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Metabolic Syndrome - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 23 April 2022

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GRACILE syndrome

GRACILE syndrome is a chronic illness that begins before birth and is a common disease that begins before pregnancy. Before birth, life before birth is slowing in GRACILE syndrome. Infants with GRACILE syndrome have an increase of lactic acid in the body within the first day of life. Babies with GRACILE syndrome have cholestasis, which is a reduced ability to produce and export bile-containing bile. In the first few months of life, Cholestasis leads to irreversible liver disease.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/gracile-syndrome


Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a buildup of excess fat in the liver that can lead to liver damage similar to alcohol use, but it occurs in people who do not drink heavily. The liver is usually low in cholesterol, so an individual is expected to have a fatty liver if the liver contains more than 10% fat. The fat deposits in the liver associated with NAFLD generally have no symptoms, but they can cause elevated levels of liver enzymes that are not present in routine blood tests. People with NAFLD have inflammation of the liver, which can lead to liver damage. However, persistent or long-term injury may lead to the replacement of normal liver tissue with scar tissue, resulting in irreversible liver disease that causes the liver to stop working properly. Scarring in the vein that brings blood into the liver from the other digestive organs can raise the risk of elevated blood pressure in the blood vessel, resulting in enlarged blood vessels inside the digestive system. Many cases of cirrhosis with no apparent underlying cause are thought to be responsible for many cases of cirrhosis with no apparent cause; at least one-third of people with NASH will suffer cirrhosis. However, a person with NAFLD may not have any or any of the other diseases that contribute to the metabolic syndrome, and people with some or both of these disorders may not have NAFLD.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease


Cowden syndrome

Almost everybody with Cowden syndrome has hamartomas. Cowden syndrome is an increased risk of experiencing several forms of cancer, including breast cancer, a gland in the lower neck called the thyroid gland, and the uterus lining. Other cancers that have been uncovered in people with Cowden syndrome include kidney cancer, colorectal cancer, and an invasive form of skin cancer called melanoma. People with Cowden syndrome have been diagnosed with these cancers at younger ages, often beginning in their thirties or forties, often beginning in their thirties or forties. People with Cowden syndrome are also more likely to experience more than one cancer in their lifetimes than the general population. While most people do not meet the strict criteria for a medical diagnosis of Cowden syndrome, they do have some of the disease's characteristic characteristics, particularly the cancers. Both Cowden syndrome and Cowden-like syndrome are caused by mutations in the same genes. Cowden syndrome's symptoms are similar to those of another disorder, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome. Those with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome also have hamartomas and other noncancerous tumors. Some people with Cowden syndrome have relatives with Bannayan-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and some of the more vulnerable individuals have the characteristic characteristics of both disorders. Instead of two distinct conditions, researchers have suggested that Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Ruvalcaba syndrome correspond to a variety of overlapping characteristics known as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/cowden-syndrome


Klinefelter syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome, a chromosomal disorder in boys and men that can influence physical and intellectual growth, is a chromosomal condition in boys and men that can influence physical and mental growth. Both boys and men with this disorder are taller than average and are unable to father biological children; however, the signs and symptoms of Klinefelter syndrome differ among boys and men with the disorder. Boys and men with Klinefelter syndrome have relatively small testes that produce a reduced amount of testosterone. Testosterone is the hormone that controls male sexual growth before birth and during puberty. Other bodily changes related to Klinefelter syndrome are usually subtle. Children with Klinefelter syndrome may have low muscle tone and coordination issues with coordination that may stifle motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking. Boys and men with Klinefelter syndrome generally have better receptive language skills than expressive language skills, and can have a difficult time expressing themselves and communicating. Autism Spectrum Disorder is present in a ten percent of boys and men with Klinefelter syndrome. Nearly half of all men with Klinefelter syndrome experience metabolic syndrome, which is a group of disorders affecting type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, elevated belly fat, elevated cholesterol levels, and triglycerides in the blood. Adults with Klinefelter syndrome, breast cancer, thinning and weakening of the bones, and autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis have an elevated risk of experiencing trembling lympeta.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/klinefelter-syndrome


Polycystic ovary syndrome

Overweight male sex hormones are present in most women with polycystic ovary syndrome, which is also called hyperandrogenism. Hyperandrogenism and elevated levels of other sex hormones prevent normal egg cell production from the ovaries and chronic menstrual periods, contributing to the inability of conception a child or complete inability to conceive. On medical imaging, small, immature ovarian follicles with cysts may appear as cysts in polycystic ovary syndrome. Normally, ovarian follicles contain egg cells that are released during ovulation. About half of all women with polycystic ovary syndrome are overweight or obese, and at an elevated risk of a fatty liver. In addition, some women with polycystic ovary syndrome have elevated blood sugar levels, which is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels. About ten percent of overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome have abnormally high blood sugar levels by age 40, and up to 32% have prediabetes. Androgens are also increased in polycystic ovary syndrome's elevated insulin levels, which can contribute to increased production of androgens. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome, elevated blood pressure, elevated body fats, elevated amounts of unhealthy fats, and elevated blood sugar levels are all at risk for developing metabolic syndrome, which is a group of conditions that involve elevated blood pressure, elevated belly fats, elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar levels, and elevated blood sugar levels. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are more likely than women in the general population to suffer mood disorders such as depression than women with depression.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/polycystic-ovary-syndrome

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions