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Metal Recycling - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 16 January 2022

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Recycling of aluminium laminated pouches and Tetra Pak cartons by molten metal pyrolysis - Pilot-scale experiments and economic analysis.

This paper discusses experimental results on pilot plant trials to recycle AL boxes with a molten metal pyrolysis reactor. However, the recovered aluminium from Al pouches may need mechanical polishing as the customer's details is printed onto the aluminium, leaving a carbon residue on the recovered aluminium. Moreover, an economic evaluation of a 4,000-t/y industrial-scale plant shows that a molten metal AL recycling plant is economically viable, with a return rate of over 20% throughout the plant.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34896737


Investigating the metal contamination status from recycling e-waste sites from Dakar, Senegal.

Processes for recycling e-wastes in Senegal resulted in the release of so-called heavy metals in the environment. The metal content and soil concentrations of soils obtained from four e-waste recycling facilities located in the Dakar area are described in this study. The zinc, copper, manganese, and iron in soils are high, but they are not equal in soils, with Cu being 66 mg/kg in Mbeubeus landfill to more than 1000 mg/kg for Mn and 10,000 mg/kg for Zn. According to Reubeuss and Pikine, respectively, the most elevated average lead values are obtained from the e-waste recycling centers located in Dakar's urban area. The calculated health risk index remains below average for all vegetables, indicating that there is no potential danger of vegetable intake for human health. Therefore, continuous monitoring of the vegetables grown in the immediate vicinity of recycling zones is required in order to ensure food safety.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34851486


An overview of global power lithium-ion batteries and associated critical metal recycling.

As the success of electric cars is driving the explosive growth of EV LIBs, the rapid development of lithium-ion batteries in emerging markets is pouring huge amounts of cash into and sparking widespread concern in the battery industry. This review paper provides an overview of the global situation of power LIBs, focusing on different ways to handle spent power LIBs and their associated metals. The study of the long-chain of power LIBs is highlighted, as recycling metal materials can ease the tight supply chain.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34896721


Bioelectrochemical systems-based metal recovery: Resource, conservation and recycling of metallic industrial effluents.

The BES technology platform has redox capabilities with small energy-intensive processes, which is expected. BES' positive reputation in metal recovery is explored in this book by demonstrating the importance of BES over the latest physical and chemical techniques. With the schematic illustration, the BES' reaction to metal recovery has been speculated. Based on the available literature findings, Operational barriers to BES-based metal recovery, such as biocathode and metal toxicity, are extensively discussed.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34742708


Concentrations, homolog profiles, and risk assessment of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in soil around factories in a non-ferrous metal recycling park.

Chlorinated paraffins are used as additives in metal processing in the metal smelting process. There are no studies on CPs in the environment near metal smelting plants in the United States. This research was designed to investigate human exposure to CPs in soil around factories in a non-ferrous metal recycling park in Hebei, China, and congener profiles of CPs. There were strong correlations between the MCCP concentrations, some SCCP carbon homologs, and the total organic carbon content in some SCCP carbon homologs. SCCPs and MCCPs in the soil may have originated from extreme pressure additives containing CP-42 and CP-52 and CP-containing waste from the factories, according to a hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis. The CPs concentrations in soil did not pose significant health risks to either children or adults, according to a further risk analysis.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/34740736

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions