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Mental Health - PLOS

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Last Updated: 15 May 2022

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Assessing the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic, shift to online learning, and social media use on the mental health of college students in the Philippines: A mixed-method study protocol

Due to continued loneliness and a lack of contact with fellow students and teachers, college students may suffer psychological consequences as a result of the abrupt transition to online classes. Our report seeks to examine Filipino college students' mental health and estimate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the shift to online education, and the use of social media. In addition, facilitators or stressors who changed the mental health status of the college students during the COVID-19 pandemic, quarantine, and the subsequent shift to online learning will be investigated. Using generalized linear models, associations between mental health care services and potential risk factors can be estimated, while a thematic analysis will be taken for the KIIs' findings. The University of the Philippines' Ethics and Publication Board has approved our research.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267555


‘Unheard,’ ‘uncared for’ and ‘unsupported’: The mental health impact of Covid -19 on healthcare workers in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa

In KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, the primary aim of this report was to determine and analyze this psychological impact on public sector physicians and nurses. With the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 item, depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms were measured, as well as post-traumatic stress by the Impact of Events Scale-Revised version. According to 68. 0%, 63% said their fears were not "heard," 76% did not feel "cared for" and 79. 9% and 74. 0% did not feel "physically" or "psychologically" supported, respectively, and 61. 0% said that their fears were not "heard," 73 percent did not feel "cared for," and 79. 9% and 74. 0% did not feel "physically" or "psychologically" backed, High rates of depression, anxiety, stress, and post-hospitalization among healthcare professionals, as well as poor employer support, illustrate the need to identify and address healthcare staff's psychosocial support needs and expectations for the duration of the pandemic, as well as the mental health sequelae post-pandemic.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266008


Clustering of physical health multimorbidity in people with severe mental illness: An accumulated prevalence analysis of United Kingdom primary care data

Background: People with chronic mental disorder have higher incidences of a variety of physical health disorders in this population, but no one is aware of the clustering of physical health problems in this group. Compared to people without SMI, we set out to investigate the incidence and clustering of chronic physical health problems in people with SMI. We found 68,783 adults with a primary care diagnosis of SMI from 2000 to 2018, ranging from 1:4 to 274,684 patients without an SMI diagnosis, based on age, sex, primary care, and year of registration at the clinic. Patients with SMI had elevated odds of 19 of 24 disorders and a higher risk of multimorbidity, particularly in younger age groups. Although many with SMI and without SMI were similar, two clusters of 4 clusters were common to those with and without SMI; in those with SMI and 3 distinct clusters in comparators; and 2 small clusters were exclusive to the SMI cohort. Conclusions: We found that physical health problems clustered similarly in people with and without SMI, but patients with SMI had an elevated risk of multimorbidity, particularly in younger age groups. The prevalence and clustering of physical health problems and multimorbidity in people with significant mental disorders is explored in an observational review of primary care data from the United Kingdom.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1003976


Protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing the Circle of Security-parenting (COS-P) with treatment as usual in child mental health services

Children who received mental health services have much higher rates of instability in comparison to the general population, yet the parent-child relationship is little in treatment focus. No randomized controlled trials have investigated the effect of COS on parental perception and child psychiatric disorders in child mental health services. Methods: COS-P is compared to TAU for children's access to child mental health services in a random controlled parallel superiority trial. If their child is between 3 and 8 years old and scores in the 93d percentile on both the CBCL total score and the oppositional disorder or conduct disorder subscale, families are randomized 2:1 to intervention or control group, with scores ranging from 93 to 93. This trial will provide valuable data if attachment-based interventions such as COS-P can improve treatment as normal in child mental health services.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0265676


Places of safety? Fear and violence in acute mental health facilities: A large qualitative study of staff and service user perspectives

According to employees and service user perspectives and experiences, it's impossible to imagine violence on acute mental health units. Background: The collateral harm in acute inpatient mental health services is numerous, impacting the health and wellbeing of staff and service users, as well as public perceptions of people who are physically sick. Despite international research on the topic, few studies have looked at psychological unit violence from both staff and service user perspectives. Methods: We undertook in-depth interviews with 85 people in four adult acute mental health care units in New Zealand. Both staff and service users confirmed that violence was a common problem in acute inpatient units. Service users were more likely to attribute negative conduct to contextual causes and staff more likely to blame "blame" mental disorders, with service users being more likely to attribute problematic behaviour on the unit's diverse ethnic group. Conclusion: Violence in acute inpatient mental health units in New Zealand is a significant, complicated, and unsolved issue that has a negative effect on the therapeutic mission of these units. More in-depth qualitative studies are urgently needed into what is perceived as abuse by service users, their understanding of how violence occurs, the importance of fear, and power relations, as well as the contributions of the physical and organizational environment to all forms of violence to all unit users. The acute mental health unit's primary aim is to provide a medical environment for individuals at their most vulnerable.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266935


Mental health literacy survey among Cambodia’s urban and rural populations: Results from a vignette-based population survey

Method: Tours were staged to hold seminars that provided information about mental health in Phnom Penh and Siem Reap's health centers, as well as a questionnaire on mental health in the health centers around Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, and a questionnaire on mental health was conducted prior to each location's presentation. The results for each item were compared using the chi-square test and the odds rate was estimated after the participants were put into the "agree group" and "disagree group" for each item. Participants in SR expressed more strongly than those in PP when it came to participants' concerns about schizophrenia. Conclusion: Overall, the participants in the SR group were more likely to have negative attitudes against schizophrenia than those in the PP group. These results support our assertion that mental health literacy in a specific region is a form of community mental stability.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0265120


Do family and maternal background matter? A multilevel approach to modelling mental health status of Australian youth using longitudinal data

However, the overwhelming majority of the mental health disease epidemic occurs during the youth years, according to age of onset studies. Method: For ten years, the study's results were collected from 975 participants and 4632 participants in the Household, Wealth, and Labour Dynamics in Australia longitudinal research. To determine the effect of youth life on mental health status, multilevel logistic regression models were used to examine the effect of youth circumstances on mental health status. Conclusions: The results show that not all measures of family and maternal history have influence on youth mental stability. Conclusions: Our findings are in contrast to the majority of studies in the literature, which show that maternal characteristics in child and youth mental health are a factor. Mental health interventions should investigate heterogeneity among adverse youth situations and health-related behaviours.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267191


Household water and food insecurity negatively impacts self-reported physical and mental health in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

This report looked at compounded effects of household food insecurity and WASH on adult adults in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta's self-reported physical and mental health. 552 people were interviewed in one northern and one southern province of the Vietnamese Mekong Delta's northern province. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional survey looked at 552 households. According to the physical fitness composite score and mental health composite score, both physical and mental health were assessed. Lower MCS were attributed to poor food security and food availability, using fewer than 50 litres of water pppd and the use of untreated drinking water, with lower MCS, with lower MCS, with water usage being a factor contributor to household food insecurity and MCS. Compared to targeting either food or water insecurity in isolation, adopting joint-action policies for programs that simultaneously tackle water and food insecurity could result in greater health, particularly mental stability.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267344


Healthcare worker trauma and related mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City

During the COVID-19 pandemic, we use a psychological trauma framework to map the mental health risks for clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers occupations. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterize risk factors for trauma and anxiety-related mental health problems among HCWs at a public hospital in New York City's epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. This report includes findings from a cross-sectional survey of NYC HCWs shortly after the initial 2020 epidemic surge. “Do you have a family member or friend who tested positive for COVID?” The survey also looked at lifestyle and work conditions, including “do you have a family member or acquaintance who tested positive for COVID. ” Only a small number of HCWs supported the possibility of Coronavirus Anxiety, PTSD, and Coronavirus Obsession. This research supports previous research establishing the mental health risks for the healthcare workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to this report.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0267315


Machine learning for passive mental health symptom prediction: Generalization across different longitudinal mobile sensing studies

Mobile sensing data processed using machine learning algorithms can help patients' mental health issues be assessed objectively and remotely. Prior work has developed models based on results from single longitudinal studies, which were collected from demographically homogeneous populations over short time periods, using a single data collection device or mobile application. This report is the first attempt to determine if models developed using longitudinal study results to predict mental health signs generalize across publicly available figures. Models developed with combined data were more likely to be predictive than models constructed with single-study results. These results, taken together, show that machine learning algorithms developed on combined longitudinal study results may generalize across heterogeneous datasets. To enable improved analysis of model generalizability, we encourage researchers to disseminate collected de-identified mobile sensing and mental health symptom data and then standardize data types collected across studies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266516

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions