Advanced searches left 3/3

Meningitis - DOAJ

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 23 June 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Post ventriculoperitoneal shunting S. Maltophilia Meningitis

Case description: We present a case of a 5-year-old male with posterior fossa medulloblastoma who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt, suboccipital midline craniotomy, and then presented with S. Maltophilia meningitis. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a clinical and as a definitive treatment in patients with S. Maltophilia infection. S. Maltophilia meningitis' treatment is similar to that of gram-negative bacillary meningitis, but it is usually 2 weeks after the culture has been negative.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/e5683881c50d469885cf52b5f327004e


Tuberculous Meningitis: The Microbiological Laboratory Diagnosis and Its Drug Sensitivity Patterns

Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex can affect any organ other than the lung parenchyma, including the central nervous system. Objective: In Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, the goal is to determine the positivity rate of microbiological laboratory diagnosis and its drug sensitivity patterns of TBM patients. The BACTEC MGIT 960 system in Clinical Microbiology Laboratory Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya performed identification and drug anti TB sensitivity tests. TBM patients with the most TBM were women, according to the study. Proportions of positive M. tuberculosis complex in 180 specimens was 19. 4 percent. 35 isolates were 1 monoresistant, 1 poly-resistant, no multiple drug tolerant, no multiple drug allergic, and 33 pan-susceptible. Conclusion: Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex laboratory diagnosis in TBM suspect patients was poor, with a low success rate. To properly treat TBM patients, it is necessary to properly handle TBM patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.20473/jr.v3-I.2.2017.35-40


Post ventriculoperitoneal shunting S. Maltophilia Meningitis

The case of a 5-year-old male child with posterior fossa medulloblastoma underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt, suboccipital midline craniotomy, and finally met with S. Maltophilia meningitis. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole has been used as an empirical and as a definitive therapy in patients with S. Maltophilia infection. S. Maltophilia meningitis' optimal duration of therapy is similar to that of gram-negative bacillary meningitis treatment, but it is usually 2 weeks after the culture has been negative.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/613eb57d7cd1410993e15cbb921ed287


Risk Factors Associated With Prolonged Antibiotic Use in Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis

paraphrasedoutput:Methods: This retrospective cohort review looked at children aged 1 month to 18 years with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in children. Objectives: To determine the risk factors related to a reported causative pathogen from 2011 to 2021. According to whether the antibiotic course surpassed 2 weeks of the recommended course for the causative pathogen, patients were divided into an antibiotic prolongation group and a nonprolongation group. Results: 107 patients were included in this research, as well as laboratory and other parameters of antibiotic prolongation. Conclusion: Patients with ARC infections, longer hospitalization, elevated incidences of infections, and antibiotic adjustment in children with normal renal function had more days of total fever days, longer hospitalization, elevated incidences of infections, and antibiotic therapy in children with chronic renal dysfunction than patients with normal renal function.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2022.904322


Meningitis secondary to rectothecal fistula associated with congenital anterior meningocele

In the absence of an anorectal malformation, we discuss the case of a neonate with polymicrobial meningitis as a result of rectothecal communication via congenital anterior sacral meningocele. Discussion: This case represents the first reported neonatal fistula case in the absence of an anorectal anomaly.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsc.2022.102343


Outcome of acute bacterial meningitis among children in Kandahar, Afghanistan: A prospective observational cohort study.

Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children, but there are no published studies on ABM's treatment in Afghanistan. Methods We conducted a prospective observational cohort study in a tertiary care hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan, from February 2020 to January 2021. AMB was evaluated both clinically and based on lumbar puncture findings. ABM children of mean age 4. 8 years were recruited, with a total of 393 ABM children of mean age 4. 8 years recruited. Only 96 people had been tested against either Haemophilus influenzae type b or pneumococcal vaccines. Children were treated with a mixture of ceftriaxone and ampicillin, and 169/321 were given dexamethasone. Conclusions: ABM is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in Afghan children, which can be reduced by increased use of PCV and Hib vaccines.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0265487


Etiology, Clinical Phenotypes, Epidemiological Correlates, Laboratory Biomarkers and Diagnostic Challenges of Pediatric Viral Meningitis: Descriptive Review

Meningitis is a inflammatory disease of the brain and spinal cord meninges caused by infectious and non-infectious agents. Some viruses, including enteroviruses, herpesviruses, influenza viruses, and arboviruses can cause viral meningitis, also known aseptic meningitis. However, EVs are the most common cause of VM. This neurological disorder can be present immediately after the onset of the disease or take longer to manifest. The key clinical manifestations of VM include common flu-like signs of headache, photophobia, fever, nuchal rigidity, myalgia, and exhaustion. Due to other causative agents, there were no significant differences between VM and meningitis in terms of clinical phenotypes and symptoms. PVM may have occasional causes of severe health problems such as mental retardation and death. PVM's abnormal cytological and biochemical characteristics were also discussed, as well as showed potential ways to distinguish PVM from pediatric bacterial meningitis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2022.923125


Tubercular Meningitis Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy

Tubercular Meningitis is caused by the seeding of meninges with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and around one-third of the world's population is infected with it. Diabetes mellitus, chronic use of steroids, chronic alcoholism, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection are all typical in immunocompromised states that include diabetes mellitus, chronic use of steroids, persistent alcoholism, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection. Here's a sample of a 47-year-old female who presented to the Department of Medicine with a tale of vulnerability on the left side of the face which is associated with decreased hearing and tinnitus in the left ear and subjective vertigo for the first 20 days.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2022/55069.16211


Early Intracranial Hemorrhage Predicts Poor Clinical Outcome in Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

Methods a retrospective review of patients with early intracranial hemorrhage treated at a tertiary academic center between 2009 and 2019 based on patient characteristics, cerebral imaging findings, and clinical outcome. ResultsA total of 102 patients were included, with 22. 5% reporting poor clinical outcomes as a modified Rankin scale score of 5 or 6 on discharge.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2022.869716


Gardnerella vaginalis purulent meningitis in an adolescent male: a case report

Abstract Background We describe a rare case of Gardnerella vaginalis found in a young boy's cerebrospinal fluid. Case study on examination A 14-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with headache, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, and positive meningeal irritation on examination, according to the case report. The white blood cell and protein levels were elevated in Cerebrospinal fluid, while glucose was low, and urine levels were low. However, metagenomic next-generation sequencing shows G. vaginalis in his CSF. Purulent meningitis caused by Gardnerella vaginalis is extremely unusual.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12883-022-02733-y

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions