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Metastatic Nonseminomatous Germ Cell - Crossref

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Last Updated: 27 January 2022

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Clinical outcome of robot-assisted residual mass resection in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumor

Abstract Purpose: Abstract Purpose The results of robot-assisted residual mass resection in nonseminomatous germ cell tumor patients with residual tumors following chemotherapy will be investigated. Patients with NSGCT undergoing RA-RMR at two tertiary referral centers between January 2007 and April 2019. Patients and methods Retrospective medical chart review of all patients with NSGCT undergoing RA-RMR at two tertiary referral centers between January 2007 and April 2019. Patients were not eligible for RA-RMR in the case of a residual tumor involving 10 to 50 mm at cross-sectional computed tomography imaging, ventrably or laterally from the aorta or vena cava, with standardized tumor markers after completion of chemotherapy and no history of retroperitoneal surgery. In 13 patients, the Royal Marsden stage before chemotherapy was IIA in 13, IIB in 16, IIC in 3 and IV in 13 patients, despite chemotherapy being IA in 13. The median residual tumor size was 1. 9 cm. One patient relapsed in the retroperitoneum after a median follow-up of 41 months.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00345-020-03437-z


Predicting Outcomes in Men With Metastatic Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumors (NSGCT): Results From the IGCCCG Update Consortium

PURPOSE The International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group's classification plays a vital role in the diagnosis of metastatic germ cell tumors in the treatment of metastatic germ cell tumors, but the group's research is based on patient samples from 1975 to 1990. METHODS DATA on 9,728 men with metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumor tumors treated with cisplatin- and etoposide-based first-line chemotherapy between 1990 and 2013 were collected by 30 institutes or collaborative groups in Europe, North America, and Australia. Results & Results A 5-year PFS remained unchanged in patients with good prognosis, with 89% versus 90 percent, respectively, but the 5-year OS increased from 92% to 96%, compared to the original IGCCCG study. PFS remained stable with 75% versus 78% in patients with intermediate prognosis, with 75% compared to 78%, and the OS increased from 89% to 89%. CONCLUSION The IGCCCG Update model improves individual prognostication in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumors, according to CONCLUSION.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.20.03296


Individualized intensification of treatment based on tumor marker decline in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT): A report from the Swedish Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group, SWENOTECA

515 History: In a population-based multicenter SWENOTECA protocol with stringent guidelines for diagnosis, and follow-up, 602 adult patients from Sweden and Norway with metastatic testicular NSGCT were included from July 1995 to December 2003, 602 adult patients from Sweden and Norway with metastatic testicular NSGCT were included, with stringent guidelines for staging, diagnosis, and follow-up. Patients with positive response continued to be administered with BEP, but patients with unsatisfactory t1/2 underwent treatment in two steps with the addition of ifosfamide in step 1. Those with metastatic testicular NSGCT in the population had 99 percent of all patients had been included in the study, with 99, 7% of all patients with metastatic testicular NSGCT in the population. According to intensification step 2 and intensity, 75% of the patients were treated with BEP, median 4 courses, without intensification, 19% according to intensification step 1, and 6% according to intensification step 2. There was no significant difference in PFS between the good and intermediate risk group. Conclusions: Our findings, which were based on population-based patient data and targeted therapy based on tumor marker decline, are highly encouraging in all risk groups, but especially in the intermediate risk group.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2009.27.15_suppl.5015


On the necessity for postchemotherapy surgery for residual abdominal masses in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT) of testis

5888 Background: Reactive abdominal masses after chemotherapy for metastatic NSGCT of testis may have viable tumor-derived tissue, which can be a nidus for relapse of disease, particularly when the tissue is clearly malignant. This supports the use of routine retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in large masses where malignant tissue is present at an acceptable rate. Methods: 51 patients were enrolled from the MRC study of 3 vs. 4 cycles of BEP for good prognosis metastatic NSGCT, residual abdominal mass only, unresected post-chemotherapy, and response evaluation: CR or PR marker ve. Of the 41 patients who did not have surgery, 37 were considered on subsequent CTs to have normal appearances without further intervention. Conclusions: For patients with small residual masses in stable prognosis metastatic disease with poor prognosis metastatic disease, no short or medium-term benefit from routine surgery would have been apparent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2009.27.15_suppl.5088


Importance of maintenance of dose intensity (DI) during induction chemotherapy (iCT) for metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT)

e16063 Introduction: Background: The majority of patients with metastatic germ cell tumors can be treated by ciplatin- and etoposide-based CT. On metastatic NSGCT, we analyzed the role of DI of iCT in the retrospective analysis. We compared results from all pts who relapsed after iCT with those from 159 randomly sampled pts without relapses. All pts were given classical E 500 P or BE 500 P regiments during iCT. In each IGCCCG prognostic group, a multivariate Cox stepwise regression analysis was carried out to establish independent prognostic variables. Results: Multivariate analysis showed the following negative prognostic factors as independent in the IGCCCG's positive prognostic group: retroperitoneal lymph nodes > 5 cm. Conclusions: One of the key factors for pts success in intermediate and poor IGCCCG prognostic groups is maintaining a DI greater than 80% during iCT, for the treatment metastatic NSGCT.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2009.27.15_suppl.e16063


Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Testicular Tumour With Metastatic Retroperitoneal Lymphadenopathy Presenting As Severe Backache Due To Ivc Thrombosis

Malignancy can cause acute IVC thrombosis thanks to its prothrombotic ability. Malignant tumors can compress, adhere or infiltrate the IVC wall, resulting in endothelial damage with subsequent thrombosis. Metastatic retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy as a result of testicular cancer is a rare cause of IVC thrombosis with resultant IVC thrombosis that does not appear as backache. In cases of IVC thrombosis, a high index of suspicion is required to find primary testicular tumor in infants. In an aortocaval region compressing IVC, a MRI Lumbosacral spine done outside revealed a soft tissue signal strength retroperitoneal mass in a sacral spine. The diffusion of retroperitoneal mass and the IVC tumor thrombus were found on DW-MRI. On histopathology results, the possibility of primary testicular lymphadenopathy leading to IVC invasion was considered by the possibility of primary testicular lymphadenopathy with metastatic retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, which led to IVC invasion with resultant thrombosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.24018/ejmed.2020.2.4.362

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions