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Metatarsal - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 23 April 2022

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Avoiding Fifth Metatarsal Intramedullary Screw Head Cuboid Impingement: A Weightbearing Computed Tomography Anatomic Study.

Using weightbearing computed tomography results, we created a new MT intramedullary screw trajectory model. Methods For 20 weightbearing foot computed tomographs, an automated system was used to simulate fifth MT screw fixation in the ideal course down the shaft and with a 7-mm screw head. In three dimensions, the closest distance from the simulated ideal trajectory to the cuboid was measured. A simulated screw head was then developed from the proximal tip of the metatarsal distally into the metatarsal, until it was almost out of sight of the cuboid. Conclusion The most effective guidewire placement for the fifth MT intramoment fixation is straight against the cuboid. If the screw is not countersunk, approximately 85% of patients would have cuboid impingement. The oblique fluoroscopic view of the foot gives a reliable indication of screw head impingement on the cuboid.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35403463


More than 20 years' follow-up of metatarsal neck shortening oblique osteotomy for rheumatoid forefoot deformity.

However, a significant number of patients with forefoot deformity remain forefoot deformity. Patients with RA have a oblique osteotomy for forefoot deformity in patients with RA. The aim of this research was to analyze the findings of more than 20 years' follow-up of metatarsal neck shortening oblique osteotomy for forefoot deformity in patients with RA. At the last follow-up with mild pain that caused no footwear issues, the presence of painful callosities in the surgically treated feet without revised surgery decreased from 32 feet to 4 feet. In two patients, Re-osteotomy at the metatarsal of the lessor toe was performed on four feet. The mean total Japanese Society for Surgery for the Foot RA foot and ankle score was 64. 0/100, and the emotional analogue scale of overall satisfaction was 62. Conclusions Metatarsal neck SOO appeared to be able to treat patients with RA.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35396140


Metatarsal Head Resection: Patient Reported Outcomes in Patients Suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common autoimmune disease disorders encountered in a clinical setting, according to Lesser Toes. The procedure of choice is Metatarsal head resection of the lower toes with or without first MTP arthrodesis. The intention of this investigation was to address metatarsal head resection for the care of patients with RA and the effectant patient-reported outcomes. Methods: A retrospective review of patients who underwent metatarsal head resection at our hospital from 2010 to 2020 was carried out. Foot Function Index scores as well as the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement System survey were used to measure outcomes. Review: 45 patients fulfilled the requirements for this study, out of a total of 24 people who completed both the FFI and PROMIS score surveys, including 45 patients. When compared to preoperative pain of 4. 2 to 2. 2, there was a substantial decline in postoperative pain scores. 2 patients suffered with wound wounds, 11 patients underwent hammertoe therapy, and 20 patients had simultaneous 1st MTP arthrodesis. Conclusion: Preliminary findings indicate that metatarsal head resection in patients with RA may be helpful in reducing pain and may lead to long-term patient satisfaction. PROMIS scores were very helpful in determining that patients were not functioning properly at the same rate as the average person in all aspects. We want to increase the impact of our research for a more comprehensive inquiry as well as perform a more extensive statistical analysis to gain more insight into patient-related causes and their effects on outcomes.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/PMC8998405


Side-to-Side Difference of Metatarsal Rotation in Normal Individuals.

Background (output: The first metatarsal pronation angle is estimated at 16 degrees in a previous report, with the normal angle at 18 degrees. In a population of 63 healthy, asymptomatic individuals, Paired t tests were used to determine the severity of mean side-to-side differences. The first metatarsal pronation difference was 4. 3 degrees for MPA and 4. 9 degrees for angle, according to the authors. Conclusions The mean difference in first metatarsal pronation between the two groups was about 4 to 5 degrees, according to MPA and a grading system.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35357250

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions