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Metastatic Brain Tumors Radiosurgery - Crossref

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Last Updated: 27 January 2022

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Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors: a comprehensive review of complications

Object Stereotactic radiosurgery is often used to diagnose brain metastases. To identify risks and predictors of brain metastases, the authors reviewed a large number of patients who underwent SRS for brain metastases to find causes and predictors of their occurrence. Methods Prospectively gathered clinical data from 273 patients undergoing SRS for 1 or 2 brain metastases at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between June 1993 and 2004. New complications were largely associated with multivariate analysis, progressing primary cancer, tumor formation in eloquent cortex, and lower SRS dose on multivariate analysis. New neurological difficulties were found on multivariate analysis, a tumor site in the eloquent cortex, and progressing primary cancer were all closely associated with new neurological difficulties. Conclusions The authors found that new medical and nonneuropathic disorders were associated with 40% of SRS therapies for brain metastases. Patients with lesions in functional brain regions have a significant risk of treatment-related complications.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2008.11.jns08984


Gamma knife radiosurgery for simultaneous multiple metastatic brain tumors

The authors reviewed the efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery in the treatment of patients with ten or more simultaneous metastatic brain tumors. In 24 patients, ten or more simultaneous metastatic brain tumors were treated with Gamma knife radiosurgery. Five patients with brain metastasis-related signs grew, six remained unchanged, and one worsened, according to KPS statistics. And in cases of ten or more simultaneous metastases, single-fraction GKS can achieve acceptable tumor control, low mortality, and good quality of life in the treatment of multiple metastatic brain tumors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2000.93.supplement_3.0030


Combination of stereotactic radiosurgery and cytokine gene—transduced tumor cell vaccination: a new strategy against metastatic brain tumors

The authors investigated the anti-tumoral effects of radiosurgery and cytokine-transduced tumor cell vaccine to see if the combination of radiosurgery and tumor cell vaccine could improve the therapy of metastatic lesions of the central nervous system's central nervous system. 34 rats were inoculated in the flank with nonirradiated MADB106 cells that had been retrovirally transduced to produce granulocyte-stimulating factor or interleukin-4 on day three, following tumor implantation. Animals treated by radiosurgery alone showed increased longevity in comparison to untreated animals, but only one of ten animals lived longer than 55 days. The single survivor of the radiosurgery-alone group died of tumor formation in 27 days, but the majority of animals from the combination therapy groups lived longer than 50 days after this challenge, but the single survivor from the radiosurgery-alone group died of tumor growth in 27 days. The combination of radiosurgery and cytokine gene—transduced tumor cell vaccine—prolonged animal growth and protected animals from a new challenge by parental tumor cells implanted in the CNS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2001.95.6.0984


Gamma knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer: a comparison between small cell and non—small cell carcinoma

Comparing non-SCLC participants, the aim of this retrospective analysis was to determine the success of gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer. Patients who met the following five standards were surveyed in this study: 1 no prior brain tumor treatment; 2 25 or fewer lesions; 3 a maximum of three tumors with a diameter of 20 mm or larger; and 5 more than six months of life expectancy. The results of this research indicate that GKS appears to be as safe in treating brain metastases from SCLC as for those from NSCLC.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2002.97.supplement_5.0484


Evaluation of the response of metastatic brain tumors to stereotactic radiosurgery by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 201TlCl single-photon emission computerized tomography, and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

On Gd-enhanced MR images, a decrease in the number of the Gd-enhanced lesion, and a change in the lesion's improved effect after treatment were identified as showing the efficiency of SRS between 1 and 3 months or more. In 25 lesions, a high choline peak and a lipiddominant peak were discovered, as well as a lactate-dominant peak, as a lactate-dominant peak were observed. According to the results, 1 H-MR spectroscopy is arguably more reliable tool in measuring SRS response than 201 TlCl-SPECT or Gd-enhanced MR imaging, and that it can be used earlier than other imaging techniques for this purpose.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2004.100.5.0835

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions