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Metatarsalgia - Crossref

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Last Updated: 23 April 2022

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Description of Total Population Hospital Admissions for Morton's Metatarsalgia in Australia

Morton's metatarsalgia is a painful perineural fibroma of a plantar nerve, and it occurs in the second or third intermetatarsal spaces of the forefoot. The aim of this investigation was to look at hospital admissions with a diagnosis of Morton's metatarsalgia in the Australian population from 1998 to 2008. Methods The information regarding admissions with a diagnosis code of ICD-10 G57. 6 was extracted from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's hospital morbidity databases of hospital morbidity from 1998 to 2008. Morton's metatarsalgia admissions were almost threefold higher for women in the population compared to men. The highest incidence was among women admitted to Morton's metatarsalgia in the 50- to 54-year-old age group; among males, the highest rate was in the slightly older 55- to 59-year-old age group; among women aged 50 to 54 years old age group. Conclusions According to statistics from Morton's metatarsalgia, women's admissions were three times higher than men.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7547/0003-0538-104.5.451


419 Medium- Long Term Clinical Outcome of Distal Metaphyseal Metatarsal Osteotomy (DMMO) for Lesser Toe Metatarsalgia

Abstract Aim The surgical treatment of metatarsalgia is often carried out by an intra-articular Weil's type of metatarsal osteotomy. Minimally invasive surgery has become increasingly popular for a variety of forefoot conditions. A distal metaphyseal osteotomy to decompress the affected ray may result in significant improvements to quality of life. The purpose of this research was to determine the outcomes of patients after minimally invasive distal metaphyseal osteotomy surgery. Methods This is a single-centre, in a string of 12 patients who underwent DMMO. Conclusions DMMO is a safe and effective tool for the treatment of metatarsalgia with low complication rates, as shown by the reduced MOXFQ score after a minimum of 12 months was statistically significant. Following surgery, we discovered that clinical improvement of patient's symptoms may take up to 12 months and beyond.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjs/znac039.285


Jones Transfer to the Lesser Rays in Metatarsalgia: Technique and Long-Term Follow-Up

Since Jones' transfer to the lower rays to review the long-term results and the indications for these procedures, thirty-three feet in 29 patients with metatarsalgia were investigated. Patients with symptoms of metatarsalgia, posterior to anterior pes cavus deformity, and patients with mild or severe spreadfoot deformity with the fall of the central metatarsals were performed. Patients with metatarsalgia are expected to have a more effective treatment than those with pes cavus deformity, as well as patients with clawing and metatarsalgia secondary to excessively long toes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/107110079401501001


Metatarsal Osteotomy for Primary Metatarsalgia: Radiographic and Pedobarographic Study

The effect of surgical intervention for primary metatarsalgia on the load distribution and bony architecture of the forefoot is unclear. In three of four patients with a height rise of more than 4. 5 mm, transfer lesions were present. Changes in the height of the metatarsal or the pressure under it can alter the signs of metatarsalgia. It is not possible to predict the surgical elevation of the metatarsal head, but it is not possible to predict the symptoms.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/107110078900900502


The efficacy of chiropractic adjustment in the treatment of primary metatarsalgia

In terms of subjective and objective scientific findings in the treatment of primary metatarsalgia, the goal of this investigation was to investigate the relative effectiveness of foot and ankle modifications as opposed to placebo ultrasound. Foot and ankle adjustments were made, and Group A underwent surgery, while Group B received detuned ultrasound as the placebo therapy. Each group was randomly assigned to their respective groups of twenty participants aged 20 to 78 years. Foot and ankle exercises were not believed to be safe in the treatment of primary metatarsalgia. In the research, only subjects with primary metatarsalgia were included. The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Numerical Pain Rating Scale -101, and the Foot Function Index were among the subjective results collected. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney unpaired U-test for the categorical variables and the parametric two-sample unpaired t-test for the continuous variables were used to make group comparisons.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.51415/10321/2196


Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Recalcitrant Metatarsalgia

Metatarsalgia is characterized by pain in the forefoot, which is often associated with increased anxiety about the metatarsal head region. Pulsed radiofrequency therapy can provide pain relief to patients with a variety of chronic diseases without triggering neural injury. Studies have reported that ultrasound-guided PRF may be useful for adhesive capsulitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, and recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. We present a case of remarkable pain relief after using ultrasound-guided PRF targeting the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle of a 67-year-old woman with recalcitrant metatarsalgia. The patient complained reduced pain and did not have any particular side effects 10 minutes after ultrasound-guided PRF was administered at the PTN. We present the first case report using ultrasound-guided PRF at the PTN for treatment of recalcitrant metatarsalgia. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case report using ultrasound-guided PRF at the PTN.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7547/17-147


Influence of Foot Type on the Clinical Outcome of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Metatarsalgia. A Prospective Pilot Study

Setting and goals: Surgical intervention for central metatarsalgia are designed to harmonize the metatarsal bola with osteotomies that can be performed by minimally invasive techniques. However, the possible association between the foot type and the mid-term postoperative outcome is unclear. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to determine if the foot type conditions affected the postoperative mid-term functional outcome. Methods: A series of 28 patients were treated for primary central metatarsalgia by a minimally invasive distal metaphyseal osteotomy. In these overall figures, there were no differences either by sex or by foot type, though there was only a marginal difference in interphalangeal mobility in the supinated feet at 6-month follow-ups relative to other foot types. Conclusion: Hence, DMMO provides the most effective medical and functional result for the surgical treatment of metatarsalgia, regardless of the patient's foot position.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2021.748330


Correlations between subjective treatment responses and plantar pressure parameters of metatarsal pad treatment in metatarsalgia patients: a prospective study

Plantar pressure testing could be a way to more accurately measure pressure loading under the MH. This research aims to investigate the correlations between subjective pain improvement and success rate, as well as the plantar pressure parameters in metatarsalgia patients treated using MPs. Pain scores were obtained from all subjects before and after 2 weeks of MP therapy. Before and after treatment, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the difference between the plantar pressure values and VAS scores. The maximal peak pressure and pressure-time integral under the second MH's second MH was reduced, as well as statistically improved subjective pain scores, which also raised subjective pain scores. Conclusion After a successful decline in the PTI and MPP under the second MH, we found that subjective pain relief was linked to subjective pain reduction.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-7-95


The intermetatarsophalangeal bursa--its significance in Morton's metatarsalgia

Patients with classical Morton's metatarsalgia have lymphocytic infiltration, with more fibrinoid necrosis of the bursal wall. In the most lateral web space, the bursa extends beyond the ligament and is not in touch with the neurovascular bundle, which may explain the rarity of symptoms in this region.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1302/0301-620x.62b2.7364832

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions