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Memory Loss - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 23 June 2022

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Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a condition characterized by a rare buildup of protein clumps called amyloid deposits in the blood vessels in the brain that cause vascular disease. People with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy experience progressive cognitive decline, stroke, and other medical disorders that begin in mid-adulthood. There are several different forms of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy. After the regions where they were first diagnosed, several forms of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy were named. The most common form is the Dutch variety of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy. About half of people with one or two strokes will have recurrent seizures. People with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy with a mixture of Flemish and Italian angiopathy are vulnerable to recurrent strokes and dementia. A stroke is often the first sign of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy in Icelandic, followed by dementia. Strokes of the Icelandic species are often earlier than those of other categories, with people experiencing their first stroke in their twenties or thirties often earlier than others. Strokes are unusual in people with the Arctic type of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which the first sign is normally memory loss and then progresses to severe dementia. Both forms of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, also known as familial British dementia and familial Danish dementia, are characterized by dementia and mobility difficulties. People with the Danish breed also have clouding of the eyes and deafness.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hereditary-cerebral-amyloid-angiopathy


Cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

In an affected person's twenties or thirties, abnormalities of the brain and other areas of the nervous system become apparent. About half of those affected people have had a stroke or similar occurrence before age 40. As the disease progresses, many people in CARASIL experience mood and personality changes, cognitive decline, memory loss, and increasing mobility difficulties as the disease progresses. CARASIL's premature hair loss and attacks of low back pain are two other typical characteristics of the region. The hair loss often begins in adolescence and is limited to the scalp. Back pain, which occurs from the discs that divide the bones of the spine from one another, develops in childhood to mid-adulthood. CARASIL's signs and symptoms are gradually increasing as time progress. Most affected people die within a decade after signs and symptoms first appeared, although only a few people with the condition have lived for 20 to 30 years.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/cerebral-autosomal-recessive-arteriopathy-with-subcortical-infarcts-and-leukoencephalopathy


Behçet disease

Behu00e7et disease is an inflammatory disease that affects multiple organs of the body. Behu00e7et disease patients suffer from widespread inflammation of blood vessels, which is reflected in the health problems. Aphthous ulcers are usually the first signs of Behu00est disease, with painful mouth sores. The genitals tend to be covered with ulcers in about 75% of all people with Behu00e7et disease. Behu00e7et disease can also cause painful bumps and sores on the skin. erythema nodosum is a form of red, tender nodules that have no symptoms. In more than half of Behu00e7et disease patients, an inflammation of the eye called uveitis is present in more than half of patients. Eye problems are more common in younger people with the disorder, and they affect men more often than women. Eye pain and redness are also present in inflammation. Blindness can be caused by eye disorders related to Behu00e7et disease if untreated. In Behu00e7et disease, joint involvement is also common. Behu00et disease is a chronic disease of the brain and spinal cord, digestive tract, large blood vessels, heart, lungs, and kidneys. Behu00e7et disease is most noticeable in a person's twenties or thirties, although they can appear at any age. Some affected individuals have mild to moderate signs that are limited to sores in the mouth and the genitals. Behu00e7et disease symptoms may appear and disappear over a period of months or years. In the majority of affected individuals, the health problems associated with this disorder increase with age.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/behcet-disease


Familial hemiplegic migraine

A form of migraine headache that runs in families is familial hemiplegic migraine. Each headache can last from a few hours to a few days. A pattern of neurological signs called an aura precedes the headache in several forms of migraine, including familial hemiplegic migraine. Temporary numbness or weakness in people with familial hemiplegic migraine, auras are also characterized by temporary numbness or weakness, most affecting one half of the body. In those with familial hemiplegic migraine, unusually high migraine episodes have been recorded. Although most people with familial hemiplegic migraine recover completely between episodes, physical signs such as memory loss, and attention deficit problems can persist for weeks or months. Around 20% of people with this disorder have mild but persistent difficulty coordinating movements, which may exacerbate as time goes, and fast, involuntary eye movements, nystagmus.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/familial-hemiplegic-migraine


Citrullinemia

Citrullinemia is an inherited condition that causes ammonia and other harmful chemicals to build in the blood. Two forms of citrullinemia have been described; they have different signs and symptoms and are caused by gene mutations in various genes. In the first few days of life, Type I citrullinemia usually appears in the first few days of life. In several instances, the health issues related to type I citrullinemia are life-threatening. Less commonly, a milder form of type I citrullinemia may appear later in childhood or adulthood. Type I citrullinemia is a genetic disorder that causes type I citrullinemia. Some people with gene mutations that cause type I citrullinemia have never shown signs or symptoms of the condition. Type II citrullinemia most affects the nervous system, causing confusion, exhaustion, memory loss, abnormal habits, seizures, and coma. Adult-onset type II citrullinemia can cause life-threatening signs and symptoms. Adult-onset type II citrullinemia may also occur in people who had a liver disease called neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency. Neonatal-onset type II citrullinemia is also present in this liver disease. In several instances, the signs and symptoms of NICCD go away within a year. In rare cases, injured people have other signs and symptoms in early childhood after struggling to recover from NICCD, including delayed growth, extreme hunger, particular food preferences, and abnormal amounts of fats in the blood. Some people with NICCD or FTTDCD are able to identify the signs of adult-onset type II citrullinemia years or even decades later.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/citrullinemia


Lipoid proteinosis

Lipoid proteinosis is a disorder that results from the development of several small clumps of proteins and other molecules in various organs throughout the body. Voice abnormalities persist throughout life and can eventually lead to difficulties speaking or complete loss of speech. Involvement of the throat, tonsils, and lips can lead to respiratory difficulties and upper respiratory tract infections. Deposits in the tongue can lead to a thick and short tongue. They can also thicken the band of tissue that links the tongue to the tongue's bottom of the throat, making it impossible to extend the tongue. Due to the tooth damage caused by the taste buds' loss, the tongue may also have a smooth appearance. Several tiny, bead-like bumps line the upper and lower eyelids along the lash line are a common feature of lipoid proteinosis. Eyeball irritation or itching can result from eyeball pain or itching, but generally do not impair vision. Following minor injuries, the skin and mucous membranes are often fragile in children with lipoid proteinosis, resulting in bleeding and scabbing. Deposits deposit the skin, causing the skin to become thick and yellowish in color, as deposits build in the skin. Skin damage appears more often on areas that suffer friction, such as the hands, elbows, knees, buttocks, and armpits. Some people with this disorder have hair loss that affects their scalp, eyelashes, and eyebrows. Neurologic signs are also typical in people with lipoid proteinosis. The underlying cause of the neurological disorders and neurological disorders do not always occur together, so the explanation of the neurological abnormalities is uncertain.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/lipoid-proteinosis


Sporadic hemiplegic migraine

A rare occurrence of migraine headaches is a chronic hemiplegic migraine. Migraines typically cause intense, throbbing pain in one area of the head. Some people with migraines also experience nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound. Each headache can last from a few hours to a few days. A pattern of neurological signs called an aura exists in sporadic hemiplegic migraine and other forms of migraine, well before the headache's onset. Temporary numbness or weakness in people with sporadic hemiplegic migraine, auras are also described as temporary numbness or weakness, often affecting one side of the body. Extreme migraine episodes have been reported by people with sporadic hemiplegic migraine. Although most people with sporadic hemiplegic migraine recover quickly from episodes, physical signs such as memory loss, and attention difficulties can persist for weeks or months, many people with sporadic hemiplegic migraine recover fully from episodes, neurological signs such as memory loss, and attention problems can persist for weeks or months. In some individuals with sporadic hemiplegic migraine, Mild to severe intellectual impairment has been linked to severe intellectual impairment.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine


Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia is a medical disorder in which certain regions of the brain are affected by changes. Leukoencephalopathy, or the augmentation of a specific of brain tissue called white matter, is a characteristic of ALSP. Nerve fibers are covered by a substance called myelin, which insulates and protects them. The axes extend from nerve cells to nerve impulses that travel throughout the body. Glial cells are specialized brain cells that protect and maintain neurons. Many of the health signs and symptoms in people with ALSP are believed to be due to damage to myelin and neurons. Symptoms of ALSP typically appear in a person's forties and then get worse over time. Affected individuals can experience memory loss and impairment of executive function, as well as the ability to plan and execute actions and devise problem-solving strategies. Most people with ALSP have mild seizures, but most people with asthma have mild seizures, and only after the condition begins. Motor skills are harmed as a result of time, and people with ALSP may have trouble walking. ALSP was previously thought to be two distinct disorders, hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids and familial pigmentary leukodystrophy, both of which cause significant white matter damage and mobility difficulties. POLD was thought to be distinguished by the presence of pigmented glial cells and the absence of spheroids; however, people with HDLS can have pigmented cells, and people with POLD can have spheroids; people with POLD can have spheroids.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/adult-onset-leukoencephalopathy-with-axonal-spheroids-and-pigmented-glia


Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is an inherited disease that interferes with the normal breakdown of fats in the body, resulting in an increase in particular types of fats. People with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency have signs and symptoms before age 10, with one-quarter reporting symptoms by age 1. The abdominal pain is often related to pancreas inflammation. People affected by the disease may also have an enlarged liver and spleen. The higher the body's fat levels, the larger the liver and spleen become. As fat levels rise, macrophages, or white blood cells, macrophages, take in excess fat in an attempt to remove cholesterol from the bloodstream as fat levels rise. Approximately half of people with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency have small yellow deposits of fat under the skin called eruptive xanthomas. When fat intake rises and levels rises, onset of eruptive xanthomas appear; the deposits disappear as fat intake slows and rates decreases. Due to the high fat content, the blood of people with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency can have a milky appearance. When fat levels in people with this disorder rise, fats can build in blood vessels in the tissue that lines the back of the eye's tissue. This fat accumulation does not influence vision and will disappear if fats from the diet are reduced and body measurements are reduced. In people with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency, elevated fat levels can also lead to neurological signs such as anxiety, memory loss, and modest intellectual decline.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/familial-lipoprotein-lipase-deficiency


CLN11 disease

The CLN11 disease is primarily affecting the nervous system. A loss of consciousness, muscle rigidity, and generalized convulsions are all common signs of CLN11 disease. Vision loss is gradual over time and is attributed to a condition called retinitis pigmentosa, which is caused by the depletion of the light-sensitive layer at the back of the eye. People with CLN11 disease can also experience clouding of the eyes' lenses and rapid, involuntary eye movements. Besides muscle twitches, walking difficulties, and falling, as well as impaired speech, affected people can also suffer from impaired speech. People with CLN11 disease experience short-term memory loss and executive function over time, which is the ability to plan and execute problem solving techniques and tactics. Visual hallucinations involving people or animals are present in some affected individuals. One of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses is CLN11 disease.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/cln11-disease

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions