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Metatarsal - Crossref

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Last Updated: 23 April 2022

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Workflow assessing the effect of Achilles tendon rupture on gait function and metatarsal stress: Combined musculoskeletal modeling and finite element analysis

The incidence of Achilles tendon rupture among badminton players has escalated in recent years. The aim of the current study is to develop a method that may help increase the prediction of ATR clinical and rehabilitation applications based on the finite element model derived foot internal stress prediction. The surgically repaired Achilles tendon had a longer length of 12. 5% than the uninjured tendon. According to the injured side, the ankle plantarflexion angle and AT force decreased by 39. 6% and 21. 9% at the 80 percent point of stance phase. The strain on the fourth and fifth metatarsals was increased by 59. 5 percent and 85. 9% on the injured side. The reduced ankle plantar flexor force could be harmed by triceps surae muscle atrophy and reduced force transmission ability of elongated AT. The increased von Mises' pressure on fourth and fifth metatarsals, as well as greater foot inversion, may elevate the ankle lateral sprain injury risk.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/09544119221085795


Average 4-Year Outcomes of Distal Oblique First Metatarsal Osteotomy for Stage 1 to 3 Hallux Rigidus

Degenerative metatarsophalangeal joint disease treatment with surgical intervention are either joint destructive or conservative procedures. The hypothesis was that an oblique distal shortening osteotomy of the first metatarsal bone osteotomy is a safe conservative strategy for the administration of stage 1 to 3 hallux rigidus. The cohort included 72 people with an average age of 57 years; 22 of 87 feet undergone first metatarsal surgery in isolation; 65 percent of 87 of 87 patients had concomitant forefoot surgery; 32 of 87 had Moberg phalangeal osteotomies; and 34 of 87 with Moberg phalangeal osteotomies. 15 patients had transfer metatarsalgia compared to five at the last follow-up, without needing another surgical procedure. Conclusion: Oblique distal osteotomy of stage 1-3 hallux rigidus, often in conjunction with other first ray procedures, did well during our follow-up time period, with a high subjective satisfaction rate and no complications.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/10711007211052298


Distal Metatarsal Articular Angle in Hallux Valgus Deformity. Fact or Fiction? A 3-Dimensional Weightbearing CT Assessment

The first metatarsal bone deformity of the distal articular surface of the first metatarsal in hallux valgus was previously described as an increase in valgus deformity. Our study was designed to assess the DMAA in HV and control populations, before and after computer correction of M1 pronation and plantarflexion with special weightbearing CT software. XR-DMAA and the 3d-DMAA obtained significantly higher mean values in the HV group in comparison to controls. The measure DMAA results showed no significant difference between a small subset of precorrected juvenile HV and non-juvenile HV. Conclusion: Although the deformity of M1 distal articular surface in HV is overestimated on conventional radiographs, comparing to controls showed that an 8. 6 degrees increase remained after confounding factors' correction, the change was not significant. Clinical implication: An increase in the valgus of M1 distal articular surface in HV after pronation computerized correction was still present in compared to controls.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/10711007211051642


Avoiding Fifth Metatarsal Intramedullary Screw Head Cuboid Impingement: A Weightbearing Computed Tomography Anatomic Study

The cuboid's physiologic arrangement is shown by several case reports of fifth metatarsal intramedullary fixation fixation. Using weightbearing computed tomography results, we developed a fifth MT intramedullary screw trajectory model. Methods: An automated tool was used to simulate fifth MT screw fixation in the ideal trajectory down the shaft and with a 7-mm screw head, allowing for cuboid impingement with simulated intramonial screw position. In 3 dimensions, a virtual screw head was then developed from the proximal tip of the metatarsal distally to the metatarsal until it was largely avoiding the cuboid. About 95% of patients will have cuboid impingement if the screw is not countersunk. The foot oblique fluoroscopic view provides a reliable indication of screw head impingement on the cuboid.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/10711007221084624


Validation of the Talar–Second Metatarsal Angle as a Standard Measurement for Radiographic Evaluation

The foot's normal versus pathologic alignment of the foot can be used to establish a relationship between the forefoot and the hindfoot, which will provide valuable information about the foot's physiological versus pathological alignment of the foot. The talar-first metatarsal angle is often used as one of these angles in this capacity, but there are limitations to the anteroposterior T1M angle. We present a more reliable, reproducible, and accurate method for determining foot abnormalities in the transverse plane using the T2M angle rather than the T1M angle. Photographs were taken in the angle and base of gait, the neutral calcaneal stance position, and the resting calcaneal stance position. Results: In NCSP, the mean SD T2M angle was 2. 95° 7. 16°, and 8. 21° 7. 21° in RCSP. The intraclass correlation coefficients in the studies were 0. 905 in NCSP and 0. 937 in RCSP.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7547/1010475


Surgical Treatment of Diaphyseal Stress Fractures of the Fifth Metatarsal in Competitive Athletes

Methods: Twenty top-level athletes with diaphyseal stress fractures fixed with intramedullary malleolar screws were analyzed. With a computerized pedobarograph, Static and dynamic maximum vertical force and peak plantar tensions were analyzed. Twelve athletes returned to a higher level of fitness, 7 to the same level, and 1 to a lower level relative to the beginning of injury. The midfoot average of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society was 93. 8. During the computerized pedobarographic examinations, 18 patients were diagnosed with varus of the metatarsus and the midfoot, and two others were identified with normal plantigrade foot. Conclusions: Intramedullary malleolar screws can provide prompt and effective relief of fifth metatarsal stress fractures in athletes. Varus of the metatarsus and the midfoot were among the stress fractures in this group of competitive athletes, and all athletes were advised to wear orthoses until their competitive careers were complete.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7547/1010517


Side-to-Side Difference of Metatarsal Rotation in Normal Individuals

Background: A previous research found the first metatarsal pronation angle at 16 degrees and a normal angle at 18 degrees. The primary aim of this study was to determine how foot in normal people differed from side to side. Results: The mean side-to-side difference in first metatarsal pronation was 4. 3 degrees for MPA and 4. 9 degrees for a angle. Conclusion: The mean difference in first metatarsal pronation between both sides of the cohort of normal patients was from 4 to 5 degrees based on MPA and angle.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/10711007221079610


Pseudoaneurysm of the Dorsalis Pedis Artery Following Open Reduction Internal Fixation of a Second Metatarsal Fracture: A Case Study

Pseudoaneurysms are caused by an artery's traumatic or iatrogenic process, resulting in the accumulation of blood between the two outermost layers of a blood vessel, tunica media, and tunica adventitia. Pedal artery pseudoaneurysms are a rare complication of foot and ankle surgery, and, thus, no cases have been reported in the literature. A pseudoaneurysm of the dorsalis pedis artery that developed shorty after ORIF's second metatarsal fracture, according to our case study.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7547/20-201


Orthosis and Foot Structure Affect the Fifth Metatarsal Principal Strains During Simulated Level Walking

For certain individuals, structural features of the foot may raise fracture risk, undermining the need for intervention techniques to prevent fracture. Although orthotic devices have demonstrated promise in reducing fractures of the fifth metatarsal bone, the effect of orthosis on fifth metatarsal strains is not well understood. During cadaveric simulations of level walking, the aim was to quantify the effects of various foot orthotic devices on principal tensile strains in the proximal fifth metatarsal bone. During level walking, an additional aim was to investigate the relationship between foot structural characteristics and related strains on the fifth metatarsal bone. Methods: A total of ten midtibial cadaveric specimens were attached to a 6 degrees of freedom robotic gait simulator. The peak tensile strains were measured and reported in relation to each orthotic disorder and orthotic-specific association of both zones' functional features and principal strains. Results: 2 of the 11 orthotic conditions significantly reduced strain in zone II as compared to the sneaker-only condition. The Meary's angle increased when walking in the sneaker-only condition showed a strong correlation with the Meary's angle. In zone II and zone III, the use of orthotic devices eased principal strain relative to the condition of a sneaker without an orthosis. Clinical Importance: Clinicians can use foot archeology to determine the correct foot orthosis to potentially minimize stress fracture risk in high-risk populations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/03635465221079652

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions