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Metastatic Brain Tumors Gamma Knife - Crossref

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Last Updated: 27 January 2022

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Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors

Objects published in Japan The authors compared the findings of Gamma Knife surgery for brain metastases obtained at two institutions in Japan. Methods We reviewed a series of 2390 patients with brain metastases who underwent GKS from 1998 to 2005 in two hospitals ranging from 1998 to 2005. Even if tumor numbers were higher than 4, all visible lesions were irradiated with a total skull integral dose of 10–12 J. If new distant lesions were discovered, salvage GKS was properly performed. In Chiba and 84. 2% in Mito, respectively, for the first year. Without prophylactic WBRT, brain metastases without prophylactic WBRT can cause neurological damage and allows a patient to maintain healthy brain health. However, there is one key patient selection criterion: regardless of how many tumors there are, all lesions can be irradiated with a TSID of 12 J.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns/2008/109/12/s18


Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors from primary breast cancer: treatment indication based on number of tumors and breast cancer phenotype

Objective The aim of this research was to determine prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival as well as indications for the first treatment with the Gamma Knife in patients with up to ten metastatic brain tumors from primary breast cancer. Methods Outcomes were retrospectively reviewed in 101 women with a total of 600 tumors who underwent Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors between April 1992 and December 2008 at one institution. Results The mean tumor volume at GKS was 3. 7 cm 3 in 2003. The local tumor growth control rate was 97%, according to neuroimaging, and tumor response rate was 82. 3%. According to a multivariate analysis, larger tumor size and lower margin dose were both significant adverse prognostic factors for local tumor growth control. In 76 patients and 5 or more in 25 patients, the number of brain metastatic lesions was 4 or fewer in 76 patients and 5 or more in 25 patients. After initial GKS, there were no statistically significant differences between the three breast cancer phenotypes for the incidence of new brain metastases. Conclusions First GKS resulted in high local tumor control rates, which were associated with long survival and a reduced risk of neurological disease among patients with up to ten metastatic brain tumors from primary breast cancer patients. If new brain metastases develop, the researchers recommend additional GKS or whole-brain radiation therapy for recovery therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2010.8.gks10932


Gamma knife radiosurgery for simultaneous multiple metastatic brain tumors

Patients with 10 or more simultaneous metastatic brain tumors were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery, according to the authors. In 24 patients, ten or more simultaneous metastatic brain tumors were treated, according to Gamma knife radiosurgery. Five patients with brain metastasis-related diseases increased, six remained unchanged, and one worsened, as shown by the KPS' scores. And in cases with 10 or more simultaneous metastases, single-fraction GKS can achieve acceptable tumor control, low morbidity, and high quality of life in the treatment of multiple metastatic brain tumors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2000.93.supplement_3.0030


Gamma knife treatment for multiple metastatic brain tumors compared with whole-brain radiation therapy

Multiple cerebral metastases were compared to that of whole-brain radiation therapy, according to the aim of this retrospective research. During 1990 to 1999, ninety-six consecutive patients with cerebral metastases from non-small cell lung cancer were treated in ninety-six consecutive patients with cerebral metastases from nonsmall cell lung cancer. Large lesions were surgically removed from GKS, and all other small lesions were treated by GKS. New distant lesions were treated by repeated GKS without prophylactic WBRT. The two groups did not differ in terms of age, sex, initial Karnofsky Performance Scale score, gender, initial Karnofsky Personal Scale score, species, lesion number, and size of lesion, systemic surveillance, and chemotherapy. The GKS team's neurologic stability and qualitative tenacity were longer than those of the WBRT group. Patients with up to ten cerebral metastases from non-small cell cancer can have their Gamma knife radiosurgery without prophylactic WBRT, as well as others without prophylactic WBRT.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2000.93.supplement_3.0032


Gamma knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer: a comparison between small cell and non—small cell carcinoma

This retrospective review was conducted to determine the success of gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer, with particular emphasis on small cell lung carcinoma compared to non-SCLC. The Tumor control rate in the SCLC group was 95% in the SCLC group and 98% in the NSCLC group at 1 year was 95%. Both numerical survival and 69. 9% for qualitative recovery were within 86 percent for psychological longevity and 68. 9% for qualitative revivability in the SCLC group; those in the NSCLC group were 87. 9% for neurological and 79. 9% for qualitative survival; those in the NSCLC group had 86. 9% for neurological and 79. 9% for qualitative survival; qualitative survival were 86. 9% for socioeconomic survival; and 78. 9% for qualitative survival. According to the findings of this report, GKS seems to be as effective in treating brain metastases from SCLC as well as those from NSCLC.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2002.97.supplement_5.0484


Three-stage Gamma Knife treatment for metastatic brain tumors larger than 10 cm3: a 2-institute study including re-analyses of earlier results using competing risk analysis

OBJECTIVE The results of 3-stage Gamma Knife therapy for relatively large brain metastases have previously been published for a group of patients in Chiba, Japan. During the 2005-2005 period, 78 patients undergoing GK radiosurgery for brain metastases at Mito Gamma House, 78 of whom had the largest tumor was > 10 cm 3, were examined for 3-st-Tx. RESULTS The overall median life time after 3-st-GK-Tx was 8. 3 months in the M-series and 8. 6 months in the C-series was 8. 6 months. Actuarial survival rates in the M-series and 61. 5 percent and 26. 4% in the C-series were respectively 56. 1 percent and 32. 2 percent. CONCLUSIONS There were no significant differences between the two series in terms of overall survival times, neurological stability, preserved neurological function, local monitoring, repeat SRS, and SRS-related issues between the two groups in terms of total survival times, physiological endurance, maintained neurological health, continued neurological function, and SRS-related complications among the two groups in terms of post-st-GK-Tx studies between the two series in terms of long-term survival times, surgical longevity, continuous medical monitoring, and SRS,.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.7.gks181392


Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brainstem tumors

Object The authors investigate the findings in patients with metastatic brainstem tumors treated with Gamma Knife surgery. Methods Between March 1989 and March 2005, 53 patients with metastatic brainstem lesions underwent GKS for 53 patients. The mean number of the metastatic deposits at the time of diagnosis was 2. 8 cm 3. All but one of 18 patients with symptomatic brainstem deposits remained free of symptoms. neurological symptoms in 35 patients with symptomatic brainstem deposits improved in 21 patients, remained stable in 11, but worsened in three cases. Six of more advanced intracranial deposits in other areas of the brain died, three of the three patients' progressing metastatic brainstem lesion, and six of additional progressive intracranial deposits in other regions of the brain. Neither previous whole-brain radiation therapy nor a single brainstem metastasis was statistically related to the time of survival. The prognosis of metastases to the brainstem is largely determined by the severity of systemic diseases.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2006.105.2.213


Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors without prophylactic whole-brain radiotherapy: results in 1000 consecutive cases

Objectivity: The authors reviewed Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors without using adjuvant prophylactic whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods Among 1127 patients in whom new brain metastases had been reported, 97 were excluded from the analysis due to an internal skull dose greater than 10 J; or symptomatic carcinomatous meningitis. The 89. 1 and 49. 3%, respectively, were both 89. 1 and 49. 3% in terms of neurological growth and new lesion-free rates at 1 year. The most common causes of poor prognosis in a multivariate analysis were more than four new brain metastases and active extracranial disease. Conclusions Without prophylactic WBRT, GKS alone provides excellent palliation in meeting the target of preventing neurological death and retaining activities of daily living for patients with brain metastases. With GKS salvage surgery alone, new distant lesions were easily controlled.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/sup.2006.105.7.86


Ommaya reservoir placement followed by Gamma Knife surgery for large cystic metastatic brain tumors

Object The treatment of large cystic metastatic brain tumors was evaluated using an Ommaya reservoir placement and Gamma Knife surgery. Methods The medical records of 22 patients harboring 28 tumors, who underwent Ommaya reservoir placement and later GKS for large cystic metastatic brain tumors were retrospectively reviewed. The mean estimated tumor volume at GKS was 13. 4 cm 3. In five patients treated with both GKS and external radiotherapy, the mean tumor margin dose was 16 Gy in 17 patients treated by GKS only and 11 Gy in 17 patients treated by both GKS and 11 Gy. In two patients with four tumors, Asymptomatic intracystic hemorrhage associated with Ommaya reservoir placement was seen, but no serious complications were observed, but no significant complications were reported. Conclusions Ommaya reservoir placement followed by GKS is both safe and safe for large cystic metastatic brain tumors. Within a few days of Ommaya reservoir placement, Gamma Knife surgery should be carried out.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/sup.2006.105.7.79


Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brain tumors from renal cell carcinoma

Object The authors reviewed the results of Gamma Knife surgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from renal cell carcinoma. Methods The authors' study conducted a retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes in 69 patients with metastatic brain tumors from RCC who underwent GKS at the authors' institution. After GKS's decision to examine the change in 132 tumors after treatment, follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was used at a median of 7. 1 months. The mean prescription dose at the tumor margin was 21. 8 Gy. On univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor growth control was remarkably correlated with tumor growth control. At the time of GKS, sixty of the 132 tumors diagnosed with MR imaging were identified with definite peritumoral edema. 34 patients died of systemic disease and 10 died of progressive brain metastases in this study, while ten died of progressive brain metastases. The number of lesions at the first GKS, the Karnofsky Performance Scale's first GKS, were highly correlated with survival time, according to a recursive partitioning analysis report, and the time from diagnosis of RCC to brain metastasis were highly correlated with survival time. Conclusions Gamma Knife surgery is safe for RCC metastatic brain tumors. The administration of peritumoral edema is highly correlated with the delivery of the tumor margin. If possible, even in patients with multiple metastases, Gamma Knife surgery should be used as the first therapeutic technique, as the primary therapeutic strategy, even in patients with multiple metastases. Because of the poor sensitivity of RCC to conventional radiation therapy, repeating GKS has been highly recommended for newly developed brain metastases.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2006.105.4.555

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions