Advanced searches left 3/3

Metal Recycling - Wiley Online Library

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 16 January 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Is a focus on ‘Recycling’ useful? A wider look at metal mutability and the chemical character of copper‐alloys

In archaeological descriptions of technology, recycling is becoming more apparent. However, this paper discusses in greater detail whether a singular focus on recycling is beneficial to archaeological science. It examines the historical link between recycling and early copper alloy determination, chemical characterization, and general concepts of metal mutability and characterization. However, it is more beneficial to have recycling emerge from case study findings as part of a broader strategy rather than solely focusing on it as a single goal.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/arcm.12753


Soil Contamination and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by a Tropical Earthworm Species (Alma nilotica) at Informal E‐Waste Recycling Sites in Douala, Cameroon

Soil contamination at electronic waste recycling centers is widespread, but some locations have yet to be investigated. This research was designed to raise concerns of soil contamination by heavy metals at e-waste recycling plants and the extent that these metals bioaccumulate in Alma nilotica, a tropical earthworm species. Soil samples were collected from 8 informal ewaste recycling centers and two reference sites in Douala, Cameroon, and analyzed for metals content by Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometry. In comparison to reference sites, the concentrations in ewaste sites were noticeably higher than in reference sites. There was a positive correlation between soil metal concentrations and earthworm growth, but metals with higher soil concentrations tended to have lower bioaccumulation factors. These findings reveal that ewaste sites in Douala are contaminated with metals, and that native earthworm species can bioaccumulate in large amounts.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/etc.5264


Recyclable, Immobilized Transition‐Metal Photocatalysts

Transition catalysts have enabled the success of a variety of organic transformations in an outstanding manner, not only by high yields, TOF, and selectivity standards, but also by modulating and providing access to novel molecular structures that, without them, would be difficult, if not impossible. However, one of the main questions regarding the use of these photocatalysts is the difficulties associated with their isolation from reaction media and reutilization after the chemical process ends. Transitionmetal complexes are usually costly, and their incomplete recovery may result in leakage into the atmosphere, which could lead to leakage into the environment. We hope that this report will spark new efforts to design novel catalytic systems, not only because of yields, but also on environmental and recyclability.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adsc.202101048

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions