture content of the compost layer in addition to influx fluctuations affecting CH_4's oxidation rates; however, a high average CH_4 oxidation rate of 237 g. m. 2d1 being obtained. In the entire period of the investigation, which is within the range of the highest reported maximum CH_4 oxidation rates, the compost mixture's methanotrophic potential of the compost mixture reached an average value of 282 mol. g. 1. d1 in the soil mixture, which is within the range of the highest reported maximum CH_4 oxidation rates. If the MC was above 30%, the adopted compost mixture was suitable for CH_4 oxidation. The influence of MC variations on CH_4's oxidation rate was dependent on the temperature range within the biowindow's range.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-17566-4


NO_3^− is an important driver of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria and CH_4 fluxes in the reservoir riparian zone

An important biological process that incorporates microbial nitrogen and carbon cycling and is largely carried out by nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria. Using correlation analysis and redundancy analysis, we investigated environmental factors that influenced CH_4 fluxes and N-DAMO bacterial variations, as well as N-DAMO bacterial variations. The increase in NO_3 caused structural changes in the composition of the N-DAMO bacterial population, increasing its number, facilitating the oxidation of CH_4 and reduced CH_4 emissions from the riparian zone, under the influence of three distinct land use styles.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-16914-8


Active anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfur disproportionation in the deep terrestrial subsurface

Microbial life is widespread in the terrestrial subsurface and showdown to several kilometers deep, but the energy sources that fuel metabolism in deep oligotrophic and anoxic environments remain unclear. A terrestrial sulfate-methane transition zone is created by the deep crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield in Olkiluoto, Finland, where discontinuing gradients of abiotic methane and ancient seawater-derived sulfate create a terrestrial sulfate transition zone. For the first time, we provided concrete evidence of methane degradation in a deep terrestrial bedrock using chemical and isotopic data coupled to genome-resolved metaproteogenomics. Zerovalent sulfur in the groundwater can result from abiotic rock reactions or a non-obligate syntrophy with Methanoperedens, possibly linking methane and sulfur cycles in Olkiluoto groundwater, resulting in methane and sulfur cycles. Our findings reveal that AOM and sulfur disproportionation as active metabolisms as well as evidence of methane and sulfur fuel microbial presence in the deep terrestrial subsurface.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-022-01207-w

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions