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Metabolic Acidosis - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 23 April 2022

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SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis

SLC4A1-associated distal tubular acidosis is a kidney disorder that may cause blood cell abnormalities. In patients with distal renal tubular acidosis, the kidneys normally filter fluid and waste products from the body and discard them in urine; however, in those with distal renal tubular acidosis, the kidneys are unable to remove enough acid from the body, and the blood becomes too acidic. In addition, most children and adults with SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis have excess calcium in the urine, calcium deposits in the kidneys, and kidney stones. Low potassium levels in the blood may also be present in affected individuals. Even though their kidneys have trouble removing acids, these people are thought to have incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis. In addition, these individuals may have other signs of distal renal tubular acidosis, such as bone disease and kidney stones. People who had incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis also have metabolic acidosis later in life, particularly in childhood. People with SLC4A1-associated renal tubular acidosis may also have blood cell abnormalities, according to Blood cell samples. These can range in severity from no symptoms to hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells prematurely break down, causing a shortage of red blood cells. The autosomal recessive form is always associated with complete renal tubular acidosis and is more closely associated with blood cell abnormalities, although not everyone with this condition has abnormal blood cells.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/slc4a1-associated-distal-renal-tubular-acidosis


3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

HMG-CoA lyase deficiency is most noticeable within the first year of life. During an episode, blood sugar levels can become dangerously poor, and a buildup of harmful chemicals can make the blood too acidic. HMG-CoA lyase deficiency is often mistaken for Reye syndrome, a serious condition that occurs in children when they don't appear to be recovering from viral infections such as chicken pox or flu. During these viral infections, the majority of cases of Reye syndrome are related to the use of aspirin.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coa-lyase-deficiency


Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2

Pseudohypohypohypoglypohypogpohormone type 2 is characterized by conditions that affect the body's control of sodium and potassium levels. Despite having normal kidney function, people with PHA2 have elevated blood pressure and elevated potassium levels in their blood. In addition, affected individuals have elevated chloride and acid levels in their blood. People with PHA2 may also have elevated calcium levels in their urine.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/pseudohypoaldosteronism-type-2


Renal tubular acidosis with deafness

Many children and adults with renal tubular acidosis with deafness have short stature, and many have kidney stones, and most have kidney stones. Deafness' metabolic acidosis in renal tubular acidosis may cause softening and weakening of the bones, often called rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Bone pain, bowed legs, and walking difficulties are all typical of this bone disorder. Hypokalemic paralysis, a condition that causes extreme muscle impairment in people with reduced blood potassium levels, is rare in those with renal tubular acidosis with deafness. Hearing loss due to changes in the inner ear commonly starts between childhood and young adulthood, and it gets worse as the disease progresses. It's unclear if the relationship between an increased vestibular aqueduct and hearing loss is unclear. An increased vestibular aqueduct appears in people whose hearing loss begins in childhood, and is particularly noticeable in patients with deafness.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/renal-tubular-acidosis-with-deafness


Glutathione synthetase deficiency

Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a disorder that prevents the manufacture of a critical molecule called glutathione. The deficiency of Mild glutathione synthetase results in the destruction of red blood cells in a common occurrence. Individuals with moderate glutathione synthetase deficiency may have symptoms that start shortly after birth, including hemolytic anemia, 5-oxoprolinuria, and elevated acidity in the blood and tissues. People affected by moderate glutathione synthetase deficiency may have neurological effects, as well as the ones present in moderate glutathione synthetase deficiency. Recurrent bacterial infections are also present in some people with severe glutathione synthetase deficiency.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/glutathione-synthetase-deficiency


Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1

Pseudohypohypoeldosteronism type 1 is a disorder that is characterized by difficulties in regulating the amount of sodium in the body. However, sodium can also be removed from the body through other organs, such as the sweat glands and colon. Pseudohypotypedosteronism type 1 is recognized for its characteristic signs and symptoms, which mimic low levels of a hormone called aldosterone that helps regulate sodium levels. However, PHA1 patients have elevated aldosterone levels. Infants with PHA1 can also have high levels of acid in the blood. Infants with autosomal recessive PHA1 may have additional signs and symptoms as a result of multiple organ involvement. Because of the body's imbalance of salts, affected individuals may experience episodes of abnormal heartbeat or shock. Although adults with autosomal recessive PHA1 can have repeated episodes of salt loss, they do not typically have additional signs and symptoms of the condition.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/pseudohypoaldosteronism-type-1


Corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

Corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency, also known as aldosterone synthase deficiency, is a condition characterized by elevated amounts of sodium and urine in the first few weeks of life. Individuals with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency can also have elevated amounts of acid in the blood. Many infants in the affected infants are unable to thrive, which means they do not gain weight or grow at the expected rate. Severe cases of corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency can result in seizures and coma, and it can be life-threatening.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/corticosterone-methyloxidase-deficiency

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions